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Former Chief of Staff John Kelly calls Trump “nasty” and “confused” about the attack on Jim Mattis

General John Kelly could be the next retired general to scold Donald Trump for enlisting active duty military in the midst of George Floyd protests – as former chief of staff called the president “ dirty ” for his comments on General Jim Mattis.

Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general, defended Trump’s former defense minister on Thursday after Mattis publicly criticized the president’s handling of the nationwide protests.

He also shot down Trump’s claim that he fired Mattis in 2018.

“The President did not fire him. He didn’t ask for his resignation, “Kelly said in a statement Washington Post interview Thursday afternoon. “The President has clearly forgotten how it really happened or is confused.”

The President tweeted a very positive tweet about Jim until he began to see their interpretation of his letter on Fox News. Then he became mean. Jim Mattis is an honorable man, ”said Kelly.

The interview was pending Kelly appea

Mattis resigned in late December 2018 and stayed until after the New Year, amid reports of mounting tensions between the Secretary of Defense and the President.

Although Mattis remains largely silent about his former boss, he released a statement on Wednesday criticizing Trump’s handling of protests that broke out across the country following the murder of George Floyd by a white police officer.

Mattis accused Trump of intentionally attempting to divide Americans and compared his actions to Nazi rhetoric to “ divide and conquer. ”

Anthony Scaramucci, who had a brief ten-day term as Trump's communications director, will hold a conversation with Kelly on Friday as part of a global leadership forum where the former chief of staff could take full power against his former boss

General John Kelly is the last retired general to speak out against the President and call his comments against John Kelly 'dirty'

General John Kelly is the last retired general to speak out against the President and call his comments against John Kelly 'dirty'

General John Kelly is the last retired general to speak out against the president and call his comments against John Kelly “nasty.” Anthony Scaramucci, who had a brief ten-day term as Trump’s communications director, will hold a conversation with Kelly on Friday as part of a global leadership forum where the former chief of staff could take full power against his former boss

Brutal fact check: John Kelly called Donald Trump's claim that he was 'confused' and dismissed Jim Mattis when Mattis left 'dirty'

Brutal fact check: John Kelly called Donald Trump's claim that he was 'confused' and dismissed Jim Mattis when Mattis left 'dirty'

Brutal fact check: John Kelly called Donald Trump’s claim that he was ‘confused’ and dismissed Jim Mattis when Mattis left ‘dirty’

Donald Trump is the first president in my life who doesn’t try to unite the American people – he doesn’t even pretend to try. He’s trying to divide us instead, “Mattis wrote in a statement first published by the Atlantic.

Other generals, including fired four-star Marine Corps General John Allen and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley, also spoke out against the President’s actions, especially regarding the enlistment of military personnel in the country’s capital.

Kelly could join them, as he announced shortly after Mattis’s defense that he will be interviewed by Anthony Scaramucci, who had a very short spell as White House communications director under Trump.

Trump responded quickly to Mattis in a two-part tweet peppered with inaccuracies.

“Probably Barack Obama and I have in common that we both had the honor of firing Jim Mattis, the most overrated general in the world. I asked for his resignation letter and felt great about it, ” Trump tweeted Wednesday evening.

His nickname was ‘Chaos,’ which I didn’t like, and turned into ‘Mad Dog,’ Trump added.

While Trump claimed he had fired Mattis, the general resigned after disagreeing with Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria.

His military call sign was ‘Chaos’ which stands for ‘Colonel Has Another Outstanding Suggestion’. He was nicknamed “Mad Dog,” which Mattis reportedly dislikes years before Trump took office.

His primary strength was not military, but rather personal public relations. I gave him a new life, things to do and battles to win, but he rarely “brought home the bacon.” I didn’t like his ‘leadership style’ or much else about him, and many others agree. Glad he’s gone! Trump added.

Mattis’ opinion was the first time he had openly and intentionally criticized his former boss.

Milley also put himself at odds with President Trump in a Thursday memo telling troops to “defend the constitution.”

In the memo, he also claimed that the National Guard was not under federal control, as Trump demands that governors activate reservist unity in their states.

The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a letter to top military leaders that the armed forces will continue to protect the Americans’ right to “freedom of expression and peaceful assembly,” as the President has called on troops to defend Washington, DC .

