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The unidentified three-year-old from China had two extra thumb-like appendages on each hand (pictured before the operation)

Girl born with 14 fingers has a life-changing operation to correct the birth defect that left her with two extra digits on each hand

  • She was treated at the Central Hospital of Shenyang Medical College, China
  • Medics promised that the procedure would not affect the development of the child
  • It is unclear whether the unidentified three year old girl was born with polydactyly
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A girl born with 14 fingers has undergone a life-changing operation to correct the birth defect.

The unidentified three-year-old from China had two extra thumb-like figures on each hand.

According to local reports, the defect was observed among members of the girl's family who went back five generations.

The unidentified three-year-old from China had two extra thumb-like appendages on each hand (pictured before the operation)

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The unidentified three-year-old from China had two extra thumb-like appendages on each hand (pictured before the operation)

Local reports report that the defect has been observed in members of the girl's family who go back five generations (her right hand after the operation)

Local reports report that the defect has been observed in members of the girl's family who go back five generations (her right hand after the operation)

Local reports report that the defect has been observed in members of the girl's family who go back five generations (her right hand after the operation)

The poverty-stricken family was reportedly too poor to ever seek medical help to rid her of her extra fingers (her right hand was pictured after an operation)

The poverty-stricken family was reportedly too poor to ever seek medical help to rid her of her extra fingers (her right hand was pictured after an operation)

The poverty-stricken family was reportedly too poor to ever seek medical help to rid her of her extra fingers (her right hand was pictured after an operation)

Her left hand on a scan before the operation

Her left hand on a scan before the operation

Her right hand pictured on a scan before the operation

Her right hand pictured on a scan before the operation

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She was treated at the Central Hospital of Shenyang Medical College, in the northeastern province of Liaoning (scans show her hands before the operation)

Doctors promised that the procedure would not affect the development of the child, and would retain both the function and aesthetics of her hands (pictured before surgery)

Doctors promised that the procedure would not affect the development of the child, and would retain both the function and aesthetics of her hands (pictured before surgery)

Doctors promised that the procedure would not affect the development of the child, and would retain both the function and aesthetics of her hands (pictured before surgery)

However, the poor family was reportedly too poor to ever seek medical treatment to rid her of her extra fingers.

It is unclear whether the family was eventually offered a free treatment.

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She was treated at the Central Hospital of Shenyang Medical College, in the northeastern province of Liaoning.

Medics promised that the procedure would not affect the development of the child, and would retain both the function and the aesthetic of her hands.

Hand surgery specialist Dr. Zhan Jie, who operated her, said: “The girl had two extra fingers on each hand – a fairly rare patient.

& # 39; The operation was complicated by the fact that the fingers we wanted to keep and the ones we wanted to remove were not clear and obvious. & # 39;

The girl's left hand is pictured before the operation, with markings for where doctors should cut

The girl's left hand is pictured before the operation, with markings for where doctors should cut

The girl's right hand is pictured before the operation, with markings for where doctors need to cut
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The girl's right hand is pictured before the operation, with markings for where doctors need to cut

Hand surgery specialist Dr. Zhan Jie, who operated her, said: & # 39; The girl had two extra fingers on each hand – a fairly rare patient & # 39;

The doctors not only removed the extra numbers, but also the thumbs and re-arranged bone growth with the help of metal bars (pictured, iron bars in her right thumb)

The doctors not only removed the extra numbers, but also the thumbs and re-arranged bone growth with the help of metal bars (pictured, iron bars in her right thumb)

The doctors not only removed the extra numbers, but also the thumbs and re-arranged bone growth with the help of metal bars (pictured, iron bars in her right thumb)

A scan shows iron bars depicted in the girl's reconstructed right thumb

A scan shows iron bars depicted in the girl's reconstructed right thumb

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A scan shows iron bars depicted in the girl's reconstructed right thumb

It is unclear whether the girl with polydactylia is born if too many fingers and toes are formed in the womb during the sixth or seventh week of pregnancy (pictured, her left hand after surgery)

It is unclear whether the girl with polydactylia is born if too many fingers and toes are formed in the womb during the sixth or seventh week of pregnancy (pictured, her left hand after surgery)

It is unclear whether the girl with polydactylia is born if too many fingers and toes are formed in the womb during the sixth or seventh week of pregnancy (pictured, her left hand after surgery)

Polydactyly affects around one in every 700 to 1,000 births worldwide, statistics show. It is usually picked up during an ultrasound (pictured, doctors in operation)

Polydactyly affects around one in every 700 to 1,000 births worldwide, statistics show. It is usually picked up during an ultrasound (pictured, doctors in operation)

Polydactyly affects around one in every 700 to 1,000 births worldwide, statistics show. It is usually picked up during an ultrasound (pictured, doctors in operation)

In addition to removing the extra figures, the doctors also raised their thumbs and redirected bone growth with the help of metal bars.

& # 39; It has been a month since the operation. She returned after two weeks to have her stitches removed, & said Dr. Zhan.

He added: & # 39; Both we and the patient's family are satisfied with the appearance of her hands. & # 39;

Dr. Zhan did not say whether the girl should undergo follow-up surgery for minor corrections in the future.

It is unclear whether the girl with polydactylia is born if too many fingers and toes are formed in the womb during the sixth or seventh week of pregnancy.

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Polydactyly affects around one in every 700 to 1,000 births worldwide, statistics show. It is usually picked up during an ultrasound scan.

Patients in developed countries usually have the extra figures surgically removed by the time they reach the age of two, according to the Boston Children's Hospital.

Hand surgery specialist Dr. Zhan Jie, who operated her, said: & # 39; The operation was complicated by the fact that the fingers that we wanted to keep and those we wanted to remove were not clear and obvious & # 39;

Hand surgery specialist Dr. Zhan Jie, who operated her, said: & # 39; The operation was complicated by the fact that the fingers that we wanted to keep and those we wanted to remove were not clear and obvious & # 39;

Hand surgery specialist Dr. Zhan Jie, who operated her, said: & # 39; The operation was complicated by the fact that the fingers that we wanted to keep and those we wanted to remove were not clear and obvious & # 39;

Dr. Zhan, presumably pictured, added: “Both we and the patient's family are satisfied with the appearance of her hands & # 39;

Dr. Zhan, presumably pictured, added: “Both we and the patient's family are satisfied with the appearance of her hands & # 39;

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Dr. Zhan, presumably pictured, added: “Both we and the patient's family are satisfied with the appearance of her hands & # 39;

WHAT IS POLYDACTY?

Polydactyly is a birth defect that occurs when a person is born with extra fingers or toes. It affects approximately one in every 700 to 1,000 births worldwide.

During the sixth or seventh week of pregnancy, the hands and feet of a fetus divide into fingers and toes. Polydactylia occurs when the & # 39; paddle & # 39; splits too often.

The extra number (numbers) can vary from a naked to a complete working finger or toe.

Usually the finger or toe is smaller than the other numbers and poorly formed. When fully formed, it contains all normal bones, blood vessels and nerves.

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Polydactyly is thought to happen randomly, but may have a genetic element or be linked to an underlying condition. The condition is usually seen on an ultrasound.

An operation to remove the extra numbers usually occurs when a child is one or two years old. This should leave them with a hand or foot that functions and looks as normal.

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