Geminids meteor shower of 120 shooting stars to illuminate the airspace

Britons could be treated to an amazing show of 120 shooting stars per hour in showers that will reach their peak later this week. The spectacular event coincides with a space rock which is called the Christmas comet and which is tipped as the clearest of the year tonight.

Geminids meteor shower of 120 shooting stars to light up the sky this week (and it coincides with 2018 & # 39; s brightest passing space rock that is called the Christmas comet tonight)

  • Britons treated themselves to a spectacular show of 120 shooting stars per hour in showers
  • The shower will coincide with the space rock that is called the Christmas comet
  • Geminids meteor shower will be visible and consist of colorful falling stars
  • With office, people are hoping to catch a glimpse of the event to go to an open space away from street lighting

Victoria Bell for mailonline

Britons will be treated to an amazing show visible to the naked eye of 120 shooting stars per hour in showers that will come to their peak later in the next two days.

The spectacular event will coincide with a space rock called the Christmas comet, tipped to be the brightest of the year, turning this evening over.

Those who want to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet, who is ready to swarm past the earth, will have to go to a dark place and look to the south.

Meanwhile, the Geminids meteor shower will consist of multicolored shooting stars visible on the ground on Thursday and Friday.

Viewers hope to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet and the meteor shower is advised by the Met Office to go to a clearing away from streetlights.

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Britons could be treated to an amazing show of 120 shooting stars per hour in showers that will reach their peak later this week. The spectacular event coincides with a space rock which is called the Christmas comet and which is tipped as the clearest of the year tonight.

Britons could be treated to an amazing show of 120 shooting stars per hour in showers that will reach their peak later this week. The spectacular event coincides with a space rock which is called the Christmas comet and which is tipped as the clearest of the year tonight.

& # 39; Stargazers will be looking for a clear, cloudless sky to have the best possible chance to catch a glimpse of the meteor shower & # 39 ;, said a spokesperson for the office.

Ideally, a location away from light pollution will be of use. & # 39;

For those in areas with low light pollution, no smog and clear skies, the Geminids are visible to the naked eye without the need for specialist equipment.

The fluorescent blue colored Christmas comet skips within 7.1 million miles of our planet, or 30 times the distance to the moon.

The Christmas comet (circled) seen from Dorset. The meteor shower of Geminids will consist of multicolored shooting stars that can be seen from the ground on Thursday and Friday. Viewers hope to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet, depicted and the meteor shower are advised by the Met Office to go to an open place, away from streetlights

The Christmas comet (circled) seen from Dorset. The meteor shower of Geminids will consist of multicolored shooting stars that can be seen from the ground on Thursday and Friday. Viewers hope to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet, depicted and the meteor shower are advised by the Met Office to go to an open place, away from streetlights

The Christmas comet (circled) seen from Dorset. The meteor shower of Geminids will consist of multicolored shooting stars that can be seen from the ground on Thursday and Friday. Viewers hope to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet, depicted and the meteor shower are advised by the Met Office to go to an open place, away from streetlights

On the photo a picture has been taken of the Carlisle Memorial Column on the Castle Howard estate in Yorkshire. The heavenly screen is sometimes referred to as the king of meteor showers, because it is one of the best of the year, with as many as 150 shooting stars shooting through the air every hour

On the photo a picture has been taken of the Carlisle Memorial Column on the Castle Howard estate in Yorkshire. The heavenly screen is sometimes referred to as the king of meteor showers, because it is one of the best of the year, with as many as 150 shooting stars shooting through the air every hour

On the photo a picture was taken of the Carlisle Memorial Column on the Castle Howard estate in Yorkshire during a Geminid shower last year. The display is sometimes called the King of Meteor Showers & # 39; called

THE GEMINIDS

The Geminid meteor shower is sometimes called the King of Meteordouchers because it is one of the best of the year, with up to 150 shooting stars shooting through the air every hour.

The debris burns when it enters the earth's atmosphere and it looks like it's a "falling star". is.

The shower happens when the earth crosses paths with a trail of rocky debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon.

Tonight there will still be about 15 to 30 hours per hour, and by Friday, only one or two, Space.com writes.

They are clear and have a yellowish hue, making them clear and easy to recognize.

Geminid meteors travel fairly slowly, at about 22 miles (35 km) per second.

Meteor showers occur when the earth folds through dust and particles of a passing comet or asteroid.

The pieces burn when they enter our atmosphere and create the bright colors. Traditionally, asteroids made of stone and comets are usually made of ice.

Geminid meteor showers occur when they move through the debris of asteroid 3200 Phaeton while rotating around the sun.

The Phaeton is an Apollo asteroid with a path that brings it closer to the sun than any other named asteroid.

The three-mile-wide object, which NASA describes as a "rock comet", was discovered in 1983 by two British scientists who studied NASA satellite imagery.

It was originally divided, but because of the eccentric orbit it looks more like that of a comet and it comes well in the orbit of Mercury, the planet closest to the sun.

The meteors move at a speed of 22 miles per second and burn at about 24 miles above the earth.

Another unusual characteristic of the Geminids is that they can shine in different colors. Usually glowing white, they can also appear yellow, blue, green or red.

  Geminid meteor showers occur when they move through the debris of asteroid 3200 Phaeton while rotating around the sun. The Phaeton is an apollo asteroid with a orbit that brings it closer to the sun than any other called asteroid

  Geminid meteor showers occur when they move through the debris of asteroid 3200 Phaeton while rotating around the sun. The Phaeton is an apollo asteroid with a orbit that brings it closer to the sun than any other called asteroid

Geminid meteor showers occur when they move through the debris of asteroid 3200 Phaeton while rotating around the sun. The Phaeton is an apollo asteroid with a orbit that brings it closer to the sun than any other called asteroid

HOW CAN I SEE THE CHRISTMAS COMET AND THE GEMINID METEOR SHOWER OF 2018?

Britons who want to catch a glimpse of the Christmas comet and the meteor shower are advised to do the following by the Met Office:

The naked eye is the best of a place at ideal distance from street lighting and at a height

Do not look through a telescope or binoculars, because you will probably miss it

Get away from light sources and sit on a camping chair while you gaze at the sky.

Give your eyes 20 to 30 minutes to adjust to the light (do not use a flashlight or look at your phone).

For the Christmas comet tonight you have to look to the south

Look for Geminids' shower vaguely in the direction of Gemini in the northern hemisphere

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