Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key says name tags are needed to remind Australia's prime ministers

Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key (left), who was a friend of Malcolm Turnbull (right), has mocked Australia for having a revolving door of national leaders

A former New Zealand prime minister who was Malcolm Turnbull's friend has mocked Australia for having a revolving door for national leaders.

John Key weighed in on his partner being replaced three weeks ago by Scott Morrison while visiting Australia for a property conference.

With Australia now in its fifth prime minister in five years, the former prime minister of New Zealand offered a strategy to remember who was the leader.

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Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key (left), who was a friend of Malcolm Turnbull (right), has mocked Australia for having a revolving door of national leaders

Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key (left), who was a friend of Malcolm Turnbull (right), has mocked Australia for having a revolving door of national leaders

Malcolm Turnbull (pictured with his wife Lucy on vacation in New York) was deposed three weeks ago, prompting John Key to joke with a nameplate to remind Australian MPs.

Malcolm Turnbull (pictured with his wife Lucy on vacation in New York) was deposed three weeks ago, prompting John Key to joke with a nameplate to remind Australian MPs.

Malcolm Turnbull (pictured with his wife Lucy on vacation in New York) was deposed three weeks ago, prompting John Key to joke with a nameplate to remind Australian MPs.

"I used to say:" Comrade, I really do not care who appears, just use a badge so you know who you are, "he said at the conference of the Property Congress in Darwin today attended by ABC.

Key left politics early last year, a few months after choosing his retirement date as prime minister of New Zealand, something that an Australian prime minister has not done since January 1966.

Mr. Key, who was from the center-right National Party, compared Australia to Italy when it came to punches.

"I was the 38th Prime Minister of New Zealand and John Howard was 24 years old, now you are up to 30 years old," he said, forgetting that Mr. Howard was the twenty-fifth MP of Australia.

Scott Morrison (pictured with his wife Jenny at Midwinter Ball in Canberra) became Australia's fifth prime minister in five years last month, during a period when New Zealand had three MPs

Scott Morrison (pictured with his wife Jenny at Midwinter Ball in Canberra) became Australia's fifth prime minister in five years last month, during a period when New Zealand had three MPs

Scott Morrison (pictured with his wife Jenny at Midwinter Ball in Canberra) became Australia's fifth prime minister in five years last month, during a period when New Zealand had three MPs

Kiwi's former PM, who won three elections, also recalled how Mr. Turnbull sent him a text message after he announced his retirement in December 2016 with the message "Say no, brother."

"I'm very fond of Malcolm, so you always feel when a political leader loses his job, that personal element, if you want," he said.

"But also, at the time he was prime minister, I thought he did a good job for Australia."

New Zealand has had three prime ministers for the past five years, compared with five in Australia, after Kevin Rudd stabbed his bitter Labor rival Julia Gillard in June 2013.

The Labor and Liberal parties overthrew the prime ministers of their own side in 2010, 2013, 2015 and 2018, while a New Zealand prime minister was not deposed in a one-room hall coup since 1997.

The bitter rivalry between Julia Gillard (left) and Kevin Rudd (just in August 2010 two months after she stabbed him) was not limited to the Labor Party

The bitter rivalry between Julia Gillard (left) and Kevin Rudd (just in August 2010 two months after she stabbed him) was not limited to the Labor Party

The bitter rivalry between Julia Gillard (left) and Kevin Rudd (just in August 2010 two months after she stabbed him) was not limited to the Labor Party

Tony Abbott in September 2015 followed Kevin Rudd as the first Australian prime minister to be overthrown in a coup d'etat

Tony Abbott in September 2015 followed Kevin Rudd as the first Australian prime minister to be overthrown in a coup d'etat

Tony Abbott in September 2015 followed Kevin Rudd as the first Australian prime minister to be overthrown in a coup d'etat

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