Home Australia Getaway star Catriona Rowntree is stopped on the street with a ‘strange’ request in Japan: ‘First time I’ve been asked this’

Getaway star Catriona Rowntree is stopped on the street with a ‘strange’ request in Japan: ‘First time I’ve been asked this’

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TV star Catriona Rowntree (right) was left stunned after being stopped on a street in Japan with an unusual request from a local.

Getaway presenter Catriona Rowntree was left stunned after she was stopped on the street in Japan with an unusual request from a local.

The 52-year-old TV presenter was filming in the city of Kanazawa when she was asked not to film anyone walking and eating.

‘This is the first time I’ve been asked this… and I understand why. Although I had some sushi (which was delicious) from a vending machine, we ate immediately and took the trash away,” Catriona revealed on Instagram.

Walking and eating is common among Australians, Americans and the English, but it is much less common in other countries.

Japanese regulations discourage people from walking and eating to avoid littering in the street. It is also considered rude.

TV star Catriona Rowntree (right) was left stunned after being stopped on a street in Japan with an unusual request from a local.

Catriona explained: “We were “responsible for our own trash” and the Japanese learn this concept as soon as they start kindergarten. Kids have to clean their own classrooms and that includes the bathrooms!

‘Locals don’t eat on the street, only tourists have takeaway coffee (of course there are exceptions, but we never saw a single local doing this) and the idea that showing people eating on the streets will encourage littering is a concept I can understand. ‘

Hundreds of Australians expressed their amazement at the discipline.

“What a great philosophy to live by,” said one man. “I wish Australia could adopt some of their customs.”

‘We couldn’t find seats in Shinjuku food courts. After chatting with the locals, the expectation was that you would bring food to the park to eat and relax and then take the trash home. We did it and it was very beautiful to see everyone interact, fly kites and play,” added another traveler.

A Japanese teacher shared her experience with Australian students.

‘I have taken many Australian students to Japan on tours and we explain this to them before they leave. Yes, it means that sometimes we carry food when we are starving until we find a place to sit,” he said.

“And yes, we start the day with half-empty backpacks so we have room for our trash, even if that includes a fish carcass because someone decided to eat a whole fish for lunch in the park.”

The 52-year-old TV presenter was filming in the city of Kanazawa when she was asked not to film anyone walking and eating.

The 52-year-old TV presenter was filming in the city of Kanazawa when she was asked not to film anyone walking and eating.

Tourists are encouraged to learn about traditions and accepted behavior in the country they are traveling to.

A Japanese store previously went viral after criticizing foreign tourists for being rude to staff, littering and having poor public etiquette.

an american traveler I came across a large sign in Tokyo that scolded tourists for having “bad manners” and “violating” convenience store rules.

The list was posted next to the store entrance.

Staff had to sort out tourists littering inside the store and put items on shelves in the wrong place, and became angry with those who opened the products before purchasing them.

Tourists would also unreasonably expect staff to speak English.

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