“We’ve all dedicated our lives to the idea that America is,” Milley wrote by hand, adding to the bottom of the letter. “We will remain faithful to that and the American people.”

The letter was an extraordinary public statement by the highest ranking U.S. military officer and was clearly addressed to the commander in chief.

Following the words of Mattis and two other former co-chairmen of the joint chiefs, it suggested the military’s serious doubts about Trump himself.

Milley’s attempt to distance himself from the President is because the General was recently reprimanded by retired generals after marching out of the White House as part of Trump’s entourage for a photo op in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church dressed in his combat uniform.

Some claimed that if he took part in the stunt, he would have had to wear his service or green uniform.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper defended Milley’s uniform choice, saying it was “ appropriate, ” after a series of former military leaders expressed anger at the behavior of both men and warned that they were politicizing the military.

Senator Lisa Murkowski, an Arkansas republican, defended Mattis’s statement as “fair and necessary and overdue.”

When asked if she can still support the President, she said, “I’m struggling with it.”

Despite the president’s insistence that a “ show of force ” be held in Washington D.C. to suppress rioters and violent protesters, the scene was much tamer Tuesday and Wednesday nights than before, with more peaceful protests across the country. In D.C., the local police said there were no arrests.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Mark Milley gave a public rebuke to Donald Trump in a memo on Thursday telling troops to “uphold the constitution,” as the president called on the military to defend Washington D.C. against George Floyd rioters.

In a handwritten note at the bottom of the memo, Milley reminded military leaders, “We have all dedicated our lives to the idea that America is” after defending the right of protesters to assemble.

Milley faced backlash from retired generals for marching out of the White House in his combat uniform rather than in his service or green uniform - intended for more formal settings such as the White House or Capitol Hill

Milley faced backlash from retired generals for marching out of the White House in his combat uniform rather than in his service or green uniform - intended for more formal settings such as the White House or Capitol Hill

Milley faced backlash from retired generals for marching out of the White House in his combat uniform rather than in his service or green uniform – intended for more formal settings such as the White House or Capitol Hill

His letter came after General John Allen (left) and former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis (right), both retired four-star generals of the Navy, disapproved of the President's decision to enlist the U.S. military to assist rioters.

His letter came after General John Allen (left) and former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis (right), both retired four-star generals of the Navy, disapproved of the President's decision to enlist the U.S. military to assist rioters.

His letter came after General John Allen (left) and former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis (right), both retired four-star generals of the Navy, disapproved of the President’s decision to enlist the U.S. military to assist rioters.

Despite the President's steadily increasing demand for violence to repress protesters, Wednesday night protests were generally peaceful across the country, with little to no violence, looting, riots, or arson raging through other days of protests.

Despite the President's steadily increasing demand for violence to repress protesters, Wednesday night protests were generally peaceful across the country, with little to no violence, looting, riots, or arson raging through other days of protests.

Despite the President’s steadily increasing demand for violence to repress protesters, Wednesday night protests were generally peaceful across the country, with little to no violence, looting, riots, or arson raging through other days of protests.

Retired Marine Corp. four-star General John Allen lashed out at Trump in his own opinion Wednesday, claiming that his actions amid violent nationwide riots over George Floyd’s death are “shameful.”

Allen, who was in command of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan and then an emissary of the international effort against ISIS, insisted that Trump’s presidency be “the beginning of the end of American democracy.”

“The fall of the United States into illiberalism may have started on June 1, 2020,” Allen wrote in an opinion published on ForeignPolicy.com. Remember the date. It may well be the beginning of the end of the American experiment. ‘

The retired general refers to the Monday June 1 outing when Trump stepped out of the White House with an entourage of the secret service, administration officials, assistants, and media, who walked through Lafayette Park, minutes free of protesters using tear gas and rubber bullets and arrived at St. John’s Episcopal Church for a photo op with his bible.

The stunt came amid days of peaceful and violent protests across the country about the death of George Floyd at the hands of a white agent in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Memorial Day.

Milley claimed in the memo that only the National Guard, a reservist unit of the military, is responding to the riot in activating governors – not the federal government.

“As members of the Joint Force – made up of all races, colors, and beliefs – you embody the ideals of our constitution,” Milley wrote in the letter to the heads of the military, navy, air force, national guard, and space force, and commanders of the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard, as well as the Commanders of the Combatant Commandos.

