Home US Fury as thousands of influencers descend on new holiday spot for Insta-perfect pic despite signs saying NO photos

Fury as thousands of influencers descend on new holiday spot for Insta-perfect pic despite signs saying NO photos

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Hoomaluhia Botanical Garden's popularity has skyrocketed in recent years following a viral image showing its picturesque entrance – a scene adorned with lush palm trees and the backdrop of towering mountain ridges (similar to this stock photo).

Thousands of influencers are flocking to Hawaii’s most ‘Instagrammable’ spots to snap a photo, despite signs saying no photos can be taken.

Hoomaluhia Botanical Garden, nestled beneath the majestic Koolau Mountain Range, is Oahu’s largest botanical oasis.

The garden’s popularity skyrocketed in recent years following a viral image showing its picturesque entrance: a scene adorned with lush palm trees and the backdrop of towering mountain ridges.

It quickly became known as one of the best places in Hawaii to capture stunning photos. The number of tourists increased from 250,000 in 2017 to more than 550,000 in 2022.

Amid the influx of visitors looking for the perfect shot, a general disregard for safety and rules has also emerged. Many visitors flock to replicate the iconic photo, despite frequent “no photos” and “no parking” signs posted to discourage such behavior.

Hoomaluhia Botanical Garden’s popularity has skyrocketed in recent years following a viral image showing its picturesque entrance – a scene adorned with lush palm trees and the backdrop of towering mountain ridges (similar to this stock photo).

Amid the influx of visitors looking for the perfect shot, a disregard for safety and rules has also emerged. Many visitors flock to replicate the iconic photo, despite the presence of posters of

Amid the influx of visitors looking for the perfect shot, a disregard for safety and rules has also emerged. Many visitors flock to replicate the iconic photo, despite the presence of “no photo taking” and “no parking” signs posted to discourage such behavior.

Joshlyn Sand, director of the Honolulu Botanical Garden, emphasized the persistent problem and compared it to tourists ignoring the rules at the entrances to iconic national parks.

“It’s still a big problem,” said Joshlyn Sand, director of the Honolulu Botanical Garden. SF DOOR. ‘People will just ignore the signs. They will literally set up a photograph, you know, right next to the sign.

The problem has led to a congested entrance, which lacks designated pedestrian lanes or bicycle lanes.

In addition to congestion, there are also inconveniences and even safety concerns for others.

Sand emphasizes the importance of safety, recounting near misses and traffic congestion caused by vehicles stopped for impromptu photographs.

‘We’ve had some tough times. No one has been hurt that I know of, but it sure has gotten sticky before,” Sand told SFGATE. Traffic congestion, caused by visitors stopping their cars at the entrance to take a photo, also affects neighbors who use the road.

Sand said that despite this, photography is welcome in other parts of the garden, which spans 400 acres and features diverse collections of plants from various regions.

Kaneohe, Hoomaluhia, which means “a place of peace and tranquility” in Hawaiian, also offers weekend overnight trips and hiking trails around a serene lake.

It was built by the US Army Corps of Engineers to mitigate flooding in 1982.

There are alternative photography locations such as Nui and Lehua that offer uninterrupted views of the Koolau Mountains and surrounding landscapes.

Although the number of visitors exceeds 550,000 per year, efforts are being made to manage the impact through possible rates and reservation systems.

The garden quickly became known as one of the best places in Hawaii to capture stunning photos. The number of tourists increased from 250,000 in 2017 to more than 550,000 in 2022.

The garden quickly became known as one of the best places in Hawaii to capture stunning photos. The number of tourists increased from 250,000 in 2017 to more than 550,000 in 2022.

The problem has led to a congested entrance, which lacks designated pedestrian lanes or bicycle lanes. In addition to congestion, this is enough to pose inconvenience and even safety concerns to others.

The problem has led to a congested entrance, which lacks designated pedestrian lanes or bicycle lanes. In addition to congestion, this is enough to pose inconvenience and even safety concerns to others.

Nathan Serota of the City and County of Honolulu Parks and Recreation Department emphasized the importance of striking a balance between welcoming tourists and preserving natural beauty.

‘[It’s about finding] “There are ways to manage these tourist destinations and natural resources so that they are attractive, but at the same time, manage them so that we can keep them at that high quality and really maintain that natural beauty and that environmental attractiveness,” Serota told SFGATE. .

“It’s about finding that balance between welcoming people but also mitigating the impacts of that number of people on the environment and neighborhoods,” Serota said.

Sand urged visitors to approach these spaces carefully, advocating for responsible tourism to ensure the preservation of these beautiful environments for future generations.

“That’s all we really ask people to keep in mind is to be more aware of these kinds of things when they travel places,” Sand said. “And that would make things better for everyone.”

‘Touron’ is a coined term that is a combination of ‘tourist’ and ‘jerk’.

'Touron' is a coined term that is a combination of 'tourist' and 'mouron'. Tourons' account of Yellowstone serves as an example of 'what not to do', as the parks' rules and regulations are linked in the bio. for his almost 500,000 followers

‘Touron’ is a coined term that is a combination of ‘tourist’ and ‘mouron’. Tourons’ account of Yellowstone serves as an example of ‘what not to do’, as the parks’ rules and regulations are linked in the bio. for his almost 500,000 followers

In the photo: A tourist risks his life climbing the rails in Yellowstone National Park to take a snapshot.

In the photo: A tourist risks his life climbing the rails in Yellowstone National Park to take a snapshot.

An Instagram account titled 'Tourons of Yellowstone' (pictured) compiles all the cases in which a 'touron', the combination of a 'tourist' and a 'mouron', commits another incredibly stupid charade, desecrating the rules of the park in time and again

An Instagram account titled ‘Tourons of Yellowstone’ (pictured) compiles all the cases in which a ‘touron’, the combination of a ‘tourist’ and a ‘mouron’, commits another incredibly stupid charade, desecrating the rules of the park in time and again

It is commonly used to describe tourists who break the rules to take an “Instagram-worthy” photo in national parks around the country.

Webcams around Yellow Stone National Park have captured multiple cases where ignorant tourists have put themselves in harm’s way for various reasons, ranging from wanting to get close to wildlife or scaling barriers to get a better selfie.

An Instagram account titled ‘Tourons of Yellowstone’ compiles all the cases in which a ‘touron’, the combination of ‘tourist’ and ‘mouron’, commits another incredibly stupid charade, desecrating the park’s rules over and over again.

The account serves as an example of “what not to do,” as the park’s rules and regulations are linked in the bios of its nearly 500,000 followers.

It is open to presentations as a way to encourage visitors to hold each other accountable.

A recently sent clip shows three tourists risking their lives for a snapshot.

“I was at Upper Falls Middle Brink and three people decided to climb the stone wall and get to the side of the mountain to get better photos,” the clip’s title read, quoting the description of the user’s submission.

‘This video was sent to the authorities. Please don’t climb the railings! This is so dangerous! And if you slip, fall and die, then someone will have to risk their life to go get your body!’ reads the rest of the title. ‘Please follow the rules and stay safe! You don’t want to end up in the new edition of ‘Death in Yellowstone’.

In another recent clip from the park’s Old Faithful webcam, footage shows a touron within arm’s reach of a bison, venturing off the established trail to interact with wildlife.

“I was yelling at my computer,” said Connie Witte Reynolds Cowboy State Diary, who watched the scene unfold in a classroom with his students. ‘In fact, a little later there was another bison there with this one. A person came from the other direction and walked within arm’s reach.’

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