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A beluga whale was caught on camera and tried to make a new friend in a seagull floating along the water

A whale of a time! Friendly beluga and seagull are seen together & # 39; together & # 39; spotted in the Norwegian harbor

  • Jan-Olaf Johansen, 49, recorded the images in the port of Hammerfest, Norway
  • Whale follows the bird around the water and keeps pushing it for attention
  • The beluga, known as Hvaldimir, became famous earlier this year when it was used as a spy by the Russian navy in Norwegian waters
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A friendly beluga whale was caught on camera and tried to become friends with a seagull floating around the water.

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Jan-Olaf Johansen, 49, recorded the images while working on a ship in the port of Hammerfest, Norway.

In the video he sees the white whale swimming through the water in front of him.

He glides gracefully to the surface of a large seagull carrying a fish in its mouth.

The bird paddles over the water while the whale hurls up and gently nibbles as if trying to attract its attention.

The seagull flaps its wings and squeaks a bit before dropping the fish it had worn, but it stays on the surface.

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The whale lurks beneath the glassy water and follows the path of the gull before he turns up to give him another push.

A beluga whale was caught on camera and tried to make a new friend in a seagull floating along the water

A beluga whale was caught on camera and tried to make a new friend in a seagull floating along the water

Jan-Olaf Johansen, 49, recorded the images while working on a ship in the port of Hammerfest, Norway, while the seagull paddled over the surface and held a fish in his mouth

Jan-Olaf Johansen, 49, recorded the images while working on a ship in the port of Hammerfest, Norway, while the seagull paddled over the surface and held a fish in his mouth

Jan-Olaf Johansen, 49, recorded the images while working on a ship in the port of Hammerfest, Norway, while the seagull paddled over the surface and held a fish in his mouth

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The whale claps its back for a moment and begins to chase another seagull that has landed on the water, but proves to be less patient than its counterpart and flies away almost immediately.

The beluga decides to return to its original knowledge and raises its head in front of the shocked seagull before attempting to catch his new friend in his open mouth.

He continues to playfully pursue his new friend for a few minutes while wobbling with his fins and tail in the water.

Jan-Olaf and his shipmates watch and giggle every time the whale tries to nibble again.

But the seagull does not seem at all put off by the whole event.

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It continues to paddle over the rippling water to get the fish he had dropped until the whale itself grabs the food he was snacking on.

The bird begins to nibble at one end of the fish, while the beluga retains its tight grip at the other end, where the video ends.

The bird paddles over the water while the beluga whale swings out of the water and nibbles gently as if trying to attract its attention

The bird paddles over the water while the beluga whale swings out of the water and nibbles gently as if trying to attract its attention

The bird paddles over the water while the beluga whale swings out of the water and nibbles gently as if trying to attract its attention

The seagull flaps its wings and squeaks a bit before dropping the fish it had worn, but it stays on the surface

The seagull flaps its wings and squeaks a bit before dropping the fish it had worn, but it stays on the surface

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The seagull flaps its wings and squeaks a bit before dropping the fish it had worn, but it stays on the surface

The whale is actually very famous in the area.

The beluga, known as Hvaldimir became famous earlier this year when he was used as a spy by the Russian navy in Norwegian waters.

Jan-Olaf said: & The whale Hvaldimir got a fish and the seagull tried to catch it.

& # 39; Then the two started playing.

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& # 39; The whale was more interested in playing with the bird than in retrieving the fish.

& # 39; I found it very funny to look at the play between the two animals.

& # 39; Many people have come to Hammerfest to see the whale, but there is no guarantee how long Hvaldimir will stay in that area.

& # 39; After they finished playing, the seagull flew away completely unharmed. & # 39;

A brief history of the use of aquatic animals as soldiers

At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union established a dolphin unit in Crimea in 1973 to carry out missions.

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Soviet handlers have been training a number of marine mammals for decades from a specialized training center in the Black Sea port of Sevastopol.

The military marine mammals of the program were able to plant bombs on ships, find underwater mines and even attack divers with knives and guns on their heads, according to some reports.

At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union established a dolphin unit in Crimea in 1973 to carry out missions. Depicted is a Soviet diver with one of the dolphins during training

At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union established a dolphin unit in Crimea in 1973 to carry out missions. Depicted is a Soviet diver with one of the dolphins during training

At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union established a dolphin unit in Crimea in 1973 to carry out missions. Depicted is a Soviet diver with one of the dolphins during training

After the fall of the USSR, the dolphin unit was handed over to the Ukrainian army in the early 90s.

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The program continued until 2014 when Russia annexed the Crimea and captured the dolphins.

Some believed that Moscow intended to retrain the dolphins as Russian soldiers.

A source told the Russian agency RIA Novosti that engineers developed new aquarium technologies for new programs to use dolphins more efficiently under water.

On May 14, 2018, Borys Babin, the representative of the Ukrainian government in Crimea, revealed that the dolphins had died in Russia.

He claimed that the military mammals refused to follow orders or eat food provided by the Russians.

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