Google eliminates third-party cookies that Chrome users follow on the internet within TWO YEARS

Google eliminates third-party cookies that Chrome users follow on the web within TWO YEAR as part of a new privacy initiative

  • Google will stop third-party cookies within the next two years
  • The company has set out the timeline this week
  • The policy is modeled on a ‘Privacy Sandbox’ initiative that was released in August
  • Google’s own data collection is not directly affected by the new rules

Google Chrome will drastically change the cookie policy to prevent companies from following users’ web history.

The company says it will gradually phase out the use of third-party cookies – a kind of digital trail – that many companies use to track users’ travel on the internet for online advertising over the next two years.

Although Google announced in August that it was planning to phase out web tracking in a blog post, this is the first time the search giant has given a timeline for its initiative.

The implications for both users and companies that may depend on web data for revenue are huge, given the dominance of Google Chrome. According to CNET, Chrome now accounts for 64 percent of all web activity.

Google recently announced that it is trying to offer users more privacy while continuing to use their information to target ads in August and has now provided a two-year timeline for change

Google recently announced that it is trying to offer users more privacy while continuing to use their information to target ads in August and has now provided a two-year timeline for change

“After the initial dialogue with the web community, we are convinced that with continuous iteration and feedback, privacy retention mechanisms and open standard mechanisms such as the Privacy Sandbox, a healthy, ad-supported web can support third-party cookies possibly outdated, “Google wrote in a recent blog post.

“Once these approaches meet the needs of users, publishers, and advertisers and we have developed the tools to reduce temporary solutions, we plan to gradually phase out support for third-party cookies in Chrome. Our intention is to do this within two years. “

Although this step helps protect user privacy against external companies, it does not change Google’s interest in moving loads of web data for its own profit.

The search giant has given no indication that it will substantively change its own policy.

A timeline for Google’s shift from third-party cookies follows a series of “Privacy Sandbox” initiatives outlined in August that focused on creating “open standards” that equalize the balance of targeted advertising and user privacy – the first of which Google says has grown steadily contrary to people’s interest.

One of the main problems for internet residents, says Google, is the “large-scale blocking of cookies” – essentially a grainy trail of someone’s internet use – that has led to some unintended side effects.

Google wants to offer users more privacy and at the same time support advertising revenue - both for themselves and for publishers who rely on the platform for their audiences

Google wants to offer users more privacy and at the same time support advertising revenue - both for themselves and for publishers who rely on the platform for their audiences

Google wants to offer users more privacy and at the same time support advertising revenue – both for themselves and for publishers who rely on the platform for their audiences

Although blocking cookies has become an increasingly popular method to get privacy back to some users and has emerged as a selling point for competitors of Chrome such as Mozilla Firefox, it has also given rise to alternative methods of web tracking, such as fingerprinting. .

This web monitoring method uses more secret information to monitor user habits, including tracking equipment, fonts, and other data points to generate unique identification.

In addition to sending companies away from invasive practices, Google will also determine its own interest and power within the targeted advertising market.

By acting as a privacy practice mediator, Google probably hopes to appease both users and regulators and users who have asked for more standards while setting a tone in the world of browsing and data that promotes itself and the businesses it relies on for income.

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