WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

George Washington was an “illiterate LIAR who cheated his way to the top,” claims new biography

George Washington was an “illiterate, unread” liar that the other Founding Fathers could not wait to see the back, claims a new biography of The Father of his Country.

Buying teeth from his slaves for a third of the market price, refusing to set them free and causing conflicts that ultimately led to the beginning of the “first world war” of humanity are among the many ethical and moral failures that the first president of the country has made, claims new book “You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington” by historian Alexis Coe.

The book was released this Presidents’ Day weekend to coincide with the broadcast of the new three-part series “Washington” from the History Channel, on which Coe was also a consulting producer.

‘You Never Forget Your First’ delves into the untold stories of stubborn, disobedient and conflict-hungry Washington, which Coe claims is misrepresented as a smart military leader who has lost more battles than he has won.

George Washington, the man whose myth says he couldn’t tell a lie, told a lot about it during his life, reveals a new book. The story “I can’t tell a lie” is even one of the greatest myths

Author Alexis Coe has published a new book “You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington” in which she disproves numerous myths surrounding George Washington

“You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington” is being released this Presidents’ Day weekend to clarify some myths surrounding him, including the lie about his wig

One of the greatest myths surrounding Washington was his wooden teeth, the founder who was famous when he was first initiated, had only one real tooth in his gums.

However, it was not wood that replaced his own chompers, but teeth that he bought from others, including those “bought” from his own slaves.

“At the age of eleven, he inherited ten slaves from his father, and over the next 56 years he sometimes relied on them to provide replacement teeth,” Coe writes.

“He paid his slaves for their teeth, but not at fair market value, [paying] two-thirds less than. . . offered in newspaper advertisements. “

When he could not buy teeth from a slave, his dentures were constructed from “pieces of hippopotamus, walrus, and elephant ivory.”

His slaves also helped Washington powder his fiery red hair, as well as collect, fluff and curl his hair in his favorite style. Although it is almost always claimed, no, he wasn’t wearing a wig.

Although it is known that Washington owned slaves and was not a man who fought for their equality, the extent to which he went to keep them may not have been widely shared.

George Washington talks to a slave on his estate in Mount Vernon, where he once hit a slave so hard that he “spun around like a top” for not chopping a piece of wood the way he liked

Washington did not wear a wig as expected, but had red hair, his slaves powdered white

Washington did not wear a wig as expected, but had red hair, his slaves powdered white

Washington did not wear a wig as expected, but had red hair, his slaves powdered white

He was so determined to keep his slaves in the Washington family that he left his wife Martha for fear of her life as their owner after his death.

It is generally reported that Washington freed his slaves in his will in 1799, but in fact he only gave freedom to his favorite slave, William Lee.

He left the others to Martha until her own death, which made her afraid they knew that freedom only came after she died.

“She didn’t feel their lives were safe in their hands,” Abigail Adams wrote in a letter to her sister.

Martha died three years after her husband was 70 years old after a long period of poor health.

While he was alive, Washington made sure that his slaves continued to work from dawn to dusk, hiring supervisors while they worked six days a week, a system he declared “very correct.”

He was also far from being an easy overseer, who once struck a slave so hard that he “spun around like a top” because he hadn’t chopped a piece of wood the way he liked.

The Washington slaves also had no chance of freedom when he went to great lengths to find holes that would hold them.

Martha Washington feared for her life after Washington left her slaves to her in her will

Martha Washington feared for her life after Washington left her slaves to her in her will

Martha Washington feared for her life after Washington left her slaves to her in her will

Washington often sent slaves back to his home in Mount Vernon, Vermont, to prevent them from giving them freedom if they lived in Pennsylvania for more than six months

Washington often sent slaves back to his home in Mount Vernon, Vermont, to prevent them from giving them freedom if they lived in Pennsylvania for more than six months

Washington often sent slaves back to his home in Mount Vernon, Vermont, to prevent them from giving them freedom if they lived in Pennsylvania for more than six months

The earliest verified portrait of George Washington shows him wearing the uniform of his Colonel of the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War in which he made a terrible mistake

The earliest verified portrait of George Washington shows him wearing the uniform of his Colonel of the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War in which he made a terrible mistake

The earliest verified portrait of George Washington shows him wearing the uniform of his Colonel of the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War in which he made a terrible mistake

When in Pennsylvania during his first term as president a law was passed that stated that he would be forced to free slaves if they lived in the state for more than six months, he forced his favorites to travel briefly to his home in Mount Vernon in Vermont to ensure that they remained his property.

