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Frightening graph reveals the full impact of Australia’s cost-of-living crisis on grocery spend 

The reasons why your weekly grocery has become so much more expensive has been revealed as the cost of living crisis continues to hit shoppers at the checkout.

The weekly commodities that have risen the most in price over the past year have been named in the data behind this week’s announcement that inflation has hit its highest level in two decades.

Vegetables, fruits, cereals, bread, eggs, oils, butter and margarines have all risen sharply in price over the past year, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Grin and Endure: The reasons your weekly grocery has become so much more expensive have been revealed as the cost of living crisis continues to mistreat shoppers at the checkout

Grin and Endure: The reasons your weekly grocery has become so much more expensive have been revealed as the cost of living crisis continues to mistreat shoppers at the checkout

A confrontational chart illustrates the alarming rise in the cost of basic groceries, with vegetables, cereals and other household items topping the list of sharp price increases

A confrontational chart illustrates the alarming rise in the cost of basic groceries, with vegetables, cereals and other household items topping the list of sharp price increases

The ABS released its quarterly figures of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) – the main measure of inflation – on Wednesday morning, showing a jump of 6.1 percent over the past year.

That was the strongest rise in inflation since mid-2001 and excluding the effects of the GST, the highest since the December quarter of 1990.

The biggest jump in an everyday grocery item was the cost of vegetables, due to ongoing flooding in southeastern Queensland and New South Wales.

The biggest jump in an everyday grocery item was the cost of vegetables, due to ongoing flooding in southeastern Queensland and New South Wales

The biggest jump in an everyday grocery item was the cost of vegetables, due to ongoing flooding in southeastern Queensland and New South Wales

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, fruits, vegetables, cereals, bread and eggs have risen sharply in price over the past year.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, fruits, vegetables, cereals, bread and eggs have risen sharply in price over the past year.

In Australia, vegetables rose 7.3 percent in the past three months, but in some capitals the increases were even higher.

In Darwin, the cost of vegetables rose by 9 percent, while both Sydney and Melbourne saw vegetable prices rise by 7.7 percent.

In the 12 months to June 2022, fruits and vegetables grew by 7.3 percent.

Non-alcoholic drinks – think coffee, tea, juice and soft drinks have increased even more – 7.9 percent.

Butters, margarines and oils are another item that has also risen sharply in price, according to ABS

Butters, margarines and oils are another item that has also risen sharply in price, according to ABS

The cost of everyday items such as fruits and vegetables, bread, milk, meat, non-alcoholic drinks and even cleaning products rose over the past year as inflation in Australia soared to its highest point in two decades.

The cost of everyday items such as fruits and vegetables, bread, milk, meat, non-alcoholic drinks and even cleaning products rose over the past year as inflation in Australia soared to its highest point in two decades.

There was no reprieve if you chose to eat out to try and save on your grocery bill over the past year. The cost of meals and takeaway in restaurants and cafes also increased by 4.7 percent.

Another large part of the weekly shop, bathroom items and cleaning products also jumped sharply.

ABS aid ‘Non-sustainable household products’ (including toilet rolls, hair, dental care, razors, all cleaning products) rose 10.7 percent over the past year.

The cost of non-alcoholic beverages, including coffee and tea, has risen 7.9 percent in the past year, the ABS said.

The cost of non-alcoholic beverages, including coffee and tea, has risen 7.9 percent in the past year, the ABS said.

Breads, cereals and other foods, such as spreads and sauces, have risen in price by more than 6 percent in the past 12 months

Breads, cereals and other foods, such as spreads and sauces, have risen in price by more than 6 percent in the past 12 months

Government figures said the cost of transportation (up 13.1 percent) and housing (up 9 percent) — including both rent and mortgage payments — made the biggest jumps in the past year.

The largest increases in the past three months were: purchase of new homes by owner-occupiers (+5.6 percent), fuel (+4.2 percent) and furniture (up 7 percent).

Consumer prices rose in all eight capital cities, with people in Perth and Brisbane experiencing the largest annual increases of 7.4 percent and 7.3 percent respectively.

Across Australia, the cost of meat and seafood increased by 6.3 percent in the past year

Across Australia, the cost of meat and seafood increased by 6.3 percent in the past year

Housing costs, including new homes, rent, electricity, gas and water, rose by 9 percent in the past year

Housing costs, including new homes, rent, electricity, gas and water, rose by 9 percent in the past year

Darwin (+6.6 percent), Hobart (+6.5 percent) and Adelaide (+6.4 percent) saw the next largest increases.

In Sydney, prices rose 5.3 percent and for Melbourne the jump was 6.1 percent, while in Canberra the jump was 6.3 percent.

Across Australia, transport costs – including fuel and public transport fares – rose 13.1 percent in the June quarter compared to the same time last year.

Housing costs rose by nine percent, undoubtedly driven by the sharp rise in electricity costs.

Large increases in the cost of new Australian homes over the past year have been a major factor in the rise in housing costs.

New home prices posted their biggest annual increase since the series began in the June 1999 quarter, the ABS said.

“Price increases are still driven by high construction activity coupled with ongoing shortages of materials and labor.”

The ABS also noted that rents in Sydney and Melbourne rose for the second consecutive quarter.

The cost of 'non-durable household products', a group that includes cleaning products, rose 10.7 percent in the past year

The cost of ‘non-durable household products’, a group that includes cleaning products, rose 10.7 percent in the past year

Treasurer Jim Chalmers said: 'These are confronting numbers' with mortgage rates continuing to rise

Treasurer Jim Chalmers said: ‘These are confronting numbers’ with mortgage rates continuing to rise

June quarter CPI data raised fears of a super-large 75 basis point rate hike in August.

Previously, treasurer Jim Chalmers said “these are confronting numbers” with mortgage rates set to continue rising.

“It’s going to be a tough time,” he warned.

Headline inflation is now well above the Reserve Bank of Australia’s target of two to three percent, with the latest reading showing a sharp rise from the pace of 5.1 percent in March, when gasoline prices rose above $2 a year. liters climbed.

The consumer price index rose in the June quarter at its strongest pace since mid-2001, after unemployment fell to a 48-year low of 3.5 percent last month.  But when the one-off effect of the introduction of GST was ruled out, Australia's CPI was the highest since the December quarter of 1990

The consumer price index rose in the June quarter at its strongest pace since mid-2001, after unemployment fell to a 48-year low of 3.5 percent last month. But when the one-off effect of the introduction of GST was ruled out, Australia’s CPI was the highest since the December quarter of 1990

What has increased the most in Australia in the past year?

Transport +13.1%

  • (Includes fuel, car repairs, train/bus/ferry costs)

Non-durable household products +10.7%

  • (Including toilet roll, hair, dental care, razors, all cleaning products)

Housing +9%

  • (Including: new construction, rent, electricity, gas, water)

Non-alcoholic drinks +7.9%

  • (Includes coffee, tea, soft drinks, juice)

Fruits and vegetables +7.3%

Bread, cereals +6.3%

  • (Includes bread, cereal, biscuits, rice, oats, flour)

Meat and seafood +6.3%

Furnishings, household appliances and services +6.3%

  • (Includes haircuts, childcare, appliances, tools, furniture, floors, linens)

Other food products +6.1%

(Included: eggs, herbs, spices, sauces)

Milk, cheese, ice cream +5.2%

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

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