Girl is born with a small & # 39; bruise & # 39; on her forehead that turned into a BIRTHMARK of pomegranate size

A girl was born with a small bruise & # 39; on her forehead that turned into a birthmark of size.

Chloe Lambert, now nine, from Milton Keynes, arrived eight weeks earlier with a small bruise & # 39; on the right side of her forehead.

Although her parents Jean and Michael were initially not involved, the brand soon began to grow bigger every day and colored red.

Dctors assured the couple that the stain would disappear by itself, but the brand – which was larger than a 50p coin – began scabies and attracted cruel glances from strangers.

The stain continued to grow and Chloe was admitted to a treatment trial at the Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), which interrupted blood flow to her birthmark so that it could be reduced and surgically removed.

After three times under the knife, Chloe is now only with a slippery scar behind and he is proud of a & # 39; birthmark baby & # 39; to have been.

After being removed, the pair is shown young in June

Chloe Lambert was born on August 30, 2009 with a small bruise & # 39; on her forehead that turned into a birthmark of size. After being told that there was nothing that doctors could do, she is shown on the first day of a trial treatment at Great Ormond Street Hospital with her mother Jean to reduce the stain. After being removed, the pair is shown young in June

The youngster was rushed to intensive care after her arrival in only 32 weeks, with Ms. Lambert – who is also the mother of Chloë & s younger brother Thomas – to be treated for a preserved placenta, The Mirror reported.

A preserved placenta occurs when it is not expelled from the body after delivery, which can cause severe bleeding.

Unable to see her baby five hours after birth, she immediately noticed the stain on her daughter's forehead, but she became more concerned about Chloe's health after her early arrival.

After she could finally take Chloe home after weeks in the intensive care unit, Ms. Lambert noticed that her daughter's stain was growing. Dermatologists told the new parents that it was a birthmark and that they could do nothing.

However, the brand soon began to ulcerate and bleed every time it was accidentally beaten. There was even pus over when a scab on the stain came loose while the parents of Chloe dress her.

And the brand even started to weigh Chloe's eye, so children asked if they could touch it.

After being told that the imperfection would disappear, it soon began to grow every day and it turned bright red. Shown on January 23, 2010, Chloe's eye was even weakened by it

After being told that the imperfection would disappear, it soon began to grow every day and it turned bright red. Shown on January 23, 2010, Chloe's eye was even weakened by it

Desperate, the parents of Chloe went to a hospital for advice, where a passing doctor recommended a trial treatment that cut off and reduce the blood supply from the birthmark. Chloe is shown on February 15, 2010

The youngster is depicted after awakening from an operation in 2016

Desperate, the parents of Chloe went to a hospital for advice, where a passing doctor recommended a trial treatment that cut off and reduce the blood supply from the birthmark. Chloe can be seen on the photo on 15 February 2010 and immediately after waking up from an operation in 2016

Through the test treatment the birthmark was reduced sufficiently to be operated. After she had been under the knife three times, Chloe initially hid her scar under hats and with a pony, but is now proud of it. She is pictured with her mother, father Michael and brother Thomas on an active day

Through the test treatment the birthmark was reduced sufficiently to be operated. After she had been under the knife three times, Chloe initially hid her scar under hats and with a pony, but is now proud of it. She is pictured with her mother, father Michael and brother Thomas on an active day

Chloe is shown after two months of treatment with the blood pressure agent propranolol. The birthmark could only be removed if doctors knew it was no longer growing

The younger one is depicted after the operation on August 19, 2014, leaving her a slippery scar

Chloe is shown on the photo after two months of treatment with the blood pressure agent propranolol. The birthmark could only be removed if doctors knew it was no longer growing. The younger one is shown just after the operation on August 19, 2014, leaving her a slippery scar

WHAT ARE BIRTHMARKS?

A birthmark is a stain on the skin that is present at birth or develops in the first few weeks of life.

The type of birthmark depends on the most important cells involved.

Most contain melanin collected in an area to create a different color for the rest of the body.

Vascular moles consist of blood vessels that are not well formed and can look red or blue.

Most birthmarks are caused by a change in a gene during early pregnancy when skin and blood vessels are formed.

The majority of birthmarks do not need to be treated.

Those on the eyes, nose or mouth may need attention as they grow.

Laser treatment can reduce the color of some red moles.

Some imperfections fade with age, but more prominently can influence people's self-esteem and benefit from psychological therapy.

Source: Great Ormond Street Hospital

Desperate for help, the parents visited medics in a hospital just because their appointment was interrupted by a passing doctor who told them about a new lawsuit at GOSH.

She told that she was a "main candidate". was before treatment. Chloe started the therapy only three weeks later, using the blood pressure propranolol.

This helped to reduce blood flow through the mole of Chloe, making it worse and softer & # 39; became.

After a year of propranolol, doctors had confidence that the mole did not grow any more and that the young person was ready for surgery.

Chloe now lives a normal life and is finally proud of her scar after years of disguise.

"We were ecstatic with the results," Ms. Lambert said. & # 39; How the scar is now, it is as if she just had an accident.

& # 39; It shows the journey she has been to. & # 39;

Mrs. Lambert shares the story of Chloe to raise awareness of the charity organization Birthmark Support Group, which supported her family during the ordeal.

She runs the London marathon at the only place of charity and has already exceeded her target of £ 800. Donate here.

Chloe, who was born at only 32 weeks, stayed in intensive care for several weeks before he could finally grow at home. It was then that her parents noticed the ever-growing birthmark

Chloe is shown before the operation. She even pins her hair to show her scar

Chloe, who was born at only 32 weeks, stayed in intensive care for several weeks before he could finally grow at home. It was then that her parents saw the ever-growing birthmark (seen on the left). Chloe is depicted exactly before the operation. She even pins her hair to show her scar

Before and after the photo 's the change is shown, where the mark is one time larger than a coin of 50 p

Before and after the photo 's the change is shown, where the mark is one time larger than a coin of 50 p

Chloe is pictured before and after with her mother, who is ecstatic & # 39; is with the results

Chloe is pictured before and after with her mother, who is ecstatic & # 39; is with the results

Chloe is pictured with her mother at six weeks of age - around the time her birthmark began to rub, and would bleed and silt if accidentally beaten

The younger one is pictured with her younger brother Thomas

Chloe was photographed with her mother at six weeks old – around the time her birthmark began to rub and bleed. The younger one is pictured with her younger brother Thomas

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