Health

Get ready for another round of Covid

Covid hospitalizations are up by a quarter in a week, official data shows amid concerns about a ‘triplemic’ disease hitting the crumbling NHS this winter.

The number of people admitted to hospitals in England infected with the virus rose above 600 on Monday – a 27 per cent increase on a weekly basis and the biggest increase in two months.

Meanwhile, the gold-standard Covid tracking also shows cases rising across the country after weeks of tumbling.

NHS bosses have warned the service is facing its ‘most challenging winter yet’, due to an influx of Covid and flu patients, along with the emergency room crisis. Strikes by tens of thousands of medics and staff shortages are expected to further exacerbate the pressure.

Hospitalization data from NHS England shows that 639 people infected with Covid were admitted to NHS care on November 28, up from 503 a week earlier. It marks the biggest weekly jump in two months

Meanwhile, On November 30, 4,964 People Who Tested Positive Were In Hospital Beds, Eight Percent More Than The Week Before

Meanwhile, on November 30, 4,964 people who tested positive were in hospital beds, eight percent more than the week before

And The Number Of Covid Patients In Intensive Care Increased By Nine Percent To 128 On November 30

And the number of Covid patients in intensive care increased by nine percent to 128 on November 30

NHS could close on December 20: unions plan to coordinate devastating pre-Christmas strikes

Striking unions plan to bring the struggling NHS to a standstill in the days before Christmas.

More than 200,000 nurses, paramedics and hospital workers were able to walk out at the same time after voting consecutively to strike over wages and benefits.

One of the unions orchestrating the unprecedented action – the Royal College of Nursing – has already pledged action on December 20.

Now GMB, Unite and Unison are said to be discussing joining the picket line on the same day, threatening to have a ‘maximum impact’ on an already overwhelmed NHS facing record ambulance delays, bed shortages, emergency room chaos and a chronic personnel crisis.

Senior insiders warned yesterday that fears the NHS will weather its worst ever winter are ‘quickly becoming a reality’.

Bosses have promised hospital trusts will do everything they can to mitigate risks to patients during walkouts, which could last into May.

But NHS England director Amanda Pritchard has warned that some surgeries and diagnostic scans will inevitably have to be cancelled.

Chemotherapy and kidney dialysis may also be delayed. The emergency room will not be disrupted, bosses have insisted. However, senior NHS sources still fear lives will be put in danger.

Hospitalization data from NHS England shows that 639 people infected with Covid were admitted to NHS care on November 28, up from 503 a week earlier.

It marks the biggest weekly jump in two months.

Admissions rose 36 percent week-over-week on Oct. 4 and began to decline shortly thereafter.

Meanwhile, on November 30, 4,964 people who tested positive were in hospital beds, eight percent more than the week before.

As with admissions, the number of patients had been falling for just over a month, after peaking at 10,688 on Oct. 17.

But this decline seems to have leveled off, with the numbers showing a slight increase in recent days.

And the number of Covid patients in intensive care increased by nine percent to 128 on November 30.

However, the numbers are still a fraction of the level they were earlier in the pandemic.

At the peak of daily admissions this year, about 2,300 people were admitted in March, while about 17,000 were hospitalized and 800 in intensive care in January.

In the darkest days of the Covid crisis, more than 4,000 were admitted in a single day, with 35,000 in hospital and 3,700 in intensive care.

Rates are highest among people age 85 and older, at 50.2 per 100,000.

Dr. Mary Ramsay, director of public health programs at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), said: ‘As we head into the coldest part of the year, we would expect the prevalence of Covid and other winter viruses to start to increase as people mingle more indoors. This is what the data is starting to show.

“Covid hospital admissions are highest in the oldest age groups, so it is especially important that everyone who is eligible comes forward to receive their booster shot.

“While Covid and flu may be mild infections for many, we should not forget that they can cause serious illness or even death for the most vulnerable in our communities.

“If you’re not feeling well this winter, please try to stay home and avoid contact with vulnerable people – this will help stop the spread of infection.”

And only a third of patients hospitalized with Covid were admitted mainly because they were unwell due to the virus. The remaining two-thirds were taken to the NHS for another reason, such as a broken leg, but happened to test positive.

However, all virus-positive patients still need to be isolated from those who do not have the virus, placing additional demands on staff who are already struggling to clear a record backlog in treatment.

It comes as data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) suggests that the number of Covid infections rose 7.9 percent in the week to November 21 after four weeks of decline.

