Google identifies 150 applications that infect Windows PCs with malware

Some of the infected applications include & # 39; Learning to draw clothes & # 39 ;, an application that teaches people to draw and design clothes; & # 39; Modification Trail & # 39 ;, an application that shows images of ideas of modification of bicycle paths; & # 39; Gym Training Tutorial & # 39 ;, an application that allows people to find ideas for gymnastic movements

Google says that 145 applications in its app store were loaded with malicious files designed to attack your computer.

The applications, some of which were downloaded hundreds of times, have now been removed from the Play Store, but can still lurk on the devices of unsuspecting users.

Malicious software, also known as malware, does not affect Android devices, but you could cultivate your private data if an infected device is connected to a Windows PC.

Once inside a computer, the virus can track the keys, reveal credit card numbers, account passwords and even social security numbers.

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Some of the infected applications include & # 39; Learning to draw clothes & # 39 ;, an application that teaches people to draw and design clothes; & # 39; Modification Trail & # 39 ;, an application that shows images of ideas of modification of bicycle paths; & # 39; Gym Training Tutorial & # 39 ;, an application that allows people to find ideas for gymnastic movements

Some of the infected applications include & # 39; Learning to draw clothes & # 39 ;, an application that teaches people to draw and design clothes; & # 39; Modification Trail & # 39 ;, an application that shows images of ideas of modification of bicycle paths; & # 39; Gym Training Tutorial & # 39 ;, an application that allows people to find ideas for gymnastic movements

Palo Alto Networks discovered the malicious applications and went on to notify Google of the error.

Applications are no longer available in the Play Store, but have been easily downloaded since around October 2017.

They were designed to infect Windows PCs when users inadvertently connected their Android device to upload or transfer files.

Not all applications from the same developer had the same Windows files, which led researchers to postulate that developers used different computers when creating application code.

It is believed that some of these computers were infested with malware, allowing the software to reach the applications.

The report explains that there is a key file present in all the deleted applications, a keylogger.

This could have been used by hackers to use Windows devices to spy on users.

Some of the applications were downloaded hundreds of times and have now been removed from the Play Store. Users who have downloaded any of these files through the Android application on a PC may be infected

Some of the applications were downloaded hundreds of times and have now been removed from the Play Store. Users who have downloaded any of these files through the Android application on a PC may be infected

Some of the applications were downloaded hundreds of times and have now been removed from the Play Store. Users who have downloaded any of these files through the Android application on a PC may be infected

Google has just removed 145 applications from its application store because they contained malicious files designed to attack Windows PCs. Malicious software (malware) is not effective for Android devices but could reveal the personal information of users of Microsoft devices.

Google has just removed 145 applications from its application store because they contained malicious files designed to attack Windows PCs. Malicious software (malware) is not effective for Android devices but could reveal the personal information of users of Microsoft devices.

Google has just removed 145 applications from its application store because they contained malicious files designed to attack Windows PCs. Malicious software (malware) is not effective for Android devices but could reveal the personal information of users of Microsoft devices.

The report says: On a Windows system, this keylogger attempts to record keystrokes, which can include sensitive information such as credit card numbers, social security numbers and passwords.

In addition, these files falsify their names so that they appear legitimate.

& # 39; Those names include & # 39; Android.exe & # 39;, & # 39; my music.exe & # 39;, & # 39; COPY_DOKKEP.exe & # 39;, & # 39; js.exe & # 39;, & # 39; gallery.exe & # 39;, & # 39; images.exe & # 39;, & # 39; msn.exe & # 39; and & # 39; css & # 39; exe & # 39;. & # 39;

Users who have downloaded any of these files through the Android application on a PC may be infected.

Some of the infected applications include & # 39; Learning to draw clothes & # 39 ;, an application that teaches people to draw and design clothes; & # 39; Modification Trail & # 39 ;, an application that shows images of ideas of modification of bicycle paths; & # 39; Gym training tutorial & # 39 ;, an application that allows people to find healthy ideas for gymnastic movements.

WHAT APPLICATIONS WERE AFFECTED BY MALWARE?

Google has published the names of some of the infected apps, which have been removed from the Play Store but can still lurk on hundreds of people's Android devices.

It is recommended that anyone with one of these applications in their decision eliminate it immediately to avoid infection.

Baby room

MotorTrail

Tattoo name

Garage

Japanese garden

Terrace of the house

Skirt design

Yoga meditation

Shoemaker

Unique shirt

Men's shoes

TV RuanG TaMu

Idea glasses

Muslim fashion

Bracelet

Drawing clothes

Minimalist kitchen

Nail art

Ice cream

Ceiling

Children's clothes

Home roof

PoLa BaJu

Living room

Bookshelf

Knitted baby

Hair painting

Wall decoration

Mahendi painting

Body-builder

Couple shirts

Unique graffiti

Paper flower

Evening gown

Wardrobe ideas

Dinning room

Gymnastics

Use child

Window design

Hijab StyLe

Wing Chun

Fencing technique

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