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Former sniper Tim Kennedy tells Joe Rogan that ‘defund the police’ is to blame for Uvalde massacre

Former Green Beret sniper and MMA fighter Tim Kennedy believes the ‘defund the police’ movement bears some of the blame for the Robb Elementary School shooting.

Kennedy, 42, shared his insight into the deaths of 19 children and two teachers in Uvalde in May while performing at “The Joe Rogan Experience” on June 16.

Kennedy cited “defund the police,” a movement that grew out of nationwide protests after the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, as a role in the Uvalde shooting as officers are trained “with broken systems” and as a result ” not ready to do the right thing.”

The former MMA star predicted there will be more incidents like Uvalde.

Kennedy said, “We have weakened them and we have made them ill-equipped to respond to that. And then I think Uvalde is a good example of not being trained properly with broken systems not ready to do the right thing.

He continued: ‘We’ll have more of that unless we give them the right training and make our schools hard targets. And then we go upstream to the origin, the genesis of these issues, which is mental health with the individual.”

He added: “Only then can we go upstream to the origin, the genesis of these problems, which is sane for the individual.”

Former sniper Tim Kennedy told Joe Rogan he expects more incidents like Uvalde until officers get better training

Former sniper Tim Kennedy told Joe Rogan he expects more incidents like Uvalde until officers get better training

Kennedy told Rogan that we can't look at other things that cause mass shootings until we invest more in police officers

Kennedy told Rogan that we can’t look at other things that cause mass shootings until we invest more in police officers

Kennedy also said that as a result of the 'defund the Police' movement, 'almost every major city has seen a frenzied rise in crime'

Kennedy also said that as a result of the ‘defund the Police’ movement, ‘almost every major city has seen a frenzied rise in crime’

Kennedy said at one point in the conversation, “How does it make sense that I’m going to provide this group that I want to protect us with less training and less funding, but still want them to be a better product to be able to protect us?” to protect?’

The city of Uvalde invests 40% of its annual budget in the police, the department has a SWAT team and there is a police department for the Uvalde School District.

Uvalde, a city of 16,000 inhabitants, spends 4 million dollars on the police. It will be the largest expenditure in the city budget for 2022, reports Bloomberg.

The network says the school district police received more than $500,000 in local and state funding in 2020 for “security and surveillance” for schools.

In 2004, Kennedy joined the military and completed several Special Forces training programs. He told Fox news in June 2022 that he was motivated to enlist after the September 11 attacks. Kennedy said the attack “infuriated him.”

In 2018, Kennedy told DailyMail.com that the FBI was investigating threats against him by ISIS.

In addition to his military career, Kennedy has competed in mixed martial arts since 1996 and continued to fight even while serving in the military. Throughout his career, which ended in 2017, Kennedy fought professionally 24 times, winning 18 of them.

He is also the owner of Ranger Up, a military clothing company, and Sheepdog Rescue, a self-defense training company.

Kennedy lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife and four children. On his Instagram page, he calls himself “unashamedly American.”

Kennedy pictured with one of his children on Father's Day 2022

Kennedy pictured with one of his children on Father’s Day 2022

Throughout his MMA career, which ended in 2017, Kennedy has fought professionally 24 times and won 18

Throughout his MMA career, which ended in 2017, Kennedy has fought professionally 24 times and won 18

Kennedy started training in MMA in 1996

Kennedy started training in MMA in 1996

Kennedy was on Rogan’s show to promote his bestselling book Scars and Stripes. In part of his book, Kennedy discusses his plan to build an elementary school in Texas.

Earlier in the conversation, Kennedy accused “society” of “demonizing military training for law enforcement.”

Kennedy also said, “Then, of course, we’ve just experienced the police. And almost every major city has seen an insane rise in crime. And those big cities that haven’t paid their police to take Austin in, you know, we’ve never seen murders like this.”

According to a January 2022 Time magazine characteristic, 11 major cities had historically high homicide rates in 2021.

The article goes on to say that there was an 80% increase in gun fatalities between 2014 and 2021.

Kennedy also accused society’s culture of “unmanning” law enforcement.

He admitted: ‘You know, we want a kinder, gentler, gentler – I understand they’re dealing with mental health and we can have specialists who can come and deal with someone with a mental health crisis, but we still have men needed and women who run to the sound of gunshots and know what to do.”

Kennedy concluded the topic, “If we don’t do those things, we’re never going to get it right.”

The former Green Beret made similar comments in an appearance on The Clay Travis & Buck Sexton Show earlier in June.

Kennedy said if he was one of the parents who showed up while Uvalde’s agents delayed, “If I were my kids in there, I’d kick in the door. If there was a police officer in the way, I’d kick his teeth in it.’

He added that he felt “political correctness” was the fault of officers positioning themselves outside the scene of the shooting rather than intervening.

Kennedy continued, “We need to make our schools hard targets. We must return authority to our police officers. We’ve been emasculating them figuratively for ten years, where there is so much fear to take action.’

School surfacing for security against active shooters has long been a controversial topic.

In 2019, school safety expert Kenneth Trump told the National Education Associations website, “A skewed focus on goal hardening neglects the time and resources needed to spend on professional development training, planning, behavioral and mental health intervention support for students, and other best practices.” ‘

Jagdish Khubchandani, a public health professor at New Mexico State University, told The Texas Tribune in the wake of Uvalde, “This concept of hardening, the more it’s done, it hasn’t shown results.”

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