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Giants’ Alyssa Nakken becomes the first woman to coach in a Major League-game

Alyssa Nakken, the first female coach in big league history, set another precedent on Monday-evening by becoming the first woman to coach first base in an MLB-game.

Nakken, 30, worked the Monday exhibit against athletics in Oakland, and while that may not be her part in the upcoming regular season, manager Gabe Kapler was eager to give her that experience.

“Alyssa did a great job at first base today,” said Kapler. ‘[First-base coach] Antoan [Richardson] stepped up and made sure that Alyssa continued her development. ‘

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Alyssa Nakken, the first female coach in big league history, set another precedent on Monday-evening by becoming the first woman to coach first base during an MLB-game

Nakken, 30, worked Monday's exhibition against athletics in Oakland, and while that may not be her part in the upcoming regular season, manager Gabe Kapler was eager to give her that experience

Nakken, 30, worked Monday's exhibition against athletics in Oakland, and while that may not be her part in the upcoming regular season, manager Gabe Kapler was eager to give her that experience

Alyssa Nakken, 30, worked the Monday exhibit against athletics in Oakland, and while that may not be her part in the upcoming regular season, San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler said he would like to give her that experience

Nakken wore a mask during Monday's game, just like the rest of the Giants coaches

Nakken wore a mask during Monday's game, just like the rest of the Giants coaches

Nakken wore a mask during Monday’s game, just like the rest of the Giants coaches

As the first baseball coach, Nakken was responsible for telling baserunners when to go to second and when to hold first. She also instructed runners when they took a small lead out of the bag, making sure they weren't pecked by the opponent's pitcher

As the first baseball coach, Nakken was responsible for telling baserunners when to go to second and when to hold first. She also instructed runners when they took a small lead out of the bag, making sure they weren't pecked by the opponent's pitcher

As the first baseball coach, Nakken was responsible for telling baserunners when to go to second and when to hold first. She also instructed runners when they took a small lead out of the bag, making sure they weren’t pecked by the opponent’s pitcher

Nakken, who wore a mask like the rest of the coaching staff, did not speak to the media afterwards. In her temporary role on Monday, Nakken was responsible for telling baserunners when to move to second place and when to hold first. She also gave them instructions when they took a small lead out of the bag, making sure they weren’t picked first by the opponent’s pitcher.

The former softball player at the University of Sacramento State joined the Giants in 2014 as an intern in the baseball operations department and recently led the organization’s health and wellness initiatives.

In February she described what it was like to be promoted to a coaching position.

“I feel a great sense of responsibility,” Nakken said on the website Giants website. “Coaching, I’ve never seen it. This job has been hidden for so long. I am so excited to be in this role for the challenge and opportunity to make an impact for this organization that I love. But I’m also happy that girls can now see that there is a job on the field in baseball. It’s really cool. ”

Nakken was a former softball player at the University of Sacramento before joining the Giants in 2014 as an intern in the baseball operations department. She recently led the organization's health and wellness initiatives

Nakken was a former softball player at the University of Sacramento before joining the Giants in 2014 as an intern in the baseball operations department. She recently led the organization's health and wellness initiatives

Nakken was a former softball player at the University of Sacramento before joining the Giants in 2014 as an intern in the baseball operations department. She recently led the organization’s health and wellness initiatives

In February, Kepler told the Sacramento Bee that Nakken will work with players running on their base and practicing batting.

“(Nakken) is the best choice for this job, period,” Kapler told the Bee. “She has experience as a top athlete. She went to the Giants organization. She led successful initiatives with the Giants. She fit perfectly. ‘

The response to Nakken’s presence was overwhelmingly positive on social media.

Judge rightfielder Hunter Pence congratulated her on Twitter for “writing history.”

“Daily reminder that women are and always will be part of sports,” wrote Rachel Bevelaqua, hockey reporter at the Amherst Wire, the student-run web magazine at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. “Congratulations to Alyssa Nakken for breaking the MLB barrier.”

And when someone on Twitter complained that he was as qualified as a first base coach as Nakken, journalist Steven Rissotto responded quickly with her resume.

Rightfielder Hunter Pence congratulated Nakken on Monday after the game

Rightfielder Hunter Pence congratulated Nakken on Monday after the game

Rightfielder Hunter Pence congratulated Nakken on Monday after the game

“Alyssa Nakken was a high school athlete with three sports,” Rissotto began. All four years in college, she was an All-Pacific Coast softball player.

“She’s been with the organization for six years.

“She’s qualified.”

Nakken was not the only member of Giants’ coaching staff to make history Monday night.

Before the game, Kapler became the first big league manager to kneel in protest of racism during the national anthem.

He was joined by several other players and coaches, but Nakken chose to face the national anthem.

“Alyssa Nakken has more balls than some of the @SFGiants players,” wrote Giants first baseman, Aubrey Huff.

Huff, a decidedly conservative, is critical of athletes demonstrating peacefully during the national anthem.

Nakken was not the only member of Giants’ coaching staff to make history Monday night. Before the game, Kapler became the first big league manager to kneel in protest of racism during the national anthem. He was joined by several other players and coaches, but Nakken chose to face the national anthem. “Alyssa Nakken has more balls than some of the @SFGiants players,” wrote Giants first baseman, Aubrey Huff. Huff, a decidedly conservative, is critical of athletes demonstrating peacefully during the national anthem

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