Home Australia From little-known Wild West model to Melbourne’s queen bee: how a daring red dress changed Rebecca Judd’s life

From little-known Wild West model to Melbourne’s queen bee: how a daring red dress changed Rebecca Judd’s life

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Rebecca Judd, 41, went from little-known Western Australian model to Melbourne's Queen B after shooting to fame in a daring red dress at the 2004 Brownlow Medal (pictured at the event).

It’s been two decades since Melbourne WAG queen Rebecca Judd made her debut on the 2004 Brownlow Medal red carpet.

And life has certainly changed for the wife of retired AFL star Chris Judd since that fateful night.

The 41-year-old glamazon, who was once an anonymous model from Western Australia, now has a varied and brilliant career as a television presenter, influencer, radio presenter, author and business owner.

So how did a red dress launch the woman once known as Rebecca Twigley into the stratosphere?

This week, the popular Frank PodcastHosted by sisters Amy, Sophie and Kate Taeuber, it delved into Rebecca’s rise to fame and how she became known as Australia’s leading football WAG.

Rebecca Judd, 41, went from little-known Western Australian model to Melbourne’s Queen B after shooting to fame in a daring red dress at the 2004 Brownlow Medal (pictured at the event).

Rebecca burst onto the scene aged 21 when she wore a red dress with a plunging neckline to the 2004 Brownlow Medal alongside her then-boyfriend Chris.

The ensemble, which featured a neckline that fell below the navel and a daring thigh slit, was created by Perth designer Ruth Tarvydas and was valued at $2,000.

“Chris and Bec had been dating for just 10 months and were living in Perth at the time, and while Chris was well known in Perth football circles, Bec was a bit more high profile. But she wasn’t known nationally at all. ‘ said a sister.

Rebecca burst onto the scene aged 21 when she wore a red dress with a plunging neckline to the 2004 Brownlow Medal alongside her then-boyfriend, AFL star Chris (right).

Rebecca burst onto the scene aged 21 when she wore a red dress with a plunging neckline to the 2004 Brownlow Medal alongside her then-boyfriend, AFL star Chris (right).

“Chris had an outstanding season that year for the Eagles, so he was one of the favorites to take the Brownlow Medal.”

“Yes, and all eyes were supposed to be on Chris at that moment, but it was Bec who caught everyone’s attention,” another sister added.

While skin-baring dresses are a dime a dozen on the red carpet these days, Bec’s fashion decision turned heads at the time.

This week, the popular podcast Outspoken, hosted by sisters Amy, Sophie and Kate Taeuber (all pictured) delved into Rebecca's rise to fame and how she became known as Australia's top football WAG.

This week, the popular Outspoken podcast, hosted by sisters Amy, Sophie and Kate Taeuber (all pictured) delved into Rebecca’s rise to fame and how she became known as Australia’s top football WAG.

The Taeubers noted how Bec instantly stole the show, with one of them explaining: ‘This was 19 years ago. None of us had ever seen a dress like that on the red carpet. “It was very risky for the time.”

“Well, she clearly knew what she was doing,” said another, adding: “She was smart enough to know that this was a branding opportunity and that all eyes were on her, because her partner was touted to take home the Brownlow that year.

While Bec has since credited the red dress for launching her career, its display of exposed flesh caused plenty of backlash at the time.

The Taeubers noted how Bec instantly stole the show, with one of them explaining: 'This was 19 years ago. None of us had ever seen a dress like that on the red carpet. It was very risky for the time.

The Taeubers noted how Bec instantly stole the show, with one of them explaining: ‘This was 19 years ago. None of us had ever seen a dress like that on the red carpet. It was very risky for the time.’

“There were all these kinds of snide comments made about (Bec),” one sister said of the live media coverage at the 2004 Brownlows.

“It was like those kind of pig comments, and they kept backing away like the camera was on her the whole time. And they kind of degraded her,” she added.

Another sister noted that at one point, Bec grabbed her menu during the ceremony so she could block her cleavage from the ever-nosing cameras.

After the 2004 Brownlow Medal, Bec was inundated with offers from Australian television networks offering her roles.

After the 2004 Brownlow Medal, Bec was inundated with offers from Australian television networks offering her roles.

Elsewhere, the Taeubers addressed how Bec’s daring display impacted the type of red carpet attire that will be worn at football awards shows in the future.

The sisters noted that other WAGs have tried to replicate the impact caused by Bec’s appearance in the hope that they too can launch a career in the spotlight.

Speaking to the Herald Sun at the time, Rebecca said of her famous look: “I didn’t really think it would attract so much attention, but I got mobbed on the red carpet.”

After the 2004 Brownlow Medal, Bec was inundated with offers from Australian television networks offering her roles. She is pictured presenting the weather on Nine News Melbourne in 2014.

After the 2004 Brownlow Medal, Bec was inundated with offers from Australian television networks offering her roles. She is pictured presenting the weather on Nine News Melbourne in 2014.

“Everyone wanted an interview and photographs.”

Chris later told The Herald Sun that Brownlow 2004 was the night Bec became “public property” and their lives changed forever.

“It felt like a before and after. From there some wonderful opportunities opened up. Life was very different,’ said Chris, who was just 21 when he won the prestigious Brownlow Medal.

Capitalizing on her growing stardom, Bec also launched her Jaggad sportswear line in 2013 with the help of her husband, AFL star Steven Greene and his wife Michelle (left).

Capitalizing on her growing stardom, Bec also launched her Jaggad sportswear line in 2013 with the help of her husband, AFL star Steven Greene and his wife Michelle (left).

“The things around privacy, having a partner who was apparently also public property, there were a lot of things to get used to and my memories are of a really special night, but there’s also an exclamation point between life before and life after.” “. .’

After the 2004 Brownlow Medal, Bec was inundated with offers from Australian television networks offering her roles.

She continued to work as a guest presenter on Nine Perth’s Just Add Water program, as well as presenting a Melbourne Cup fashion news segment for Seven News in 2006.

A year later, Bec began working as a weekend weather presenter for Seven News in Perth.

She then joined the Nine Network, presenting travel show Postcards between 2011 and 2020, and presenting weather on Nine News Melbourne in 2014.

Capitalizing on her growing stardom, Bec also launched her sportswear line Jaggad in 2013 with the help of her husband, AFL star Steven Greene and his wife Michelle.

In 2017, she enjoyed a stint presenting KIIS FM’s 3pm Pick-Up show alongside Monty Dimond and Yumi Styles, before releasing her debut book ‘The Baby Bible’ a year later.

Bec is also an ambassador for a variety of beauty, fashion and lifestyle brands including Myer, Klorane and Adairs.

The Judds married in 2010 and he retired from football five years later.

The couple, who live in a $7.3 million mansion in Melbourne’s luxurious Brighton, share four children: daughter Billie, nine, son Oscar, 12, and twins Darcy and Tom, seven.

The Judds, who live in a $7.3 million mansion in Melbourne's luxurious Brighton, share four children: daughter Billie, nine, son Oscar, 12, and twins Darcy and Tom, seven (all pictured).

The Judds, who live in a $7.3 million mansion in Melbourne’s luxurious Brighton, share four children: daughter Billie, nine, son Oscar, 12, and twins Darcy and Tom, seven (all pictured).

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