Fully vaccinated adults had a 91% lower risk of contracting COVID-19

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The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines significantly reduce the risk of contracting the disease, a new report finds.

People who were partially or fully immunized with the two-dose injection were up to 91 percent less likely to contract the disease, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found.

In addition, vaccinated participants were less likely to develop symptoms, test positive for more than a week, or have high levels of the virus in their noses.

It comes as the U.S. sees vaccination rates plummet amid President Joe Biden’s goal to have 70 percent of U.S. adults on at least their first COVID-19 shot by Independence Day.

A new CDC study found that the risk of fully vaccinated participants for COVID-19 infection was reduced by 91% and the risk of partially vaccinated participants was reduced by 81%

A new CDC study found that the risk of fully vaccinated participants for COVID-19 infection was reduced by 91% and the risk of partially vaccinated participants was reduced by 81%

People who received both doses of the shot were also less likely to develop symptoms or test positive for more than a week.  Pictured: A nurse gives Malikai McPherson (16) an injection of the Pfizer vaccine in Melbourne, Florida, May 17

People who received both doses of the shot were also less likely to develop symptoms or test positive for more than a week. Pictured: A nurse gives Malikai McPherson (16) an injection of the Pfizer vaccine in Melbourne, Florida, May 17

“COVID-19 vaccines are a critical tool in overcoming this pandemic,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a statement.

“Findings from the extended time frame of this study add to the collection of evidence that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are effective and should prevent most infections – but that fully vaccinated people who still get COVID-19 are likely to have a milder, shorter have illness and appear to be less likely to spread the virus to others.

“These benefits are another important reason to get vaccinated.”

For the study, published on pre-print site medRxiv.org, the team looked at 3,975 participants who were tested weekly for the coronavirus between December 13, 2020 and April 10, 2021.

During the 17-week study period, 204 volunteers, or 5.1 percent, tested positive for COVID-19.

Of that group, only five people had been fully vaccinated, meaning 14 days or more had passed since their second dose.

An additional 11 were partially vaccinated, either more than 14 days after dose one or 13 days or less after dose two.

By far the largest percentage — 76.4 percent or 156 people — had not been vaccinated.

The team found that the risk of infection of fully vaccinated participants was reduced by 91 percent and the risk of partially vaccinated participants was reduced by 81 percent.

These estimates include the risk of both symptomatic and asymptomatic coronavirus infections.

Researchers also looked at symptoms to determine whether COVID-19 disease was milder in the vaccinated volunteers.

They found that participants who had received one or both doses of the immunization had an average of six days less sick — 10 compared with 16.

Fewer than 500,000 adults are now vaccinated every day, up from a peak of 3.4 million in April

Fewer than 500,000 adults are now vaccinated every day, up from a peak of 3.4 million in April

Falling vaccination rates threaten President Joe Biden's goal of providing 70% of adults with at least one vaccine dose by July 4.

Falling vaccination rates threaten President Joe Biden’s goal of providing 70% of adults with at least one vaccine dose by July 4.

Vaccinated adults were also 60 percent less likely to develop symptoms, such as a fever or cough, compared to unvaccinated people who contracted the virus.

The results also showed that vaccinated people who have contracted COVID-19 are less likely to spread it to others.

Adults who were partially or fully immunized were 66 percent less likely to test more than one positive after their first test and had 40 percent less detectable virus in their noses than unvaccinated adults.

According to data from the CDC and Bloomberg, fewer than 500,000 people are vaccinated every day, up from a peak of 3.4 million in April.

This threatens Biden’s goal of giving 70 percent of American adults their first shot by July 4.

To reach this threshold, approximately 16 million adults will need to receive their first injection in the next 28 days.

However, only 2.4 million adults who received their first injections last week, The Washington Post reported. Officials calculate that number would need to be 4.2 million a week to meet Biden’s July 4 target.

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