The surveillance data, based on random sampling of thousands of people, shows that 873,200 people were carrying the virus, up from 809,200 a week earlier.

It means that one in 65 people (1.48 percent of the population) were carriers of the virus last week.

Meanwhile, cases fell in Wales, where 39,600 (one in 75 people) were infected, and the trend was uncertain in Scotland (91,100) and Northern Ireland (28,900).

It Comes As Data From The Office For National Statistics (Ons) Suggests That The Number Of Covid Infections Rose 7.9 Percent In The Week To November 21 After Four Weeks Of Decline. Surveillance Data, Based On Random Sampling Of Thousands Of People, Shows 873,200 People Were Carrying The Virus, Up From 809,200 A Week Earlier

It comes as data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) suggests that the number of Covid infections rose 7.9 percent in the week to November 21 after four weeks of decline. Surveillance data, based on random sampling of thousands of people, shows 873,200 people were carrying the virus, up from 809,200 a week earlier

1669999977 465 Prepare For Another Round Of Covid

Meanwhile, Cases Fell In Wales, Where 39,600 (One In 75 People) Were Infected, And The Trend Was Uncertain In Scotland (91,100) And Northern Ireland (28,900).

Meanwhile, cases fell in Wales, where 39,600 (one in 75 people) were infected, and the trend was uncertain in Scotland (91,100) and Northern Ireland (28,900).

In England, Cases Were Highest In The South West, Where 1.8 Per Cent Were Infected, Followed By The North East (1.7 Per Cent), The South East (1.7 Per Cent) And The East Midlands (1.6 Per Cent).

In England, cases were highest in the South West, where 1.8 per cent were infected, followed by the North East (1.7 per cent), the South East (1.7 per cent) and the East Midlands (1.6 per cent).

Meanwhile, Prevalence Was Highest Among 11 To 16 Year Olds (1.9 Percent) And 35 To 49 Year Olds (1.9 Percent).

Meanwhile, prevalence was highest among 11 to 16 year olds (1.9 percent) and 35 to 49 year olds (1.9 percent).

By Now, About Six In Ten People Over The Age Of 50 Have Had An Autumn Booster Vaccine

By now, about six in ten people over the age of 50 have had an autumn booster vaccine

Take-Up Is Highest Among 80 To 84 Year Olds (81 Percent), While It Was Lowest Among 50 To 54 Year Olds (39 Percent

Take-up is highest among 80 to 84 year olds (81 percent), while it was lowest among 50 to 54 year olds (39 percent

In England, cases were highest in the South West, where 1.8 per cent were infected, followed by the North East (1.7 per cent), the South East (1.7 per cent) and the East Midlands (1.6 per cent).

Meanwhile, prevalence was highest among 11 to 16 year olds (1.9 percent) and 35 to 49 year olds (1.9 percent).

Sarah Crofts, deputy director for analysis of Covid infection research, said: ‘Following a recent period of decline, we are once again seeing the number of infections in England starting to increase.

‘There have been cases in the West Midlands, London and much of southern England. We are also seeing a recent increase in positive cases among high school students, older teens, and young adults.

While Wales has seen a continued drop in positive cases, the trend is uncertain for the rest of the UK.

“We will monitor the data closely in the run-up to Christmas.”

It comes as an Omicron sub-variant, called BQ.1, is now the dominant strain in England, causing 50.4 per cent of infections, compared to 39 per cent a week ago.

Another strain, BA.2.75, is increasing in prevalence, the UKHSA said.

Professor Stephen Powis, medical director at NHS England, warned: ‘There is a new variant circulating – BQ1 – which is becoming the dominant one and it seems likely that this will drive further increases.

‘In some countries in Europe that have it, you can already see an increase in hospital admissions.

“That pressure will undoubtedly increase.”

By now, about six in ten people over the age of 50 have had an autumn booster vaccine. Take-up is highest among 80 to 84 year olds (81 percent), while it was lowest among 50 to 54 year olds (39 percent).

The UKHSA data, which covers vaccinations up to November 27, shows that an estimated 80.8% of people aged 80 and over have received a booster, along with 81.1% of those aged 75-79 and 78.3% of 70-74 year olds.

All people over 50 can make an appointment for an autumn booster of the Covid vaccine, provided they had their last shot at least three months ago.

Doses are also available for frontline health workers, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems.

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Merry

Merry C. Vega is a highly respected and accomplished news author. She began her career as a journalist, covering local news for a small-town newspaper. She quickly gained a reputation for her thorough reporting and ability to uncover the truth.

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