Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Founder of the healthy snack empire Koja that sells 100,000 a month, reveals her typical daily diet

The founder of the healthy snack empire KOJA has provided insight into her typical daily diet, as well as the daily exercise regimen that keeps her fit as she runs her growing business.

Kate Johansson, from Sydney, has stored her healthy peanut butter bars in more than 800 supermarkets across Australia and currently sells 100,000 bars every month.

Kate 33 said she launched the natural food brand in 2014 after she was disappointed with the number of over-processed snacks on the shelves.

Since its launch, KOJA has made $ 100,000 in sales in Coles in the first month and is expected to make millions this year.

The young woman and founder of the healthy snack empire KOJA has provided insight into her typical daily diet, as well as the daily exercise regimen that keeps her fit (Kate Johansson in the photo)

The young woman and founder of the healthy snack empire KOJA has provided insight into her typical daily diet, as well as the daily exercise regimen that keeps her fit (Kate Johansson in the photo)

Kate Johansson, from Sydney, has stored her healthy peanut butter bars in over 800 supermarkets across Australia and currently sells 100,000 bars every month (shown in Coles)

Kate Johansson, from Sydney, has stored her healthy peanut butter bars in over 800 supermarkets across Australia and currently sells 100,000 bars every month (shown in Coles)

Kate Johansson, from Sydney, has stored her healthy peanut butter bars in over 800 supermarkets across Australia and currently sells 100,000 bars every month (shown in Coles)

What is a typical day on Kate’s plate?

* BREAKFAST: Smoothie with lots of vegetables (spinach, cucumber, kale, kiwi), banana, fresh mint leaves, oat milk and ice cream.

* LUNCH: Vegetable soup with a piece of sourdough bread.

* SNACKS: Koi bars, fresh fruit, rice crackers and peanut butter.

* SUPPER: Vegetarian curries, stews and stews.

* DESSERT: Chocolate.

When it comes to her daily diet, Kate told FEMAIL that she swears by a lot of leafy vegetables, mostly vegetarian food and a little bit of what she likes.

“What I eat really depends on the day of the week and what season it is,” she told Daily Mail Australia.

“Some days I eat chocolate and pancakes, while others are all green smoothies, vegetable soups and vegan curries for dinner.”

While Kate said she doesn’t plan her meals, she always makes sure she has ‘healthy snacks’ at work to avoid unhealthy takeaways.

“KOJA is my obvious secret there, but I’ll always have fresh fruit on hand, as well as rice crackers and peanut butter, and a few soups in the fridge,” she said.

“Even by storing a sourdough bread in the freezer and eating some avocado, you can put together a simple work lunch without much fuss.”

A typical day on the entrepreneur’s 33-year-old plate includes a smoothie for breakfast, soup and sourdough for lunch and curries, stews and stews for dinner.

Kate said she loves to eat vegetarian food, but doesn’t deny herself a bit of what she loves: namely chocolate and weekend coffee and croissants.

Kate 33 said she launched the natural food brand in 2014 after being disappointed with the number of over-processed snacks on the shelves (the KOJA bars pictured)

Kate 33 said she launched the natural food brand in 2014 after being disappointed with the number of over-processed snacks on the shelves (the KOJA bars pictured)

Kate 33 said she launched the natural food brand in 2014 after being disappointed with the number of over-processed snacks on the shelves (the KOJA bars pictured)

Kate (photo) also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging

Kate (photo) also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging

Kate (photo) also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging

Kate (photo) also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging

Kate (photo) also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging

Kate also said that she is an avid athlete and strives for 10,000 steps a day with no mistakes, as well as a weekly yoga class, two or three gym workouts, and jogging.

“I like sports as a way to relax, clear my head and go outside,” said the 33-year-old.

“I never force myself to exercise, but I find that I look forward to them and feel better afterwards.

“At the moment, I do most of my workouts on Zoom, but I make sure I go out for a walk almost every day.”

What makes the KOJA bars healthy?

* Kate said that when developing their natural peanut butter bars, she and her team tested over 20 natural snack bars and found that the average sugar content was 16 grams per bar.

The KOJA bars (photo) contain 75 percent less sugar than your average snack bar

The KOJA bars (photo) contain 75 percent less sugar than your average snack bar

The KOJA bars (photo) contain 75 percent less sugar than your average snack bar

* She said she found this shocking, as the World Health Organization has a recommended daily dose of 24 grams per day for good health.

* Kate said she wanted to find a range of ‘no added sugar’ bars and that the products contain 75 percent less sugar than other natural snack bars, ranging from 4.7 grams to 4.2 grams per 30-gram bar.

* Different flavors are available, each for $ 3.50. These include Choc Chip Crunch, Peanut Caramel, and Chocolate.

* Kate cautions that you should be careful with products labeled as “no added sugar” or “natural,” as this doesn’t always mean they are healthy. While natural sweeteners like dates, honey and malt syrup are healthier for you, they are still a form of sugar and should be consumed in moderation.

* She recommends looking at the ingredients list before buying, because what they have the most they often mention first. If a product contains numbers, it is also recommended to avoid it.

Kate (photo) came up with the idea for KOJA a few years ago, when she stuck to her regular 'day job' and started the snack bar business with two jobs

Kate (photo) came up with the idea for KOJA a few years ago, when she stuck to her regular 'day job' and started the snack bar business with two jobs

Kate (photo) came up with the idea for KOJA a few years ago, when she stuck to her regular ‘day job’ and started the snack bar business with two jobs

Kate came up with the idea for KOJA a few years ago, when she held on to her regular ‘day job’ and opened the snack bar business with two jobs.

The young entrepreneur took a leap a year later when she quit her job and appeared on Network 10’s Shark Tank.

She turned down Sharks’ offer of an investment of $ 150,000 in exchange for 40 percent equity, but it didn’t matter.

KOJA’s products sold out within 15 minutes of the episode airing, earning $ 150,000 in sales overnight.

“By the time the episode aired, I had stocked every dollar I owned and bought as much as possible, so it was great to see the response,” Kate said earlier.

She later made a deal with Coles, and by January, the bars were readily available at any supermarket across the country.

KOJA made $ 100,000 in sales in its first month at Coles, and based on current success, the partnership is expected to generate millions.

KOJA bars cost $ 3.50 per bar. Click for more information about the bars here.

What is the KOJA health philosophy?

The KOJA (bars pictured) health philosophy is that you should eat real food and cut the processed snacks

The KOJA (bars pictured) health philosophy is that you should eat real food and cut the processed snacks

The KOJA (bars pictured) health philosophy is that you should eat real food and cut the processed snacks

1. Eat real food

Lots of whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, lean meats, fish, eggs, dairy products, whole grains. If you can, buy from local shops, farmers markets, or at least know what’s in the foods you eat.

2. Cut the processed food products

Too much salt, too much sugar and poor quality ingredients are used to make these products. Think fast food chains and packaged products with long lists of ingredients and preservatives. It is not good for you.

3. Enjoy food

Know where it comes from and how it was cooked or prepared before you decide to eat it. Share cooking and eating with your friends and family. In fact, grow your own vegetables or visit a farm to better understand your food.

4. Relax

Find time to relax and do the things you enjoy. Manage your stress levels and look for the positives every day. Your emotional state will affect the way your body digests food, and digestion may be the most important aspect of your health.

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