Giant & # 039; pac-man & # 039; system could gobble up plastic from the Pacific Ocean

The gigantic system & pacman man & # 39; consists of a 600-meter-long float that sits on the surface of the water, with a 3-meter-deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

Researchers hoping to deploy a 600-meter plastic sweeper in the Pacific Ocean to clean up the notorious Great Floating Garbage Reservoir have revealed the final design of their contraption.

The gigantic system & pacman man & # 39; consists of a 600 meter floating tube that sits on the surface of the water, with a 3 meter deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris.

Take advantage of the power of wind and surface waves to sweep the area autonomously, accumulating plastic waste as it goes.

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The gigantic system & pacman man & # 39; consists of a 600-meter-long float that sits on the surface of the water, with a 3-meter-deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

The gigantic system & pac: man & # 39; consists of a 600-meter-long float that sits on the surface of the water, with a 3-meter-deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

In the water, the pac man & # 39; will catch plastic in a skirt, which will be emptied by a boat every few weeks

The Ocean Cleanup Project was forced to radically redesign the system after tests of its original system discovered that it was moving too much due to the waves.

Powered by wind and waves, the system will operate around the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, gathering plastic as a "giant Pac-Man powered by wind and waves," said CEO Boyan Slat.

"After completing the redesign last summer and passing third-party reviews, this is the design that is currently being built and is ready to enter the Great Pacific Garbage Patch within two months," he said.

The plastic waste collected by the system will be carried by a ship every few months and taken ashore to be recycled.

"The models show that a deployment of the large-scale cleaning system (a fleet of approximately 60 systems) could clean 50% of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in just five years," says the firm.

"After deploying fleets of systems in each oceanic turn, combined with the reduction of the source, the Ocean Cleanup projects managed to eliminate 90% of the oceanic plastic by 2040."

Powered by wind and waves, the system will work around the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by attaching plastic like a giant "Pac-Man powered by the wind and the wave," said CEO Boyan Slat.

A 3 meter deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

A 3 meter deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

A 3 meter deep conical skirt attached below to trap plastic debris. In the photo, part of the main tube

The system is designed to capture plastics ranging from small pieces of only millimeters in size to large debris, including discarded massive fishing nets (ghost nets), which can be tens of meters wide.

"The screen is the part of the system that is intended to concentrate the subsurface plastic against the floats," explains Ocean Cleanup.

WHAT IS THE PATCH PATCH?

The GPGP, defined as the area with more than 10 kg of plastic per km2, measures 1.6 million square kilometers, three times the size of mainland France.

In this area, 1.8 billion pieces of plastic, weighing 80,000 metric tons, are accumulated, the equivalent of 500 Jumbo Jets.

These figures are four to sixteen times higher than the previous estimates.

The GPGP measures 1.6 million square kilometers, three times the size of mainland France.

The GPGP measures 1.6 million square kilometers, three times the size of mainland France.

The GPGP measures 1.6 million square kilometers, three times the size of mainland France.

92% of the mass is represented by larger objects; while only 8% of the mass is contained in microplastics, defined as pieces smaller than 5 mm.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), located halfway between Hawaii and California, is the largest area of ‚Äč‚Äčoceanic plastic accumulation on Earth.

Conventionally, researchers have used simple, fine mesh networks, typically less than one meter in size, in an attempt to quantify the problem.

However, this method produces a large uncertainty due to the small surface that is covered.

Furthermore, these methods could not measure the magnitude of the problem to its full extent, since all sampling networks, small and large, could not capture objects larger than the size of the network.

"It also plays an important role in drifting behavior of the system once it is fully deployed to move freely over currents and wind.

"The 120-meter system, the longest we have deployed to date, has a screen similar to what it will have in the entire system."

A recent study found that 1.8 trillion plastic pieces weighing 80,000 metric tons are currently afloat in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and it is rapidly worsening.

Researchers waiting to deploy a 600-meter plastic sweeper in the Pacific Ocean to clean up the notorious floating Great Garbage Patch have already conducted critical tests on the San Francisco coast

Researchers waiting to deploy a 600-meter plastic sweeper in the Pacific Ocean to clean up the notorious floating Great Garbage Patch have already conducted critical tests on the San Francisco coast

Researchers waiting to deploy a 600-meter plastic sweeper in the Pacific Ocean to clean up the notorious floating Great Garbage Patch have already conducted critical tests on the San Francisco coast

The test will examine the performance of the system in the water, following a complex pattern that goes with and against the waves, and hits different weather conditions. This will reveal how the screen holds up under trailer in the real world

The test will examine the performance of the system in the water, following a complex pattern that goes with and against the waves, and hits different weather conditions. This will reveal how the screen holds up under trailer in the real world

The test will examine the performance of the system in the water, following a complex pattern that goes with and against the waves, and hits different weather conditions. This will reveal how the screen holds up under trailer in the real world

These are the main conclusions of a three-year mapping effort by an international team of scientists affiliated with The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, six universities and an aerial sensor company.

Boyan Slat said: "In order to solve a problem, we believe it is essential to understand it first.

"These results provide us with key data to develop and test our cleaning technology, but it also underscores the urgency of dealing with the problem of plastic contamination.

"Given that the results indicate that the amount of dangerous microplastics will increase more than tenfold if fragmented, now is the time to start."

WHAT ARE MICROPLASIAS AND HOW CAN THEY ENTER INTO OUR WAYS NAVIGABLE?

Microplastics are plastic particles that measure less than five millimeters (0.2 inches).

They have made headlines in recent years, as inadequate disposal has caused tons of waste to enter the ocean.

Every year, tons of plastic waste are not recycled or treated properly, which can mean they end up in marine ecosystems.

Although it is not clear exactly how they end up in the water, microplastics can enter through the simple daily wear of clothing and carpets.

Drum dryers can also be a source, particularly if they have outdoor ventilation.

Plastics do not decompose for thousands of years and it is estimated that there are already millions of articles of plastic waste in the oceans. This number is expected to increase.

The studies also revealed that 700,000 plastic fibers could be released into the atmosphere with each washing machine cycle.

Current water systems can not effectively filter all microplastic contamination, due to the variable size of the particles.

The amount of plastic waste in the world's oceans will outpace the fish by 2050 unless the world takes drastic measures to recycle it further, according to a report released in 2016.

More than 80 percent of the world's tap water is contaminated with plastic, revealed research published in September 2017.

The United States has the highest pollution rate at 93 percent, followed by Lebanon and India, according to experts at the University of Minnesota.

France, Germany and the United Kingdom have the lowest levels, however, still reach 72 percent.

In general, 83% of water samples from dozens of countries around the world contain microplastics.

Scientists warn that microplastics are so small that they could penetrate the organs.

Bottled water may not be a safer alternative, since scientists have found contaminated samples.

It has been discovered that creatures of all shapes and sizes have consumed plastics, either directly or indirectly.

Previous research also revealed that microplastics absorb toxic chemicals, which are then released into the intestines of animals.

The 120-meter section will finally be incorporated into the complete system, albeit with a new screen.

"Once the unit has been returned, the assembly will continue and, in essence, we will cut the system in half and place the remaining 480 meters of pipe in the two 60 meter sections," says Ocean Cleanup.

"Then, we will prepare System 001 for the Pacific trials that will take place in international waters, at 220-240 nautical miles from San Francisco, and that can last up to two months."

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