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Breckynn Willis, 17, left, was told she had been disqualified for the race in Anchorage, Alaska, after crushing the 100m freestyle competition last Friday. She is pictured with her coach DeWayne Ingram and sister Dreamer Kowatch
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A teenage girl who had spent high school had taken away her swimming victory because she & # 39; too many buttocks & # 39; had revealed in the decision & # 39; racist and sexist & # 39; to be by coaches.

State champion swimmer Breckynn Willis, 17, was told that she had been disqualified for the race in Anchorage, Alaska, after crushing the 100m freestyle competition last Friday.

The decision based on the & # 39; modesty rule & # 39; is now being investigated by the Anchorage School District, after local coach Lauren Langford said she & # 39; focused on the way the suits fit in their curvier, fuller bodies & # 39 ;.

Dimond High School student Willis had worn the suit without problems during three previous meetings this season, according to KTUU.

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Breckynn Willis, 17, left, was told she had been disqualified for the race in Anchorage, Alaska, after crushing the 100m freestyle competition last Friday. She is pictured with her coach DeWayne Ingram and sister Dreamer Kowatch

Breckynn Willis, 17, left, was told she had been disqualified for the race in Anchorage, Alaska, after crushing the 100m freestyle competition last Friday. She is pictured with her coach DeWayne Ingram and sister Dreamer Kowatch

Willis wore the approved suit issued by the school. Officials have released images to show suits that are considered suitable for athletes

Willis wore the approved suit issued by the school. Officials have released images to show suits that are considered suitable for athletes

Willis wore the approved suit issued by the school. Officials have released images to show suits that are considered suitable for athletes

In a statement, the Anchorage School District said: & # 39; The disqualification seems to stem from a disagreement in the interpretation of the rules for swimming uniforms for high schools.

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& # 39; The Dimond swimming team has purchased approved team suits for each swimmer who meet the NFHS requirements.

& # 39; The disqualified athlete wore the approved suit issued by the school during the race. In the first three meetings this year, the Dimond swimming team did not have any disqualifications with regard to the wear of the swimming uniform.

& # 39; We intend to gather all the facts related to the disqualification so that we can discuss the issue accurately with the officials and take appropriate measures to ensure fair, equitable competition and consistent application of the rules for this athlete and his colleague & # 39 ; s. & # 39;

West High School swim coach Lauren Langford wrote about a lengthy refutation of the decision Medium. She said: & The rest of her team wore the same uniform and she was the only one to be disqualified.

& # 39; I believe that in the past year she has attracted the target and attention.

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& # 39; It comes down to the racing thing in my opinion. It was so focused. It was so intentional and so individual.

& # 39; She is one of three girls in the Dimond team who look like her. Everyone is in the same color, tailor-made, and yet in a team of so many girls she was the only one who emerged?

& # 39; I was filled with so much suffering about the way these young girls were forced to suffer. & # 39;

She said The Washington Post: & # 39; All of these girls all wear suits that are cut the same way. And the only girl who is disqualified is a mixed race girl with more rounder, curvier functions. & # 39;

The girl's coach, DeWayne Ingram, shared Langford & # 39; s blog on Facebook and wrote: & # 39; This is an absolute disgrace and something needs to be done to rectify it as quickly as possible! I can personally confirm that these are absolutely remarkable, sincere, intelligent, passionate, academically solid and very talented student athletes who do not deserve this at all. & # 39;

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Reportedly, the same referee also criticized Breckynn's sister Dreamer Kowatch and her suit during the 2018-19 school year.

Another official at the event said the referee claimed that she & # 39; kontwang against kontwang & # 39; could see Willis's uniform.

Annette Rohde said: & # 39; I told her: & # 39; I need to know how you define this, because this is going to blow up & # 39;. & # 39;

Meagan Kowatch, the girls' mother, told KTUU that she wants to undo the disqualification.

The same referee would also have criticized Breckynn's sister, Dreamer Kowatch, left, and her suit during the 2018-19 school year. Dimond High School student Willis, on the right, had worn the suit without problems during three previous meetings this season

The same referee would also have criticized Breckynn's sister, Dreamer Kowatch, left, and her suit during the 2018-19 school year. Dimond High School student Willis, on the right, had worn the suit without problems during three previous meetings this season

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The same referee would also have criticized Breckynn's sister, Dreamer Kowatch, left, and her suit during the 2018-19 school year. Dimond High School student Willis, on the right, had worn the suit without problems during three previous meetings this season

Lauren Langford, in the photo, said the high school student was & # 39; was the target and was selected & # 39;

Lauren Langford, in the photo, said the high school student was & # 39; was the target and was selected & # 39;

Lauren Langford, in the photo, said the high school student was & # 39; was the target and was selected & # 39;

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) said in August that an athlete who wears a uniform that does not fall within the guidelines can be disqualified.

Images at Alaska School Activities Association show suits that are considered suitable for both male and female athletes.

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NFHS executive director Karissa Niehoff wrote in August: & # 39; There is a growing trend in swimming and diving in high school of athletes who wear training and competitive suits in a way that contradicts the intention of their original design and manufacture.

& # 39; In particular, suits are worn in such a way that the buttocks of the athlete become visible. This problem is not gender-specific and occurs in various states throughout the country. & # 39;

Guidelines say that the suits must be worn in the correct size as prescribed by the manufacturer's specifications for the athlete's body type and must remain unchanged. Boys wear suits that cover the buttocks, and girls wear suits that cover the buttocks and breasts. & # 39;

But Langford states: & # 39; Before these suits even hit an athlete's body, their cut does not comply with the rule of modesty. & # 39;

Sandy Searcy, Sports Director for the NFHS, said: “What we are trying to do is try to define the parameters of the problem that has been frankly presented to us by adults who feel uncomfortable on deck with young men and young men and women who are not properly covered. & # 39;

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