Former employees of superyachts expose the harsh life of a stewardess, including the use and abuse of drugs

Superyacht stewardess Katy McGregor (pictured) is one of many former workers who come to share their stories about the dirty side of Australia's most glamorous work.

The confronted life of a superyacht stewardess has been uncovered in the wake of the death of Sinead McNamara.

It is believed that Ms. McNamara, a 20-year-old Australian Instagram model, took her own life working as a member of the crew aboard the $ 190 million Mayan Queen IV, docked on a Greek island.

In the months before her death, the young model seemed to be living the dream, jumping from island to island while working on a luxury boat for one of the richest men in the world.

But behind the glamorous publications in social networks hides a darker reality.

Former employees have lifted the lid on another side of the industry, where the only consistency is exhaustion.

Superyacht stewardess Katy McGregor (pictured) is one of many former workers who come to share their stories about the dirty side of Australia's most glamorous work.

Superyacht stewardess Katy McGregor (pictured) is one of many former workers who come to share their stories about the dirty side of Australia's most glamorous work.

Australian women have revealed that it is common to work in as little as four hours to sleep one night, months later, according to The Daily Telegraph.

A hostess, Katy McGregor, says she would be serving drinks to the guests until 3 am, and would then get up only a few hours later to prepare breakfast for them.

In the few hours that they sleep, their rooms are well closed.

The staff shares cabins that are so small that there is not enough space for two people to get up at once.

Mrs. McGregor says that customers would throw tea in their faces if they did not do it the way they wanted, and that's what their multi-millionaire boss wanted.

In a manual promoted by recruiters, it encourages potential hostesses to understand the needs of their lives to "revolve around the boat, the owners and the guests," and that anyone who takes on the job must set aside their own aspirations.

The report comes after the tragic and untimely death of Australian Instagram model and yacht stewardess Sinead McNamara (pictured) on a superyacht in a Greek port.

The report comes after the tragic and untimely death of Australian Instagram model and yacht stewardess Sinead McNamara (pictured) on a superyacht in a Greek port.

The report comes after the tragic and untimely death of Australian Instagram model and yacht stewardess Sinead McNamara (pictured) on a superyacht in a Greek port.

Australian flight attendant Sarah Begbie set sail for an overseas lifestyle in 2014, when her boyfriend, who worked aboard the luxury yacht, said her company was looking for personnel.

He could not have known the grueling work he was in, telling the Daily Mail that he would work absurd hours and sleep in a "jail cell."

The longest rest he would take on a 16-hour work day was two minutes, and he was expected to enslave customers late into the night.

Sydney native Tracey Zarowski also worked on superyachts, traveling in Europe for seven years.

She said that while work gave her the opportunity to see the world, the industry was bleak.

"Expectations are high … I met a girl who was a bit overweight and the owner did not like that, so she was fired," said Ms. Zarowski.

Another employee, Dana Brown (pictured), said that although the work was hard, she had a good trip

Another employee, Dana Brown (pictured), said that although the work was hard, she had a good trip

Another employee, Dana Brown (pictured), said that although the work was hard, she had a good trip

Other stewardesses agree, saying they were ordered to "turn a blind eye" to sexually inappropriate guests and ignore when they brought the prostitutes on board.

Another said that while prostitutes were a constant on boats, the unbridled use of drugs was more revealing, often visiting the billionaire owner with what she says was a needle in his arm.

One worker, Dana Brown of Moonee Beach, NSW, said that although customers expected everything to be "more than perfect," she enjoyed her year on the luxury boat.

"It's easy to make glamor, but it's not just traveling around the world taking amazing photos," he said.

Ms. Brown says that the worst part of her experience was being swept away in a luxurious lifestyle, earning thousands but also spending it.

The competition for jobs in yachts has increased in recent years, with some accounts guilty of Instagram to glorify what can be an exhausting and confrontational job.

The Daily Mail Australia does not suggest that drug use, inappropriate behavior, prostitution or labor exploitation occurred in Queen Maya IV.

The owners of billionaires advertise jobs on their luxury ships as the opportunity of a lifetime

The owners of billionaires advertise jobs on their luxury ships as the opportunity of a lifetime

The owners of billionaires advertise jobs on their luxury ships as the opportunity of a lifetime

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