Former Tesco boss Sir Dave Lewis to run submarine power cables

Former Tesco boss Sir Dave Lewis heads a company that plans to lay thousands of miles of submarine cable to supply the UK with renewable energy from Africa


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Former Tesco boss Sir Dave Lewis is the new chairman of a company that plans to lay thousands of miles of submarine cable to supply the UK with renewable energy from Africa.

The project aims to provide seven million homes in the UK with ‘near constant, cheap clean energy’ via the 3,800 km submarine cable.

Lewis said the bold plan will tie in with newly built solar and wind generators in Morocco and help Britain achieve its ambitions of ‘a reliable, net-zero electricity system by 2035’.

New challenge: Sir Dave Lewis Lewis is credited with turning Tesco over after he arrived in 2014 and found a £263m black hole in his accounts

New challenge: Sir Dave Lewis Lewis is credited with turning Tesco over after he arrived in 2014 and found a £263m black hole in his accounts

Lewis is credited with turning Tesco over after he arrived in 2014 and found a £263m black hole in his accounts. Since he left last year, there has been constant speculation about his next major role.

His new office, Xlinks, was founded in 2018 by entrepreneur and vice president of the office, Simon Morrish. It will produce the high voltage direct current (HVDC) cable for the project in the UK, which will create approximately 1,350 jobs. Through a partnership with ACWA Power, it will generate 3.6 gigawatts of energy in Morocco at a distance of 1,500 km.

It says the reliability of the Moroccan sun and desert winds will help provide a smoother supply for the UK, where the flow of wind and solar can be highly variable.

Lewis said: ‘We are entering an era of unprecedented growth in offshore wind farms around the world. Investing in a valuable, fast-growing British government-owned export industry that serves decarbonising economies around the world will create thousands of regional manufacturing jobs and boost demand for British-made steel and aluminum for decades.”

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