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A reconstruction shows how the shell of the turtle can be flattened under the giant foot of the sauropod - the long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs were among the largest land animals ever

Fossil from a flattened sea turtle is found in the Swiss mountains after the fateful creature entered the path of a huge dinosaur 150 million years ago

  • Paleontologists on an excavation in the Jura Mountains found the remains of the turtle
  • They believe it was crushed while it was on a mud flat, possibly on the way to the sea
  • Although about 100 other turtles were found, this was the only one in the flats
  • It is thought that it was crushed by a sauropod, a sort of giant herbivore
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Scientists have found the fossil of a sea turtle that seems to have undergone the grim fate on which a huge dinosaur kicks him.

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The stone remains of the creature were found in the Jura Mountains along the Franco-Swiss border.

The creature, which collapsed 150 million years ago, is believed to have been crushed by a sauropod – a long-necked herbivore such as a diplodocus.

Paleontologists disagree about how the turtle got there, but discovered that the flattened bowl was pressed into the ground before it became a fossil.

A reconstruction shows how the shell of the turtle can be flattened under the giant foot of the sauropod - the long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs were among the largest land animals ever

A reconstruction shows how the scale of the turtle may have been flattened under the giant foot of the sauropod – the long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs were among the largest land animals ever

Paleontologists found about 100 fossilized turtles in their excavation in the Jura Mountains between Switzerland and France, but said this was the only one found in such circumstances
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Paleontologists found about 100 fossilized turtles in their excavation in the Jura Mountains between Switzerland and France, but said this was the only one found in such circumstances

Paleontologists found about 100 fossilized turtles in their excavation in the Jura Mountains between Switzerland and France, but said this was the only one found in such circumstances

& # 39; The proof (that the turtle has been kicked) is pretty clear, & # 39; Dr. told Daniel Marty, a paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in Basel, New York Times.

& # 39; It's kind of funny and it also shows that these two animals were in the same paleo environment. It is a real-time intersection. & # 39;

It is thought that the fateful encounter took place during the Jura, which was named after the Jura where it took place.

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Scientists suggest that prehistoric creatures might have met while turtles crossed tidal flats, also called mud flats, to come to beaches to lay their eggs.

Another theory was that the turtle stranded or dried up in the mud and died on the way to the sea, and then stood on the beast.

Although the Jura Mountains are no longer everywhere near the sea, the position of the continents was very different during the Jura, before Europe merged in its current form.

In their study, published in the Swiss Journal of Geosciences, the team suggested that a sauropod dinosaur was probably on the turtle, which was dug up in 2007.

Sauropods were long, elephant-like four-legged herbivores with long legs and necks and were among the largest land animals that have ever existed.

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Among them were the diplodocus, brontosaurus and brachiosaurus.

In total, Dr. Marty & # 39; s team during their excavation found around 100 fossilized sea turtles among more than 15,000 dinosaur footprints.

However, this specimen was the only one found in such bizarre circumstances, The Times reported.

The scientists called it a & # 39; wonderfully unique & # 39; situation.

Jordan Mallon, paleontologists from the Canadian Museum of Nature, who was not involved in the study, said the theory said it was & # 39; plausible & # 39; used to be.

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& # 39; It is important to document fossils such as these where you can try to make two species live together, & # 39; he told the NYT.

& # 39; Only by doing that can we reconstruct old ecosystems. & # 39;

WHAT ARE SAUROPODS?

Sauropods were the first successful group of herbivorous dinosaurs that dominated most terrestrial ecosystems for over 140 million years, from the Late Triassic to the Cretaceous.

They had long necks and tails and relatively small skulls and brains.

They extended to 130 feet (40 meters) and weighed up to 80 tons (80,000 kg) – 14 times the weight of an African elephant.

Sauropods were the first successful group of herbivorous dinosaurs, which dominated most terrestrial ecosystems for over 140 million years, from the Late Triassic to the Cretaceous
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Sauropods were the first successful group of herbivorous dinosaurs, which dominated most terrestrial ecosystems for over 140 million years, from the Late Triassic to the Cretaceous

Sauropods were the first successful group of herbivorous dinosaurs, which dominated most terrestrial ecosystems for over 140 million years, from the Late Triassic to the Cretaceous

They were widespread – their remains were found on all continents except Antarctica.

They had nostrils high on their skulls – instead of being at the end of the muzzle like that of so many other terrestrial vertebrates.

Some fossils show that these nostril openings were so far in the skull that there were very close to the eye openings.

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Sauro pods such as the Diplodocus began to diversify around 180 million years ago in the Middle Jura.

Source: University of California Museum of Paleontology

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