Fury as hosts of £26,000 St Paul’s Girls’ School talk about gender-changing children

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Leading £26,000-a-year St Paul’s Girls’ School asks ‘diversity’ researchers at Princeton University to talk to pupils about changing their gender – sparking outrage from parents

  • St Paul’s Girls’ School in West London hosted two researchers from Princeton
  • The £26,000-a-year private school newsletter briefed parents on the conversation
  • Several girls have asked to wear boy clothes and be addressed with boy names

The school's senior mistress, Sarah Fletcher, said: 'There have been a small number of students in recent years who have wanted to use gender-neutral pronouns or expressed a desire to explore transition'

The school’s senior mistress, Sarah Fletcher, said: ‘There have been a small number of students in recent years who have wanted to use gender-neutral pronouns or expressed a desire to explore transition’

A leading private school has caused a stir after inviting American researchers to talk to students about gender-changing.

The £26,000-a-year St Paul’s Girls’ School in West London hosted two researchers from Princeton University’s Human Diversity Laboratory, who discussed research that reportedly showed positive results for girls living as boys and vice versa.

The school’s newsletter briefed parents on the conversation, telling them that the university’s findings on the topic of children’s mental health while living as the opposite sex “are paramount in light of the recent ban on hormone therapy.” in Arkansas for under-18s’ , The times reports.

Parents are now concerned that some girls may want to wear binders to flatten their breasts or take puberty-inhibiting drugs to stop their periods.

Several girls have already asked to wear boys’ clothes and be addressed with boys’ names according to the school’s “gender identity protocol”.

The school’s high-ranking mistress Sarah Fletcher said: “There has been a small number of students in recent years who have wanted to use gender-neutral pronouns or expressed a desire to explore transition. In both cases, our response was respectful, child-specific and pastorally sensitive.’

One parent who had complained said, “I’m furious about this. Why did these researchers insist on talking to the girls about “trans youth” in the school, where there is already a problem with girls wanting to become boys?

‘Some staff have suggested that girls who say they want to be a boy should go to the UK’s NHS Gender Identity Clinic, which until recently gave girls under 16 drugs to suppress their puberty, with who knows what consequences. ‘

The £26,000-a-year St Paul's Girls' School in west London hosted two researchers from Princeton University's human diversity lab, who discussed research that reportedly showed positive outcomes for girls living as boys and vice versa.

The £26,000-a-year St Paul's Girls' School in west London hosted two researchers from Princeton University's human diversity lab, who discussed research that reportedly showed positive outcomes for girls living as boys and vice versa.

The £26,000-a-year St Paul’s Girls’ School in west London hosted two researchers from Princeton University’s human diversity lab, who discussed research that reportedly showed positive outcomes for girls living as boys and vice versa.

Psychology graduates Stats Atwood and Ashley Jordan had lectured last month on the “transyouth project” – a study of 300 children aged three to 12.

The boys and girls changed their pronouns, names and sometimes the way they dressed and styled their hair.

The children were no more depressed and only slightly more anxious than their peers, according to the study, led by Professor Kristina Olson, with whom Atwood and Jordan work.

It goes against other studies that have shown depression and other conditions in children who want to change sex.

A study for the NHS’s Tavistock Clinic had found a higher rate of suicidal tendencies among those under 16 who received puberty-blocking treatment.

Ms Fletcher said in a statement that the lecture was jointly organized by two student societies – the Science Society and the LGBTQ+ school Spectrum.

She added that there was “nothing about encouraging girls to seek menopause,” and they would “always advise parents to refer to specialists outside the school’.

Mrs Fletcher said thathis talk was ‘just a presentation of Princeton University’s research, which has already been published and is in the public domain’

Alumni of the school include actresses Joely Richardson and Rachel Weisz, along with TV host Susanna Reid.

MailOnline has contacted St Paul’s for comment.

The Tavistock NHS trust clinic in London had in the past referred children as young as 12 for puberty blockers, but last year the Supreme Court ruled that children under 16 were unlikely to be able to give informed consent.

Judges said clinics needed court approval because the treatment was experimental.

Princeton University Human Diversity Lab: Studying ‘Prejudice and Discrimination’

Princeton University’s Human Diversity Lab (HUDL) studies social identities, “prejudice and discrimination,” and children’s “understanding of inequality.”

It boasts that its ‘Trans Youth Project’ is the first large-scale, national, longitudinal study to date on ‘socially transformed transgender children’.

The lab is currently recruiting new families to participate in its research on gender development in New Jersey and in the US.

Stats Atwood, one of the graduating students who gave the talk at St Paul’s, is working with Dr. Kristina Olson exploring the ‘development, perceptions and implications of gender diversity’.

Born in China, Atwood grew up in eastern Massachusetts, having previously studied psychology and violin at Oberlin College & Conservatory and the University of Washington.

Statistics Atwood

Statistics Atwood

Ashley Jordan

Ashley Jordan

Graduated psychology students Stats Atwood (left) and Ashley Jordan (right) gave the lecture last month about the ‘trans youth project’

Gender-neutral pronouns are used in Atwood’s HUDL profile, which says, “Outside the lab, you can watch them play the violin, explore nature, or snack voraciously.”

Ashley Jordan, the second graduate student to give the Westminster talk, received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Yale University, where he has worked on assessing social cognition in infancy and early childhood.

Her work explores mechanisms ‘underlying our emerging evaluations of social life, with a particular emphasis on how similarity messages guide children’s social preferences and inform their inferences about the structure of social groups’.

Her profile says she wants to apply these ideas to the ‘study of gender development among, and prejudice against, gender non-conforming youth’.

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