The first president also claimed that he did not agree with selling slaves “as cattle,” who preferred to run the system to inherit them, but history shows that Washington was a hypocrite in that regard, and had dealt with the sale of slaves on three different occasions.

He even admitted that he sold a slave to the West Indies where life for slaves was even worse than in America and “almost guaranteed a premature death.”

One of the most groundbreaking revelations in the book, however, is the story of a political and military misstep that not only breaks down the image of Washington as the man “who can’t tell a lie”, but proves his role in inciting Europe’s Seven Year War .

Washington was 22 years old and fought for the British crown and was a major in the Virginia militia.

In 1753, the British governor of Virginia gave Robert Dinwiddie Washington a diplomatic mission in which “discretion and caution” were vital.

Image shows the death of French-Canadian officer Joseph Coulon de Villiers during the Battle of Jumonville Glen against British forces led by George Washington, 28 May 1754 - Washington manipulated a Seneca chief to start this fight and the French / British tensions to increase

Image shows the death of French-Canadian officer Joseph Coulon de Villiers during the Battle of Jumonville Glen against British forces led by George Washington, 28 May 1754 - Washington manipulated a Seneca chief to start this fight and the French / British tensions to increase

Image shows the death of French-Canadian officer Joseph Coulon de Villiers during the Battle of Jumonville Glen against British forces led by George Washington, 28 May 1754 – Washington manipulated a Seneca chief to start this fight and the French / British tensions to increase

N. Coulon De Jumonville Grave Marker with the location of N. Coulon de Jumonville's grave on Route 40, killed when Washington launched a fight when asked to use diplomacy

N. Coulon De Jumonville Grave Marker with the location of N. Coulon de Jumonville's grave on Route 40, killed when Washington launched a fight when asked to use diplomacy

N. Coulon De Jumonville Grave Marker with the location of N. Coulon de Jumonville’s grave on Route 40, killed when Washington launched a fight when asked to use diplomacy

Engraving of Washington and Christopher Gist meeting leader of the Seneca Tribe in 1900

Engraving of Washington and Christopher Gist meeting leader of the Seneca Tribe in 1900

Engraving of Washington and Christopher Gist meeting leader of the Seneca Tribe in 1900

Washington had to accompany the local Seneca tribe allies to a French fort to judge if they had settled on British land, but he threw aside diplomacy and preferred to manipulate the Seneca chief to fight. to start.

He told the chief that the French were planning to kill the Seneca tribe and achieved his “desired affection” when a fight began as soon as they reached the French camp.

Ten French soldiers were killed and 21 more imprisoned in an incident that helped intensify the ongoing war between Britain and France and eventually led to the French and Indian war, known as the Seven Year War in Europe.

“At the age of 22, Washington had committed a political mistake with global consequences,” Coe writes.

“If the American Revolution had not taken place, Washington would probably be remembered today as the instigator of the first world war of humanity, which lasted seven years.”

His own reputation would not suffer after the battle and Washington continued to be the glorified hero of the War of Independence thanks to his vast knowledge of the royal army.

Washington went from war hero to president and was more than deserved to serve as the leader of the new country.

He served two terms, but by the time he left office in 1797, most of the other Founding Fathers were done with him.

Washington began as an unnecessary struggle that led to the Seven Year War shown here

Washington began as an unnecessary struggle that led to the Seven Year War shown here

Washington began as an unnecessary struggle that led to the Seven Year War shown here

Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams, painted her with writing the Declaration of Independence, were tired of Washington at the end of his second tenure

Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams, painted her with writing the Declaration of Independence, were tired of Washington at the end of his second tenure

Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams, painted her with writing the Declaration of Independence, were tired of Washington at the end of his second tenure

“The president is lucky to get out just when the bubble bursts and lets others keep the bag,” an indignant Thomas Jefferson complained in a letter sent to James Madison that same year.

“He will have his usual luck to get the honor of the good art of others.”

Their anger continued until 1812, years after Washington’s death, when John Adams marked him as “too illiterate, unlearned, unread for his position and reputation.”

The worst, however, came in 1797, when James Monroe, who later became the fifth American president, wrote a full 473-page critic about the Washington government and the way he described American relations with warring Britain and France.

The Seven Year War ended in 1763, but the countries were still rivals.

Perhaps the most stubborn revelation in the rebutted myths about Washington is that his famous “I can’t tell a lie” rule to his father when cutting down the family’s cherry tree is completely fictional.

The story was invented by Mason Locke Weems, a broke-traveling priest and bookseller, before the 19th century for the book ‘The Life of Washington’.

.