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Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says she has benefited all her life from her whiteness, also in her career

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says she has benefited from her & # 39; whiteness & # 39; also in her professional career.

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Gillibrand said she & # 39; as a white woman & # 39; certainly experienced huge amounts of white privilege when speaking at the presidential forum.

She spoke repeatedly about a black executive who is her traveling companion on the campaign path. She's assistant is treated differently than she's in hotels and restaurants.

& # 39; There is a respect given to whiteness in today's society. And you see it all the time, & she told DailyMail.com after her comments.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says she has benefited all her life from her whiteness, also in her career

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says she has benefited all her life from her whiteness, also in her career

She said: & I am traveling with a black woman, watching how she is treated when we walk into a hotel room, to a hotel to check in. I watch how she is treated in a restaurant. I watch how the person who takes her order listens to her order and does it well.

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& # 39; I have been sitting with black Americans, and they are literally not being listened to, & she said.

Gillibrand gave additional examples of how the people around her were discriminated against under different circumstances and told DailyMail.com that they have & # 39; absolutely & # 39; had benefited from her whiteness in her career, that she believes it is her responsibility as a senator and presidential candidate to correct.

& # 39; Absolutely. I don't think you can exaggerate the reality of institutional racism in contemporary society. I really don't think you can overdo it. It is so dominant. It is in health care, it is in education, it is in economy, it is in the criminal justice system, & she said after a speech to the participants of the Netroots Nation conference in Philadelphia.

She said that when she was stopped because they were heading in the wrong direction, a police station asked her if she needed help.

& # 39; If I were a black woman, or God forbid a black man, he would not only get me out of that car, he could arrest me. I can be shot, & she said.

Gillibrand continued to talk about her challenging pregnancies and the first-class health care she received.

& # 39; I just saw it and it is painful to look at it and it needs to change & # 39 ;, she said, claiming to have a & # 39; comprehensive approach & # 39; to tackle systemic racism.

Gillibrand holds a mother's baby while the activist questions her about immigration at the Netroots Nation presidential candidate forum in Philadelphia
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Gillibrand holds a mother's baby while the activist questions her about immigration at the Netroots Nation presidential candidate forum in Philadelphia

Gillibrand holds a mother's baby while the activist questions her about immigration at the Netroots Nation presidential candidate forum in Philadelphia

When she was specifically asked about how she benefited from DailyMail.com in her career, she sighed deeply and said: & it's me, I know for sure. I'm sure of it. I think you know disproportionately that black and brown people have fewer economic opportunities. Just look at the pay gap.

& # 39; The fact that white women earn more than black women earns more than Latinas. It is in the reward that I receive, so the truth is yes, I have benefited from my whiteness, and that is just a fact. & # 39;

She did not suggest that white privilege would provide a platform for her current bid for the presidency of the Senate seat she had inherited ten years ago.

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Gillibrand was appointed as a member of the US Senate by the governor of New York in 2009 to fill the void created by Hillary Clinton when Barack Obama made her foreign minister.

She had just been elected for her second term at the House of Representatives. She won next year's general election with 63 percent of the votes and then extended her lead six years later with four percentage points.

The mother of two worked as a lawyer at law firms in Manhattan, of which she has a partner with, prior to her first election to the US Congress.

Her remarks about white privilege Saturday were a moment on her bus trip three days earlier, when a woman told her that city residents do not feel particularly privileged.

Gillibrand had told the woman in Youngstown, Ohio, that the talk about privileges is no longer there when a community has been left behind for generations because of the color of their skin, when you are fired after job after job because you are black, and your children have a higher death rate.

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She had given various examples, focusing on the African-American detention rate.

In Philadelphia, at a forum for 2020 candidates for president, Gillbrand extended her answer and said: & I had to recognize her pain, her suffering that is real. Because it is. & # 39;

Gillibrand said she believes it is her job to fight for the wife's family as an elected official, if it were her own family members.

& # 39; But this conversation about white privilege is so important. Because what she doesn't see is that when her son gets older, while my sons get older, there will be moments in his life that his whiteness protects him. His whiteness changes how he is treated, & she said.

She told the crowd with examples: & # 39; When he walks down the street in a hoodie, with a bag of M & M & # 39; s in his pocket, he won't be shot, & # 39; she said as she tore herself apart. & # 39; If her son's car breaks down and he needs help and walks into someone's house and knocks on the door, he is not fired at.

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& # 39; If her son applies for a job, he will not be discriminated against because of the color of his skin. When her son smokes, like many teenagers in America, the fact that he is white probably means that he will not be arrested. And if he were, he would probably get a second chance. & # 39;

Gillibrand brought up her black assistant and said that & # 39; as a white woman, who has certainly experienced huge amounts of white privilege & # 39; furiously & # 39; when she is treated differently.

& # 39; So if I don't understand that it is my responsibility to raise her voice, to raise the voices of black and brown Americans every day, I will not do my job as a US senator, and I will not my job as a presidential candidate. And that's my responsibility, & she decided to applaud.

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