Former DC National Guard officer accuses two generals of lying about delayed response to Capitol…

A former DC National Guard officer accuses two army generals of lying to Congress about the military’s response to the Jan. 6 Capitol riots.

Colonel Earl Matthews wrote a memo to the select subcommittee investigating the riot. Gene. Charles Flynn, who served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, and Lieutenant General Walter Piatt, Director of the Army Staff, “absolute and outright liars.”

At the time, Matthews was the senior attorney for then-DC National Guard Commander Major General William Walker.

The memo, defending Walker’s response, says the Pentagon’s November report was “full of factual errors.” That report found that army chiefs had to tell Walker twice to deploy the troops.

Walker, now retired from the military and serving as the House sergeant-at-arm, said he never received a call from Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy at 4:35 p.m., as claimed by Acting Defense Department Inspector General Sean. O’. donnel. He said he deployed the guard immediately after being cleared at 5:08 p.m.

Dormer DC, National Guard officer Colonel Earl Matthews, above, accuses two army generals of lying to Congress about the military’s response to the January 6 Capitol riot.

Gene.  Charles Flynn

Lieutenant General Walter Piatt

Colonel Earl Matthews wrote a memo to the select subcommittee investigating the riot.

The first members of the National Guard arrived around 5:40 p.m. after most of the violence had subsided.

In the memo obtained by politics, Matthews alleges Flynn and Piatt lied to Congress about their response to pleas to deploy the DC Guard quickly.

Matthews, who held high-level positions of the National Security Council and the Pentagon during the Trump administration, claims that on Jan. 6 at 2:30 p.m. on a conference call with senior military and law enforcement officials, then-Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund pleaded with ‘ for the immediate deployment of the guard to the Capitol.

According to Matthews, both Piatt and Flynn, the top military officers on duty, opposed the move.

“LTG Piatt stated that it would not be his best military advice to recommend to the Secretary of the Army that the DC National Guard be deployed to the Capitol at that time,” wrote Matthews, adding: “LTGs Piatt and Flynn stated that the view of having uniformed military personnel sent to the US Capitol would not be good.”

Matthews claimed that Piatt and Flynn instead suggested that Guardsmen take over traffic duties for the Capitol Police so they could better respond to the uprising.

Flynn then advised the Guard to hold out until it had the approval of Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy and then acting Secretary of Defense Chris Miller.

Both men have denied Congress that they said the Guards should not go to the Capitol.

“On Jan. 6, I didn’t tell anyone that the DC National Guard shouldn’t go straight to the Capitol,” Piatt wrote in response to a question from House Oversight Committee chair Carolyn Maloney, DN.Y., in June. .

The first members of the National Guard arrived around 5:40 p.m. after most of the violence had subsided

The first members of the National Guard arrived around 5:40 p.m. after most of the violence had subsided

Five died in the chaos of that day

Five died in the chaos of that day

Walker testified before Congress in March that Flynn and Piatt were concerned about “optics.”

Flynn denied ever having raised concerns about optics, which Matthews says in the memo is “outright perjury.” Matthews said both he and Walker “heard Flynn identify and say unequivocally that the optical presence of a National Guard on Capitol Hill was a problem for him. That it wouldn’t look good. Either Piatt or Flynn called “peaceful protesters.”

Flynn is the brother of retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, who has been subpoenaed by the commission.

Flynn and Piatt instead argued that the watch was not there to deploy immediately, with Flynn testifying before the House Oversight Committee in June that a “team of more than 40 officers and non-commissioned officers worked immediately to dispatch the 154 DC National Guard personnel.” from their current missions, reorganize them, equip them, and begin rearranging them to the Capitol.”

“If it doesn’t involve the willful and deliberate deception of Congress, then there’s nothing to worry about,” Matthews wrote of Flynn’s statement. “Flynn referred to 154 DC Guardsmen who were already on duty, trained to respond to disturbances, already familiar with the Washington, DC area, well equipped, and only delayed due to inaction and indolence at the Pentagon.”

Matthews said all Guard members were eager to deploy, and the delay was a break from the norm as they had quickly deployed the summer before to protect federal buildings during protests following George Floyd’s death.

Matthews also refers to a document distributed to military officials, the “Report of the Army’s Operations on January 6, 2021,” which he says is “worthy of the finest propagandist of Stalinism or North Korea.”

Matthews also suggests that Army Secretary McCarthy was missing for much of the afternoon and that DC National Guard leaders sometimes had trouble following him.

The Pentagon inspector general’s report found that McCarthy had to call Walker twice to order him to put the watch on hold. Matthews said this is “an outrageous claim…as offensive as it is inaccurate,” saying McCarthy himself was “incommunicado or unreachable for most of the afternoon.”

Army spokesman Mike Brady said in a statement that the agency’s actions on Jan. 6 were well documented and reported, and General Flynn and Lieutenant General Piatt have been open, honest and thorough in their sworn testimony with Congress and DOD investigators.

“We stand behind all testimony and facts provided to date, and strongly reject all allegations to the contrary,” he said.

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