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France and Norway are at risk of CLOSING their borders with Spain due to rising cases of coronavirus

France and Norway have threatened to close their borders with Spain due to the rising incidence of coronavirus.

The Spanish tourism industry, which accounts for about 12 percent of the country’s economy, is in danger of collapsing if countries attempt to fight a second wave of Covid-19.

The bottom line is that the number of coronavirus cases in Spain has increased with another 2,615 new infections registered by Madrid yesterday.

People who sat on beach towels in Cala de Alfacar, Menorca earlier this week, fearing a second wave of coronavirus cases in Spain

People who sat on beach towels in Cala de Alfacar, Menorca earlier this week, fearing a second wave of coronavirus cases in Spain

The bottom line is that the number of coronavirus cases in Spain has risen with another 2,615 new infections registered by Madrid yesterday

The bottom line is that the number of coronavirus cases in Spain has risen with another 2,615 new infections registered by Madrid yesterday

The bottom line is that the number of coronavirus cases in Spain has risen with another 2,615 new infections registered by Madrid yesterday

France has said it would not rule out closing its border with Spain’s Catalan region as it is experiencing a “significant increase” in infections, according to the French Public Health Authority.

Catalonia, which borders France, has been at the heart of a revival in cases of coronavirus since Spain lifted a nationwide fence a month ago.

There, nearly 7,000 cases were registered in the past 14 days, accounting for nearly half of the nationwide total, although the rate has fallen in recent days.

Norway has also warned that it could add Spain to its list of high-risk countries, which would force all arrivals to a 10-day quarantine.

People with facial masks are walking along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week as Spain takes another hit in the tourist industry due to the corona virus

People with facial masks are walking along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week as Spain takes another hit in the tourist industry due to the corona virus

People with facial masks are walking along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week as Spain takes another hit in the tourist industry due to the corona virus

This would prove to be another blow to the Spanish economy after two-thirds of tourists canceled their hotel bookings this month.

Cancellation rates go up to 77 percent among families and 70 percent in the Balearic Islands, including Mallorca.

In some hotels, the number of tourists canceling holidays they booked a few weeks or months ago is higher than the number of new bookings.

Elizabeth Keegan, tourism director in Lloret de Mar, said: “We are getting cancellations from Britain, France and Belgium.

“The 120 hotels here are about 65 percent full, and they’re normally 100 percent full at this time of year.”

Spain registered more than 9,000 new cases in the past seven days, after seeing only 5,000 in the past week.

Earlier this week, a city in Murcia again imposed severe restrictions, including a ban on entering or leaving the area after a peak in entertainment-related cases.

The Balearic government maintains that the archipelago is “safe for residents and visitors,” but some tourists have been alarmed by the growing number of cases.

People sunbathing this week on the La Misericordia beach in Malaga, fearing the Spanish tourism industry will collapse

People sunbathing this week on the La Misericordia beach in Malaga, fearing the Spanish tourism industry will collapse

People sunbathing this week on the La Misericordia beach in Malaga, fearing the Spanish tourism industry will collapse

According to research by tourism group Dingus, visitors who booked their trips between two and four months ago canceled more than 80 percent of their vacation.

The UK government has not made any changes to its rules regarding Spain, after the deletion of the 14-day quarantine regulations for people returning from Spain to England after 10 July.

But it comes after British tourists were warned that a new travel system means airlifts could collapse in the short term, quarantining them on their return to the UK.

Earlier this month, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Commonwealth exempted a number of countries from the “anything but essential” travel guidance.

It means that holidaymakers can currently travel to 74 locations without having to remain in quarantine for 14 days on their return to the UK.

But Britain is currently reviewing all countries on the ‘safe list’ every three weeks. But the government is expected to reveal a new rolling review list, meaning places could be “ red-listed ” very soon, as reported by The Telegraph.

Women with facial masks walk along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week, amid the corona virus crisis

Women with facial masks walk along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week, amid the corona virus crisis

Women with facial masks walk along the beach of La Misericordia, Malaga earlier this week, amid the corona virus crisis

This means that for your vacation abroad you can go to a country that is on the ‘safe’ list, but while a peak in coronavirus cases disappears, the government can put it on the ‘red’ list, which means that you have 14 weeks quarantine. days after your return.

It is debatable that ‘regional’ airlifts can be set up to enable people to travel to specific areas of countries where the number of coronavirus infections is lower.

The ‘regional’ airlift plan could identify low-risk areas in high-risk countries that travelers could visit without subsequently being subject to 14-day quarantine regulations upon return.

Such a move would end an absolute travel ban for entire countries and further relax quarantine regulations.

The airlift plan is thought to be viewed as part of a revision of current travel restrictions, with changes to be announced Monday by Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps.

The introduction of ‘regional’ airlifts could open up travel to tourist hotspots like the Algarve and Madeira in Portugal, while keeping a ban on going to areas like Lisbon where the corona virus is more common.

It would also allow the return of some trips to the US, fearing that the national magnitude of the outbreak could lead to a long-term ban.

A source told The Telegraph, “Regional airlifts are an option for countries with local outbreaks.

“The US is a major problem. If you rate it nationwide, the absence of travel can last for months, and then individual testing of arrivals may work. ‘

Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, told The Times, “The construction of air corridors between low-contamination financial centers, such as between London and New York, would be an essential driver of business travel and economic recovery.”

Meanwhile, it is also believed that ministers intend to introduce the coronavirus tests before or upon arrival at UK airports in a further measure that could reopen the trip to the US.

Mr Shapps will set out on Monday any changes to the current travel rules and announce whether any countries will be added to the 74 that are already exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement.

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