Graffiti carved on an ancient Roman building some 1,900 years ago could be from the crucifixion

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It is said to be the earliest and only known depiction of the crucifixion – an image of a humanoid figure with the head of a donkey nailed to a cross.

The anti-Christian ‘graffito’ was created between 50 AD. And 250 AD. Etched into a plaster wall of an imperial training school for ancient Roman slaves.

Below the cross is an ancient Greek text that reads, “Alexamenos worships God,” as a way of making fun of a person in the drawing who appears to be dressed as a slave.

Another room in the excavated building was found with the inscription ‘Alexamenos is faithful’, which could be either a new dig to the person or someone who came to his rescue.

The ancient graffiti was created at a time when Christianity was disapproved of by Romans who practiced paganism, which was believed to put them in power, but it is not confirmed to be the image of Jesus Christ.

It is said to be the earliest and only known depiction of the crucifixion - an image of a humanoid figure with the head of a donkey nailed to a cross.  The anti-Christian 'graffito' was created between 50 AD.  And 250 AD.  Etched into a plaster wall of an imperial training school for ancient Roman slaves.

It is said to be the earliest and only known depiction of the crucifixion – an image of a humanoid figure with the head of a donkey nailed to a cross. The anti-Christian ‘graffito’ was created between 50 AD. And 250 AD. Etched into a plaster wall of an imperial training school for ancient Roman slaves.

Archaeologists discovered the image on the wall of a building on the Palatine Hill in Rome in 1857, but the anti-Christian graffiti was brought to light by archaeologists Ticia Verveer.

At the time, the Romans were said to portray Jesus as a donkey as a way of offending faith.

Tertullian, a Christian theologian who lived from AD 160. Until 225 AD, wrote about how both Christians and Jews were ridiculed by Romans for worshiping a donkey.

In this matter we are (allegedly) guilty not only of forsaking the religion of the community, but of introducing a monstrous superstition; for some of you have dreamed that our god is a donkey’s head, ”says the ancient inscription.

Below the cross is an ancient Greek text that reads, “Alexamenos worships God,” as a way of making fun of a person in the drawing who appears to be dressed as a slave.

Another crucifixion graffito was discovered by archaeologists excavating a Roman colony in Pozzuoli that was once known as Puteoli.  The statue was discovered in 1959 by a team in the wall of a Tabernae, a kind of shop or stall in ancient Roma.

Another crucifixion graffito was discovered by archaeologists excavating a Roman colony in Pozzuoli that was once known as Puteoli.  The statue was discovered in 1959 by a team in the wall of a Tabernae, a sort of shop or stall in ancient Roma.

Another crucifixion graffito was discovered by archaeologists excavating a Roman colony in Pozzuoli that was once known as Puteoli. The statue was discovered in 1959 by a team in the wall of a Tabernae, a sort of shop or stall in ancient Roma.

‘Suppose our God is an asinine person, will you at least deny that you have the same qualities in that area as ourselves?

“Not just their heads, but whole donkeys are certainly objects of worship to you.”

While some suggest that the image of Jesus was nailed to the cross, no evidence has been found to confirm the idea.

Another crucifixion graffito was discovered by archaeologists excavating a Roman colony in Pozzuoli that was once known as Puteoli.

The statue was discovered in 1959 by a team in the wall of a Tabernae, a kind of shop or stall in ancient Roma.

This image is more detailed than the previous one as it bears the name 'Alkimilla' and has markings on the body suggesting that the woman has been flogged

This image is more detailed than the previous one as it bears the name 'Alkimilla' and has markings on the body suggesting that the woman has been flogged

This image is more detailed than the previous one as it bears the name ‘Alkimilla’ and has markings on the body suggesting that the woman has been flogged

A total of eight Tabernae were discovered, but Tabernae 5 was found destroyed with an engraving of a woman nailed to a cross.

The cross is 40 cm high, the cross piece is 26 cm long and the figure is 35 cm high.

It is believed to have been created during the reign of Trajan or Hadrian some 1,900 years ago.

However, this image provides more detail than the previous one, as it bears the name ‘Alkimilla’ and contains markings on the body suggesting that the woman was whipped.

Romans disdained Christians, believing it to be more of a revolution than a practicing faith, and believed that the failures in the empire were due to their practices.

For example, a fire destroyed much of Rome in AD 64. And, to escape blame, Emperor Nero murdered a “great crowd” of Christians as scapegoats.

Then, in the 3rd century, the economy of ancient Rome collapsed, there was political chaos, armies revolted, and a barbaric invasion nearly destroyed world power – and Christians were once again blamed.

Romans believed it was the Christian’s denial of the gods who were thought to be protecting Rome, which nearly caused it to fall.

And to regain that divine protection, emperors introduced the systematic persecution of Christians throughout the Roman Empire.