Gen Mark Milley tried to calm Trump after team refused to use military to crush George Floyd protests

‘When guys start bombing Fort Sumter, you’re going to have a riot’: How General Milley tried to calm Trump down after calling his team ‘f**ked’ for refusing to use the military to suppress George Floyd’s protests

  • Then-President Trump reportedly exploded at General Mark Milley and Defense Secretary Mark Esper as he tried to quell BLM protests last June
  • When the officials refused to deploy troops to contain the protesters, Trump scolded, “You are all confused. Each of you is f**ked up’
  • The eruption was revealed in the book Only I Can Solve It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year by Reporters Carol D. Leonnig and Philip Rucker
  • According to the book, Trump pointed to the race riots of the 1960s to justify using troops to restore order, which Milley immediately dismissed.
  • ‘Mr. President, nothing compares to the summer of sixty-eight,” Milley said, according to the book. ‘It doesn’t even come close’
  • Trump initially wanted to invoke the Insurrection Act, which would allow him to deploy troops across the country to end any civil disorder or insurgency
  • “You don’t have a rebellion,” Milley told Trump. ‘If guys show up in gray and start bombing Fort Sumter, you’re going to have a revolt’

Donald Trump exploded at General Mark Milley and Defense Secretary Mark Esper after they refused to deploy active troops to quell protests over the death of George Floyd in June, a new book has revealed.

At the time, both Milley and Esper wanted to avoid that option, which led to the then-president cursing his top military advisers, according to a new book by Washington Post reporters Carol D. Leonnig and Philip Rucker.

“You guys are all confused,” Trump said, according to the book titled, I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year. “Every one of you is screwed.”

Trump’s plans were to make Milley the leader of an operation to restore order, but Milley explained that he had no operational role, and then the former president lost it.

According to the book, Trump pointed to the race riots of the 1960s to justify using troops to restore order, which Milley immediately dismissed.

‘Mr. President, nothing compares to the summer of sixty-eight,” Milley said, according to the book. “It’s not even close.”

While trying to quell protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death, former President Donald Trump (center) reportedly exploded at General Mark Milley (left) and Defense Secretary Mark Esper, (right) after his demand for deployment of active troops was rejected.

Trump's plans were to make Milley the leader of an operation to restore order after the protests, but Milley explained that he had no operational role, and then the former president lost it.  Pictured here are dozens of protesters gathering for a Black Lives Matter march in Washington, DC following the death of George Floyd

Trump’s plans were to make Milley the leader of an operation to restore order after the protests, but Milley explained that he had no operational role, and then the former president lost it. Pictured here are dozens of protesters gathering for a Black Lives Matter march in Washington, DC following the death of George Floyd

Former Trump adviser Stephen Miller stated the protests were “an insurrection,” then Milley pointed to a portrait of former President Abraham Lincoln and said, “Mr. President, that man had a rebellion. You have no rebellion.’

“If guys show up in gray and start bombing Fort Sumter, you’re going to have a revolt,” Milley added.

Trump initially wanted to invoke the Insurrection Act, which would allow him to deploy troops across the country to end any civil disorder or insurgency, but Milley and Esper disagreed.

Hours later, Trump (far left) along with Milley (far right), Esper (center) and several other advisers walked from the White House complex to nearby St. John's Episcopal Church, in what is now considered an infamous photo-op. .

Hours later, Trump (far left) along with Milley (far right), Esper (center) and several other advisers walked from the White House complex to nearby St. John’s Episcopal Church, in what is now considered an infamous photo-op. .

Many protesters were given tear gas and aggressively pushed for no apparent reason as Trump delivered a speech in front of St. John's Episcopal Church nearby

Many protesters were given tear gas and aggressively pushed for no apparent reason as Trump delivered a speech in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church nearby

According to the book, that reaction did not go down well with the former president.

“What do you think this looks like for hostile countries?” Trump fired back. “They see that we can’t even control our own capital and the space around the White House!”

Hours later, Trump, along with Milley, Esper and several other advisers, walked from the White House complex to nearby St. John’s Episcopal Church, in what is now considered an infamous photo op.

In the photo, Trump held up a Bible in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church, without praying or quoting a verse, while dozens of protesters were forcibly removed from nearby Lafayette Park.

“We have the best country in the world,” Trump said. “Keep it nice and safe.”

Many protesters were given tear gas for no apparent reason and were pushed aggressively.

In June 2021, the Inspector General of the Department of the Interior later determined that the U.S. Park Police and Secret Service said they cleared the park to install anti-scale fences and not for Trump’s photo shoot.

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