George W. Bush will raise money for Republicans

Former President George W. Bush is moving forward in the election campaign to help Republicans in the medium term

Former President George W. Bush is hitting the road of fundraising for Republican candidates, even as he remains silent about the biggest elephant in the election: President Donald Trump.

Bush is re-emerging as party leaders raise the alarm that Republicans may lose both houses of Congress in midterm elections in November.

The former president will seek to boost both the candidates of the House of Representatives and those of the Senate in the elections that could make or break the possibilities of the Republicans to maintain the Congress.

But although he will publicly back the Republican contenders, he has kept quiet about the party's current leader: Trump.

Bush began his election campaign in his home state of Texas on Wednesday morning, Politico reported, with an event at Fort Worth Republican Congressman Will Hurd, who is running for re-election in a district that Trump lost in 2016.

Former President George W. Bush is moving forward in the election campaign to help Republicans in the medium term

Former President George W. Bush is moving forward in the election campaign to help Republicans in the medium term

Bush kept silent about President Trump

Bush kept silent about President Trump

Bush kept silent about President Trump

On Friday, Bush heads to Florida for a couple of events for Republican Rick Scott, who challenges Democratic Senator Bill Nelson in one of the most competitive Senate contests and spending in this cycle.

Next week, Bush will hold a fundraiser in Fort Worth for North Dakota Senate candidate Kevin Cramer on September 19 and, the next day, will have a Fundraising in Dallas for Texas Republican Congressman Pete Sessions.

The Sessions House district is one of the most competitive this fall and Bush has a personal and personal interest: Sessions is your congressman since he lives in the district and is where his presidential library is located.

Next month, Bush will organize fundraisers for two candidates for the Republican Senate: Josh Hawley of Missouri and Mike Braun of Indiana.

"While he prefers to consider himself retired from politics, President Bush recognizes how important it is to maintain the Senate and decided to help a few key candidates," Bush's spokesman Freddy Ford told Politico.

His return comes when the Republicans are publicly concerned about the possibilities of his party in November.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned on Tuesday that the midterms would be "very challenging" for Republicans and raised the alarm that they might struggle to stay in the Senate.

Independent political forecasters are giving Democrats a strong chance of regaining control of the House, but it is believed that Republicans are in a good position to maintain the Senate.

Political winds have been changing, however.

The reappearance of Bush occurs when former President Barack Obama returns to the campaign to push the Democrats, who are optimistic about their chances of retaking Congress.

McConnell, seen here with the president of the Republican Leaders, Donald Trump, and President Paul Ryan, is concerned about the chances of his party in the November elections

McConnell, seen here with the president of the Republican Leaders, Donald Trump, and President Paul Ryan, is concerned about the chances of his party in the November elections

McConnell, seen here with the president of the Republican Leaders, Donald Trump, and President Paul Ryan, is concerned about the chances of his party in the November elections

Speaking in public: Obama acknowledged that he was setting aside "a wise American tradition" when talking about his successor in the Oval Office said: "This time is different."

Speaking in public: Obama acknowledged that he was setting aside "a wise American tradition" when talking about his successor in the Oval Office said: "This time is different."

Speaking in public: Obama acknowledged that he was setting aside "a wise American tradition" when talking about his successor in the Oval Office said: "This time is different."

Traditionally, former presidents do not criticize the current head of the office.

Obama made an exception, however.

& # 39; You should worry about our current course. They should want to see a restoration of honesty, decency and legality in our government, "said the former president.

"We are supposed to face discrimination, and we are sure that it is supposed to be raised clearly and unequivocally with Nazi sympathizers, how hard can that be, saying that the Nazis are bad," he said.

.