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Lucrative discovery: the ring, bearing the great-looking weapon of the Colman family, was declared by Mrs. Vall to a treasure-seeking liaison officer - but is now her property

Gold ring belonging to courtier who was wrongly executed for conspiring King Charles II found on the Loch Lomond coast 350 years after he was killed

  • The rare signet ring was discovered in six centimeters of soil with the help of a metal detector
  • It was from Edward Colman who worked for King Charles II before his death
  • He was hanged, pulled and quartered in 1678 for treason after murder attacks
  • The find was returned to treasure hunter Michelle Vall after no one had claimed it
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A gold ring that belonged to the courtier of a king is tipped to sell for £ 10,000 after it was found by a metal detector – about 350 years later.

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The signet ring was discovered two years ago in treasure bottom by treasure hunter Michelle Vall in Scotland.

The gold band belonged to Edward Colman, who worked for King Charles II before he was hanged, signed and celebrated for treason in 1678.

He was implemented in the Popish Plot – a fictional Catholic conspiracy to kill Charles.

Lucrative discovery: the ring, bearing the great-looking weapon of the Colman family, was declared by Mrs. Vall to a treasure-seeking liaison officer - but is now her property

Lucrative discovery: the ring, bearing the great-looking weapon of the Colman family, was declared by Mrs. Vall to a treasure-seeking liaison officer – but is now her property

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It is believed that the ring originally belonged to Colman's grandfather Samuel, who lived in Norfolk between 1569 and 1653 and was transferred by the family.

The ring, bearing the large-looking coat of arms of the Colman family, was declared by Mrs. Vall to a liaison officer.

But since no museum came forward to buy it, the item was returned to the 53-year-old as & # 39; finder's keeper & # 39 ;.

Mrs. Vall is now selling it at an auction with Dix Noonan Webb, who has given it an estimated £ 10,000.

Nigel Mills, from Dix ​​Noonan Webb, said: & # 39; The Colman seal ring is an excellent example of a high status ring from the period of which only a very limited number survives in this condition.

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& # 39; Metal detectors such as Michelle have greatly contributed to our knowledge by finding treasures that would otherwise have been unknown. & # 39;

The coat of arms of the Colman family, which is central to the 350-year discovery

The coat of arms of the Colman family, which is central to the 350-year discovery

The Colman sealing ring is an excellent example of a high status ring from the period of which only a very limited number survives in this condition

The Colman sealing ring is an excellent example of a high status ring from the period of which only a very limited number survives in this condition

History: The Colman sealing ring (right) is an excellent example of a high status ring from the period of which there is only a very limited number, plus the Coleman weapon (left)

Mrs. Vall, a school teacher from Blackpool, Lancs, found the ring on the shores of Loch Lomond in Scotland during her vacation with her husband Tony.

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She said: “Uncovering the ring was an unforeseen event, since me and my husband discovered a field without a specific history of finds in the area.

& # 39; The ring was only six centimeters below the ground. I knew right away that it was something special, although of course I didn't know exactly what it was.

& # 39; Finding gold is rare for us, detectorists, and I even did a dance party to celebrate. It was a very exciting moment and you just don't expect to find something special. & # 39;

She added: & # 39; The history of the ring is really interesting and it was a really great find. & # 39;

Rare: & # 39; Finding gold is rare for us, detectorists, and I even danced a little to celebrate. It was a very exciting moment and you just don't expect to find anything so special, & Mrs. Vall said

Rare: & # 39; Finding gold is rare for us, detectorists, and I even danced a little to celebrate. It was a very exciting moment and you just don't expect to find anything so special, & Mrs. Vall said

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Rare: & # 39; Finding gold is rare for us, detectorists, and I even danced a little to celebrate. It was a very exciting moment and you just don't expect to find anything so special, & Mrs. Vall said

Chance of being discovered while on holiday with her husband: the signet ring was discovered in six centimeters of land by treasure hunter Michelle Vall in Scotland, two years ago

Chance of being discovered while on holiday with her husband: the signet ring was discovered in six centimeters of land by treasure hunter Michelle Vall in Scotland, two years ago

Chance of being discovered while on holiday with her husband: the signet ring was discovered in six centimeters of land by treasure hunter Michelle Vall in Scotland, two years ago

Edward Colman was convicted as part of the Popish Plot, a fake conspiracy presented to the private council by priest Titus Oates in 1678.

Oates, later & # 39; Titus the liar & # 39; mentioned, claimed that several Catholic men were planning to kill the king, with Edward Colman among those mentioned.

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Although it was later determined that it was false, the plot resulted in the execution of at least 22 people, including Colman. He was hanged, pulled and celebrated in Newgate Prison in London in 1678.

The ring will be sold in September.

WHAT WAS THE POPISH PLOT?

The Popish Plot was a conspiracy theory proclaimed by Titus Oates.

In 1678 he claimed that the Catholic Church authorities in England had approved the murder of King Charles II.

At the time, Britain and Scotland were both seized by an anti-Catholic, so the conspiracy was generally accepted as true.

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An estimated 22 innocent men were then sent to their deaths.

In 1685 the lies of Oates began to unravel and he was later convicted of perjury.

He was imprisoned for life and ordered & be beaten five days a year through the streets of London for the rest of his life & # 39 ;.

He was pardoned in 1689, sixteen years before his death in 1705.

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