Ultimate magazine theme for WordPress.

GPs are revolting about an attempt to detect cancer earlier by regularly visiting patients in a care home

GPs are revolting about an attempt to detect cancer earlier by regularly visiting patients in a care home

  • Is part of the contract with NHS officials to encourage operations to work together
  • But GPs say that the conditions are excessive in view of the intense workforce pressure
  • They are concerned about the question of doing ‘care grounds’ once every fourteen days

GPs are revolting about goals that require them to visit a nursing home once every fourteen days and discover cancer much earlier.

The measures are part of a five-year contract that has been agreed with NHS officials to encourage operations to work together to improve healthcare.

But general practitioners say that the conditions are excessive given the high workforce and the demands of a growing and aging population.

GPs are revolting about goals for which they have to visit a care home every fourteen days and have to detect cancer much earlier (photo of the file)

GPs are revolting about goals for which they have to visit a care home every fourteen days and have to detect cancer much earlier (photo of the file)

They are particularly concerned about the requirement to carry out ‘home rounds’ of care homes in their catchment area at least twice every two weeks from September onwards.

Doctors say that this would be far too time-consuming because detailed checks on only one house of 30 residents would cost one doctor a day.

They are also concerned about more forms being filled in, with operations being requested to include 50 new ‘statistics’, including the number of patients with low-carbon asthma inhalers and the percentage of residents of healthcare institutions who have had a ‘delirium’ review.

Another goal is to ensure that three-quarters of cancer patients are diagnosed early in 2028. General practitioners are asked to increase the number of patients being examined for lung, cervical, breast and colon cancer.

The goals also instruct them to regularly perform medication assessments on patients with long-term disorders to check if they are not taking too many medicines.

Professor Martin Marshall, president of the Royal College of GPs, said: “We are very concerned that the amount of extra work required to meet these specifications, combined with the short time schedules, makes delivery almost impossible.”

Dr. Nicholas Grundy, who works in the center of London, said: “This level of work is not something that can be taken over by primary care physicians.

‘This is a full-time function for thousands of doctors at the national level, who provide a completely new service on a trial basis to see if it works – and get paid for it.

The measures are part of a five-year contract agreed with NHS officials to encourage operations to work together to improve care (file photo)

The measures are part of a five-year contract agreed with NHS officials to encourage operations to work together to improve care (file photo)

The measures are part of a five-year contract agreed with NHS officials to encourage operations to work together to improve care (file photo)

“The way it looks now, it would be disastrous for patient care, personnel retention and recruitment and for the daily operation of primary care.”

But Caroline Abrahams of the Age UK charity said: “We strongly support the NHS’s efforts to improve the health care available to residents of care homes, as they often receive worse service than when they live at home.”

By yesterday afternoon, 1,355 people – mostly GPs – had signed a petition by the GP Survival campaign group calling for the measures to be re-introduced.

A study by Pulse magazine of 477 senior doctors performing operations showed that 82 percent would refuse to sign the voluntary contract.

The five-year deal was approved by NHS England and the British Medical Association last January, but the full details of the new targets were not revealed until last month.

The consultation on the measures is being closed today and a NHS England spokesperson insisted that it listened to the concerns of GPs.

Another spokesperson said, “Patients would like to see further improvements in their much-appreciated local GP services and taxpayers are supporting this with additional funding in line with the contract GPs agreed in January 2019.”

n A large academic hospital is considering sending patients home early, despite admitting that they can ’cause harm’.

Managers at the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro have drafted the proposal to reduce A&E pressure and because there is very little bed room for incoming patients.

The doctors’ leaders said the idea was “morally repulsive” and “short-sighted.”

They said that patients who are sent home too quickly run the risk of developing infections, malnutrition, or a serious fall, especially when they are older.

An internal memo sent last week explained that managers considered “a number of possible mitigations” to relieve pressure, including looking at the level of risk clinicians take when discharging patients.

.