Google Glass helps autistic children read facial expressions

Children with developmental disorders often do not recognize basic facial emotions, which hinders social interactions and the development of friendships. Before the study Alex, nine (in the photo) could not look people in the eyes

Google Glass can help children with autism read facial expressions to assess people's emotions, a new study has revealed.

Children with developmental disorders often do not recognize basic facial emotions, which hinders social interactions and the development of friendships.

The researchers used glasses connected to the Internet, which include a small screen mounted on the head over the user's right eye to show notifications.

The researchers paired Google Glass with a software for smartphones designed to read facial expressions captured by the camera on the front of the glasses and provide social signals for the user on the screen.

The project, known as Superpower Glass, taught children to recognize the emotions transmitted in people's facial expressions.

Google suspended its glass spectacles for consumers around the world in 2015, however, the company is working on a new version of the hardware for business customers.

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Children with developmental disorders often do not recognize basic facial emotions, which hinders social interactions and the development of friendships. Before the study Alex, nine (in the photo) could not look people in the eyes

Children with developmental disorders often do not recognize basic facial emotions, which hinders social interactions and the development of friendships. Before the study Alex, nine (in the photo) could not look people in the eyes

The research was conducted by the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The researchers programmed the complementary application for Google Glass smartphones to use the games and provide real-time information about the facial expressions of those around them.

Google Glass, which must be combined with a smartphone, consists of a frame similar to glasses equipped with a camera to record the user's field of vision, as well as a small screen and a speaker to provide the user with visual and audio information.

As the child interacts with others, the application identifies and names their emotions through the loudspeaker or the Google Glass screen.

After only one to three months of regular use, parents reported that children with autism made eye contact more regularly and interacted better with others.

And his autism improved, and some decreased from severe to moderate.

The pilot project was carried out with 14 families with a child between 3 and 17 years with a diagnosis of clinically confirmed autism.

The child tested the glasses for an average of 10 weeks.

Before the study, Alex, nine years old, could not look people in the eyes despite the soft breath of his mother, Donji Cullenbine.

He explained: "He was smiling and saying things like," You looked at me three times today … but he did not actually move the bar. "

A few weeks after the test, Alex (in the photo) began to realize that people's faces have clues about their feelings. In the United States there is currently an 18-month waiting list to see a specialist

A few weeks after the test, Alex (in the photo) began to realize that people's faces have clues about their feelings. In the United States, there is currently a waiting list of 18 months to consult a specialist.

A few weeks after the test, Alex (in the photo) began to realize that people's faces have clues about their feelings. In the United States there is currently an 18-month waiting list to see a specialist

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF AUTISM

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with autism have problems with social, emotional and communication skills that usually develop before age three and last a person's entire life.

The specific signs of autism include:

  • Reactions to smell, taste, appearance, sensation or sound are unusual
  • Difficulty adapting to changes in routine
  • You can not repeat or repeat what you are told
  • Difficulty expressing wishes using words or movements
  • Unable to discuss his own feelings or those of other people
  • Difficulty with acts of affection such as embracing
  • Prefer to be alone and avoid eye contact
  • Difficulty relating to other people
  • You can not point objects or look at objects when others point them out

A few weeks after the test, Alex began to realize that people's faces have clues about their feelings.

She said: & # 39; He told me, & # 39; Mommy, I can read minds & # 39; My heart sang. I would like other parents to have the same experience. "

Associate professor of pediatrics and biomedical data science, Dr. Dennis Wall said the treatment could help fill a large gap in autism care.

In the USA UU., There is currently a waiting list of 18 months to see a specialist.

Early therapy with autism has been shown to be particularly effective, but many children do not receive treatment fast enough to get the most benefit.

He said: "The only way to overcome the problem is to create reliable home-based treatment systems – it's a really important unmet need."

The application uses machine learning to recognize eight basic facial expressions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, fear, neutrality and contempt.

In general, children learn to recognize emotions by relating to the people around them.

For children with autism, it is different.

"They do not collect those things without specific treatment," said Professor Wall.

Families used the therapy for at least three 20-minute sessions per week with parents who completed the questionnaires at the beginning and end of the pilot.

In interviews, parents and children also commented on how the program worked for their families.

The researchers designed three ways to use the facial recognition program.

In & # 39; free play & # 39; children use Google Glass while interacting or playing with their families, and the software provides the user with a visual or aural signal each time they recognize an emotion in someone's face in the field of vision.

In the game mode "Guess my emotion", a parent represents a facial expression corresponding to one of the eight central emotions, and the child tries to identify it.

The game helps families and researchers to follow the children's improvement to identify emotions.

In the game mode "capture the smile", the children give another person clues about the emotion they want to provoke, until the other person acts, which helps the researchers to evaluate the understanding of the different emotions on the part of of the kids.

The study found that children with more severe autism were more likely to choose modes of play rather than free play.

More research is planned, but Professor Wall said the initial results were promising.

"Parent comments in interviews such as" a switch has flipped over "," my son is watching me "or" suddenly the teacher is telling me that my son is participating in the classroom "was really moving and very encouraging for us to hear "Professor Wall said.

Around 700,000 people in the United Kingdom are on the autism spectrum, more than one in 100 and affecting one in every 59 children in the United States.

The study was published in the journal Digital Medicine.

WHAT COMPANIES ARE WORKING IN GLASSES OF INCREASED REALITY?

Bose joins a rapidly growing list of technology companies that say they are developing augmented reality glasses.

The first company to enter the race was Google, which launched Google Glass in 2011.

Google Glass, now known as Glass, has gone from being a consumer-oriented product to being a business product, used by companies like Boeing.

Since then, several companies have presented their own products.

The mysterious startup Magic Leap started working on a prototype several years ago, but finally debuted with its "mixed reality" smart lenses last year.

Magic Leap says that their AR glasses will be shipped in 2018 after a wait of several years.

The Vuzix technology company, based in Rochester, New York, will launch its Vuzix Blade glasses later this year for around $ 1,300.

Smart glasses that overlay computer generated images in the world around you could start at £ 1,000 when they are released this year. Magic Leap, the generally secret company backed by Google behind the gadget, says it is working on multiple versions of the gadget

Smart glasses that overlay computer generated images in the world around you could start at £ 1,000 when they are released this year. Magic Leap, the generally secret company backed by Google behind the gadget, says it is working on multiple versions of the gadget

Smart glasses that overlay computer generated images in the world around you could start at £ 1,000 when they are released this year. Magic Leap, the generally secret company backed by Google behind the gadget, says it is working on multiple versions of the gadget

They use a small projector to show a virtual image in the upper right corner of their lenses.

Users can connect to WiFi and read emails and other messages through the screen, as well as use Alexa, Amazon's digital assistant, to issue voice commands.

It is also rumored that Amazon is working on their own AR glasses to launch at some point in the future.

In addition, Intel launched its prototype smart glasses, the Vaunt, earlier this year.

The glasses use a retinal projection to place a small screen on the user's eyeball.

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