Gay couple told to remove their Pride flag cover their entire house with rainbow floodlights

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A Racine, Wisconsin couple who was told to remove their Pride flag from their home is going viral with their very clever loophole.

Memo Fachino, 35, and Lance Mier, 36 – who have been married for five years and together for eight – have had the same rainbow flag hanging outside their home since 2016.

But after the Home Owners Association voted on a new rule to ban all flags in the neighborhood, a neighbor called to file a complaint about their rainbow flag — prompting Fachino and Mier to set up rainbow-colored floodlights all over the place. front of their house.

Proud home!  Memo Fachino, 35, and Lance Mier, 36, who have been married for five years, have had the same Pride flag outside their home since 2016.

Proud home! Memo Fachino, 35, and Lance Mier, 36, who have been married for five years, have had the same Pride flag outside their home since 2016.

New rule: Due to conflicting political flags in the area, the Homeowners Association has instituted a new rule banning all flags except the American flag

New rule: Due to conflicting political flags in the area, the Homeowners Association has instituted a new rule banning all flags except the American flag

The couple posted about their creative idea on reddit, where their post has generated tens of thousands of upvotes.

“Because some neighbors are flying BLM flags, Thin Blue Line flags and other opinion flags, our HOA decided last month that we can only fly the American flag, and nothing else,” they wrote.

“The day after the decision, we received an email that someone reported our Pride flag (which we had in our house since 2016) and that we should remove it,” the continued.

They obeyed and removed the flag – but did not drop the matter completely.

“When we went through our new rules, we noticed that removable lamps are allowed indefinitely, so… we bought 6 colored floodlights and we washed our house in proud colors,” they continued.

‘Slightly less subtle than our simple flag. Much more fun for anyone who complains about the flag itself and what it stands for,” they concluded.

Loophole: After the rule went into effect, a neighbor complained about their flag and they were told to remove it, so they set up lights that created a rainbow in front of their house

Loophole: After the rule went into effect, a neighbor complained about their flag and they were told to remove it, so they set up lights that created a rainbow in front of their house

Peace: they 'try not to hold it to anyone', but 'believe it's important to express ourselves and have a visible representation'

Peace: they ‘try not to hold it to anyone’, but ‘believe it’s important to express ourselves and have a visible representation’

Fachino, who sits on the board of the HOA, said he fully understood the purpose of the new rule, which is to deal with belligerent political flags nearby.

“The board has adopted this rule to be proactive and avoid friction between neighbors who may be flying opposing political or opinion flags,” he told the paper. BBC. “It’s a simple rule that applies to all of us equally.”

“We don’t feel it was made to prevent us from flying our flag or trying to remove it before Pride month,” he added.

When the couple came up with their spotlight plan, it was only to find another way to celebrate Pride — not because they felt like the target of the rule.

“We try not to hang it on anyone,” Fachino added to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “We don’t feel attacked or attacked in our community. It was just a fun way for us to show our individuality and support in a way that didn’t break any HOA rules.”

However, they were told to remove the flag only after a neighbor complained about the rule violation.

Yes!  Fachino says other neighbors supported the lights

Yes! Fachino says other neighbors supported the lights

Popular: They posed over their house on Reddit and went viral

Popular: They posed over their house on Reddit and went viral

“There are a few other flags flying nearby that haven’t been dropped, mainly because no one reported them,” he said.

“For whatever reason, a neighbor happened to check in with me. I don’t know the reason for it and haven’t reported everyone. We also did not try to make a big statement (against the association).’

Still, Fachino says other neighbors have supported the lights.

“The neighbors I’ve heard of have supported me,” he said. “I didn’t share it on the neighborhood app, nor did I try to make a big point for everyone to know about it. I just thought it was a funny loophole, and it just started from there.”

The pair aren’t sure how long they’ll keep the lights on, but expect them to last at least the entire month of June.

“We think it’s important to express ourselves and have a visible representation,” Fachino told the Huffington Post.

“We are proud to be able to do this,” he said. “We recognize this privilege. We are convinced that diversity and self-expression enhance the neighborhood and make it a more inclusive place to live.’

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