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The catastrophic campfire in Paradise last November lasted more than 17 days for the fire brigade. A face painted by Grammer can be seen here on a mantelpiece
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A street artist tries to bring a little hope to the ruined city of Paradise, where 85 people died in California & # 39; s deadliest forest fire.

Shane Grammer from Los Angeles has created ghostly murals on the walls of burnt-out buildings with his series & # 39; faces of hope & # 39 ;.

The catastrophic campfire in the Butte County last November was one of the devastating forest fires in America, raging through more than 18,000 buildings.

It took more than 17 days for firefighters to grasp the flames that went on to record everything that lay on its path and left much of the deserted city behind – a frightening shell of its former self.

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After hearing about the disaster, Grammer traveled to the destroyed sites, where he made faces, often with women staring at the destruction.

The ghostly murals were sprayed on building remains, scorched walls, barely standing chimneys and other remains of houses and businesses.

The catastrophic campfire in Paradise last November lasted more than 17 days for the fire brigade. A face painted by Grammer can be seen here on a mantelpiece

The catastrophic campfire in Paradise last November lasted more than 17 days for the fire brigade. A face painted by Grammer can be seen here on a mantelpiece

Tragically, 85 people died in the fire described as the worst forest fire in California and more than 18,800 buildings were destroyed. Here a sleeping woman is painted on a brick wall

Tragically, 85 people died in the fire described as the worst forest fire in California and more than 18,800 buildings were destroyed. Here a sleeping woman is painted on a brick wall

Tragically, 85 people died in the fire described as the worst forest fire in California and more than 18,800 buildings were destroyed. Here a sleeping woman is painted on a brick wall

Grammer has & # 39; faces of hope & # 39; painted on the abandoned remains. Upstairs is a painting by his childhood friend Amber, who looks down on the remains of her house

Grammer has & # 39; faces of hope & # 39; painted on the abandoned remains. Upstairs is a painting by his childhood friend Amber, who looks down on the remains of her house

Grammer has & # 39; faces of hope & # 39; painted on the abandoned remains. Upstairs is a painting by his childhood friend Amber, who looks down on the remains of her house

Grammer tries to inspire hope and joy through his work on burnt-out buildings

Grammer tries to inspire hope and joy through his work on burnt-out buildings

The captivating images are sprayed on chimneys, cars, walls and other remains of the buildings

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Grammer told it San Francisco Chronicle: & # 39; When I hear a devastating story or find out something that has been destroyed, I see an image in my head and the feeling that I have to paint it.

& # 39; As soon as I saw the chimney [of a destroyed house in paradise] on Facebook, I had to paint it.

& # 39; Hopefully it will inspire students – hopefully it just gives them hope that there is a future here, that beauty is in paradise. & # 39;

In a particularly striking piece, he painted a picture of his friend Amber, with whom he grew up in Chico, looking down at her former home.

He wrote on Instagram: & # 39; They didn't have much to paint, but I enjoyed the burned and twisted shed. I thought it had a great texture.

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& # 39; Most of the houses around her house have burned down and disappeared. I thought this was such a powerful image and that their home is not around. Driving there is so powerful. & # 39;

As part of his work, Grammer immortalized the victim Helen Pace, who died at the age of 84 in her mobile home on Skyway Road.

Her daughter Suzanne Drews told it Washington Post: & # 39; She lived near me, but I couldn't reach her on the morning of the fire.

& # 39; We are honored that [Grammer] would paint this for us to commemorate my mother. Shane portrayed her wonder. It almost left me speechless. & # 39;

A rusted, burnt-out car with a mural on the side can be seen at the remains of a destroyed building

A rusted, burnt-out car with a mural on the side can be seen at the remains of a destroyed building

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A rusted, burnt-out car with a mural on the side can be seen at the remains of a destroyed building

One of the victims of the fire, Helen Pace, was painted by Grammer on the remains of her house on Skyway Road as a tribute

One of the victims of the fire, Helen Pace, was painted by Grammer on the remains of her house on Skyway Road as a tribute

One of the victims of the fire, Helen Pace, was painted by Grammer on the remains of her house on Skyway Road as a tribute

Grammer is depicted and works on one piece. The creepy faces are painted everywhere in the city of Paradise

Grammer is depicted and works on one piece. The creepy faces are painted everywhere in the city of Paradise

Grammer is depicted and works on one piece. The creepy faces are painted everywhere in the city of Paradise

The spooky murals stare into the distance and the destruction below
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The spooky murals stare into the distance and the destruction below

The spooky murals stare into the distance and the destruction below

He praises his wife Missy for her support and credits her with inspiring him to return.

Grammer said: & # 39; When I got home from the first trip, we were both overwhelmed by the impact that these murals have made on people in paradise.

& # 39; She said, "Honey, you have to go back." She kept the fort at home to take care of our family and to support me. I could not do this without her love and support! & # 39;

Despite some admiring the unusual faces, others are less than impressed. A woman who lives in Magalia, near Paradise, found that the & # 39; very invasive & # 39; used to be.

She told me San Francisco Chronicle: & # 39; Although I understand, and I don't want you to forget us, it feels invasive. & # 39;

After the removal of one of the murals, in a post on April 13, Grammer shared that he knew that all his pieces had a & # 39; beginning and ending & # 39; have, adding: & # 39; .. but I am forever grateful that they have brought hope and joy to so many people throughout paradise and now the world. & # 39;

You can find more of his work here.

Street artist Shane Grammer is working on a temporary piece here, spraying directly on Saran Wrap and will look back at the burned-out trees
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Street artist Shane Grammer is working on a temporary piece here, spraying directly on Saran Wrap and will look back at the burned-out trees

Street artist Shane Grammer is working on a temporary piece here, spraying directly on Saran Wrap and will look back at the burned-out trees

This piece by Grammer is only temporary and is painted on Saran Wrap, but looks back over the burnt-out trees

This piece by Grammer is only temporary and is painted on Saran Wrap, but looks back over the burnt-out trees

This piece by Grammer is only temporary and is painted on Saran Wrap, but looks back over the burnt-out trees

Grammer selectively chooses where to paint through the texture of his & # 39; canvas & # 39; to analyze before starting work

Grammer selectively chooses where to paint through the texture of his & # 39; canvas & # 39; to analyze before starting work

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Grammer selectively chooses where to paint through the texture of his & # 39; canvas & # 39; to analyze before starting work

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