Former IBM employee, 57, accuses the company of having fired her because of age discrimination

A former IBM employee sues the IT company for being fired for age discrimination.

Terry Keebaugh, 57, was fired from her role as sales director in September 2016 as part of & # 39; restructuring & # 39 ;, one month reluctant to receive $ 573,000 in commissions for deals that ended at the end of the year.

According to a complaint lodged at the District District Southern District in New York on December 21, she received only $ 20,000 and was replaced by a younger employee who generated less revenue.

"IBM's age discrimination has been long and pervasive", claims the complaint.

& # 39; Since 2012, IBM implements twice a year of age-based repairs, sending loyal IBM users over the age of 50 to the chopping block while saving younger employees. & # 39;

Terry Keebaugh, 57 (photo) from Alpharetta, Georgia, was released from her role as Sales Director at IBM in September 2016 as part of a & # 39; restructuring & # 39;

Keebaugh (pictured) was a month shy of receiving $ 573,000 in commissions and said she received only $ 20,000 instead.

Keebaugh (pictured) was a month shy of receiving $ 573,000 in commissions and said she received only $ 20,000 instead.

Terry Keebaugh, 57 (left and right) from Alpharetta, Georgia, was fired from her role as Sales Director at IBM in September 2016 as part of a & # 39; Restructuring & # 39; She was embarrassed for a month by receiving $ 573,000 in commissions and receiving only $ 20,000 instead

In a lawsuit filed on December 21, she claims she was filed for age discrimination, a culture at IBM that describes a complaint as & # 39; long-standing and pervasive & # 39 ;. Pictured: a logo hangs outside the IBM offices at 590 Madison Avenue in New York on July 16, 2009

In a lawsuit filed on December 21, she claims she was filed for age discrimination, a culture at IBM that describes a complaint as & # 39; long-standing and pervasive & # 39 ;. Pictured: a logo hangs outside the IBM offices at 590 Madison Avenue in New York on July 16, 2009

In a lawsuit filed on December 21, she claims she was filed for age discrimination, a culture at IBM that describes a complaint as & # 39; long-standing and pervasive & # 39 ;. Pictured: a logo hangs outside the IBM offices at 590 Madison Avenue in New York on July 16, 2009

Keebaugh, from Alpharetta, Georgia, started working at IBM (International Business Machines) only a few months after graduating from Georgetown University and Catholic University in 1984, according to the complaint.

During the first ten years of her tenure, she worked in the offices of Maryland and Washington DC.

She worked herself up from marketing representative to her final title of director for travel and transport.

The complaint states that Keebaugh taught and controlled himself & # 39;the skills needed to manage the accounts successfully IBM has assigned it & # 39 ;.

Among her customers were AT & T, BellSouth, Cingular, MCI, Travelport and Verizon.

According to the complaint, there were no signs that Keebaugh performed worse or worse than her younger counterparts.

Reportedly, during her final evaluation at the end of the year in 2015, she received a PBC 1, the highest possible score within IBM.

She even got the assignment to work on IBM's Millennial Task Force initiative to hire younger employees in the fall of 2015.

The aim of this initiative is to transform IBM's workforce over a period of about four years to at least 75% millennials, ie employees in the 20 and 30 years, "the complaint writes.

Of course, as part of this initiative, IBM has always fired large groups of older workers who exceed the discriminatory age limit of IBM. & # 39;

A study by ProPublica showed that between 2013 and 2018 IBM had dismissed 20,000 American employees over 40.

That was 60 percent of the total job losses in the US during that period.

A ProPublica survey showed that between 2013 and 2018 IBM fired 20,000 American employees over 40. Pictured: page 1 of Keebaugh v International Business Machines Corp.

A ProPublica survey showed that between 2013 and 2018 IBM fired 20,000 American employees over 40. Pictured: page 1 of Keebaugh v International Business Machines Corp.

A ProPublica survey showed that between 2013 and 2018 IBM fired 20,000 American employees over 40. Pictured: page 1 of Keebaugh v International Business Machines Corp.

Keebaugh said she noticed that IBM was releasing its older employees before they could train the younger employees in the technology company's mainframes.

She suggested that the older employees put their best practices into a database so that the new employees could easily be trained.

This led on 30 August 2016 to a patent application for cognitive solutions & # 39; and a performance price from IBM for its application.

The next day, on September 1, 2016, her boss sent her a letter stating that she was being fired as part of a Skills Transformation Plan & # 39; and that her last day would be November 30.

In a telephone conversation with her boss, Keebaugh says she has been told that she is lowest from the low point & # 39; has been assessed in comparison with other employees when assessing skills.

However, the complaint mentions that it doubled sales for one customer in 2015 and that in December 2016 it had contracts that were expected to have a combined value of $ 100 million.

Keebaugh claims that she was replaced by a new, younger employee who was not able to generate that much income.

Fortunately, just a month after her last day, she was offered a job as Business Development Executive at Tata Consultancy Services.

Her lawsuit claims that IBM is guilty of age discrimination under the Federal Law on discrimination on grounds of age, on age discrimination under state law and on wage reductions under labor law.

IBM did not respond immediately to the request for comment from DailyMail.com.

.