Funerals to be held all over Kabul after ISIS suicide attacks on 170 dead at airport

As the Afghan victims of the horrific suicide bombing at Kabul airport were buried, friends and relatives spoke of “the best and brightest of their generation being cruelly brought down in their prime.”

The faces of the tragic victims, mostly young, came from all corners of Afghan society, but they all shared the hope for a better life outside the Taliban rule.

The funerals taking place in the city today have ranged from that of a talented young female journalist to a member of the Afghan national taekwondo team.

Several families were devastated by the loss of more than one cousin or sibling, and one family lost four young men.

Afghan TV host Muslim Shirzad, 30, who tweeted many of the images from this tragic gallery of laughing victims, said family and friends had contacted him with the sad news.

Najma Saddique, 21, from Kabul (pictured left) and her sister Zuhal (right).  Ms Saddique was in her third year of journalism training at the city's university when she was killed in the horrific suicide bombing at Kabul airport on Thursday.

Najma Saddique, 21, from Kabul (pictured left) and her sister Zuhal (right). Ms Saddique was in her third year of journalism training at the city’s university when she was killed in the horrific suicide bombing at Kabul airport on Thursday.

Pictured: A Taliban fighter stands guard at the site of the August 26 double suicide bombing that killed dozens of people at Kabul airport on August 27, 2021

Pictured: A Taliban fighter stands guard at the site of the August 26 double suicide bombing that killed dozens of people at Kabul airport on August 27, 2021

Pictured: A Taliban fighter stands guard at the site of the August 26 double suicide bombing that killed dozens of people at Kabul airport on August 27, 2021

He told MailOnline: ‘The generation that should have been the hope of Afghanistan has now become a generation of frustration and fugitives.

Before the return of the Taliban, Kabul was the beating heart of Afghanistan’s talented new generation, but now it seems like a ghost town

“Despite the threat of violence in Afghanistan, we had the motivation to move forward and be part of change in our country, but now we are just the audience at a horror movie and we have no control over the outcome.

“The youth of Afghanistan saw what happened two weeks ago as history repeating itself – a history they felt no part of and wanted to escape.

“These young people felt they had no choice but to feel themselves out of Taliban-controlled Afghanistan, but instead they were cut down in their prime.”

Teenager Mohammad Jan Soltani had fought his way into the national taekwondo team but was killed in the outrage, according to Svaka News Agency.

The Afghan Taekwondo Federation has confirmed that Mohammad Jan Soltani (pictured), a member of the national taekwondo team, was killed in a suicide attack in Kabul on Thursday.

The Afghan Taekwondo Federation has confirmed that Mohammad Jan Soltani (pictured), a member of the national taekwondo team, was killed in a suicide attack in Kabul on Thursday.

Wasiq Ehsan, a third-year literature and modern language student at Kabul University, who also lost his life

Wasiq Ehsan, a third-year literature and modern language student at Kabul University, who also lost his life

The Afghan Taekwondo Federation has confirmed that Mohammad Jan Soltani (pictured), a member of the national taekwondo team, was killed in a suicide attack in Kabul on Thursday. Pictured right: Wasiq Ehsan, a third-year literature and modern language student at Kabul University, who also died

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity. dr. Khalid Raheen (top photo) and his sons Milad and Ferdaws Raheen (bottom photo), both in their early twenties, were all killed in the attack

Najma Saddique, 21, from Kabul, was in her third year of journalism training at the city’s university, but her attitude in front of the camera had already landed her an on-screen job on one of Afghanistan’s morning programs.

A friend told MailOnline: ‘The idea of ​​a young woman appearing on TV was previously unimaginable under the Taliban, but Najma and her sister Zuhal, who is also a journalist, don’t remember that time.

“Najma was so hopeless when the Taliban took over Afghanistan and she decided to try to flee the country with her brother Wasiq, 19, and her cousin.”

The friend said the three wanted to escape to Canada or the United States. “She just wanted to be safe. It was the third time they were at the airport trying to get away.’

Zuhal, 22, who is now grieving with her parents and another brother, said: ‘This has left us without any hope – our family is torn apart.’

Four young men, all members of the same family named Taher, Naseer, Emran and Bilal, also paid with their lives after joining the mob of desperate people trying to flee their country.

Four young men, all members of the same family named Taher, Naseer, Emran and Bilal, also paid with their lives after joining the mob of desperate people trying to flee their country.  Pictured: A composite image posted to Twitter showing the four family members

Four young men, all members of the same family named Taher, Naseer, Emran and Bilal, also paid with their lives after joining the mob of desperate people trying to flee their country.  Pictured: A composite image posted to Twitter showing the four family members

Four young men, all members of the same family named Taher, Naseer, Emran and Bilal, also paid with their lives after joining the mob of desperate people trying to flee their country. Pictured: A composite image posted to Twitter showing the four family members

Abdul Khaber Ibrahimkhail, was a 17-year-old Frisbee enthusiast from Kabul who dreamed of coming to London, according to his older brother Moner, 27.

“My brother first got a passport three months ago when the situation started to deteriorate,” said Mr Ibrahimkhail, who fled to Austria a year ago.

“Before that time, he saw a future here and really wanted to be someone in his own country. He was in Year 11 and was a member of the Afghan Frisbee Federation.

“He went to the airport in the first wave of people with our sister and her husband, who was also injured. My family didn’t find my brother’s body until the next day.’

The Raheens were another family destroyed by the terrorist atrocity. dr. Khalid Raheen and his sons Milad and Ferdaws Raheen, both in their early twenties, were all killed in the attack.

Wasiq Ehsan was a third-year literature and modern language student at Kabul University, who also died.

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