Retired four-star Navy General John Allen (pictured with an Iraqi tribal leader in 2007) denounced Donald Trump's actions amid nationwide turmoil, claiming his presidency could be the 'beginning of the end of the American experiment'

Retired four-star Navy General John Allen (pictured with an Iraqi tribal leader in 2007) denounced Donald Trump's actions amid nationwide turmoil, claiming his presidency could be the 'beginning of the end of the American experiment'

Retired four-star Navy General John Allen (pictured with an Iraqi tribal leader in 2007) denounced Donald Trump’s actions amid nationwide turmoil, claiming his presidency could be the ‘beginning of the end of the American experiment’

“Please remind your troops and leaders that we will uphold our nation’s values ​​and operate in accordance with national laws and our own high standards of conduct at all times,” he concluded.

Trump’s ally Lindsey Graham accused Mattis of “buying into” the “liberal media” story on Thursday morning.

“To General Mattis, I think you’re missing something here, my friend,” the South Carolina senator told Fox & Friends. “You miss the fact that the liberal media has taken every event in the past three and a half years and explained it on the presidency. ‘

“I’m not saying he’s flawless,” Graham continued in rare partial criticism of Trump, “but I’m saying you’re buying a story that I think is honestly unfair.”

However, he admitted that ‘Mattis has the right to express himself because of his military service.

“General Mattis has the right to express himself because he has served the country for a long time and endangered himself for the nation,” said Graham. “But all I would say to General Mattis is that from the moment President Trump wakes up, he goes to bed to destroy his presidency.”

He also called Trump’s Monday White House walk, across Lafayette Park to St. John’s Episcopal Church for a photo op with his Bible, claiming, “The fall of the United States into illiberalism may have started on June 1, 2020.”

‘[T]the president declared himself “ally of peaceful protesters”. But at the same time, just a few hundred yards away over Lafayette Park, the fully equipped riot police and troops violently and without provocation put the peaceful protesters there, basked and beat many of them, using a bang, riot. controls and pepper spray everywhere, ”Allen wrote

The Washington, D.C. scene was filled with peaceful protests on Wednesday - a break from the days before

The Washington, D.C. scene was filled with peaceful protests on Wednesday - a break from the days before

The Washington, D.C. scene was filled with peaceful protests on Wednesday – a break from the days before

High Five: Here's a DC resident high-five, a three-year present at the protests as a police barricade blocks a street leading to the White House

High Five: Here's a DC resident high-five, a three-year present at the protests as a police barricade blocks a street leading to the White House

High Five: Here’s a DC resident high-five, a three-year present at the protests as a police barricade blocks a street leading to the White House

In Atlanta, police knelt on the street with peaceful protesters

In Atlanta, police knelt on the street with peaceful protesters

In Atlanta, police knelt on the street with peaceful protesters

Thousands of boisterous - but still peaceful - protesters also marched through the streets of New York City to seek justice for George Floyd, a black man killed in an arrest by a white police officer

Thousands of boisterous - but still peaceful - protesters also marched through the streets of New York City to seek justice for George Floyd, a black man killed in an arrest by a white police officer

Thousands of boisterous – but still peaceful – protesters also marched through the streets of New York City to seek justice for George Floyd, a black man killed in an arrest by a white police officer

Former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump's leadership, revealing that he is 'angry and dismayed' at his handling of the George Floyd protests

Former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump's leadership, revealing that he is 'angry and dismayed' at his handling of the George Floyd protests

Former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump’s leadership, revealing that he is ‘angry and dismayed’ at his handling of the George Floyd protests

Utah National Guard soldiers stand on a police line as protesters gather to protest George Floyd's death in Washington D.C. on Wednesday night

Utah National Guard soldiers stand on a police line as protesters gather to protest George Floyd's death in Washington D.C. on Wednesday night

Utah National Guard soldiers stand on a police line as protesters gather to protest George Floyd’s death in Washington D.C. on Wednesday night

Members of the DC National Guard remained on guard outside the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday after keeping watch all night despite a reduction in tensions between protesters and law enforcement officers

Members of the DC National Guard remained on guard outside the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday after keeping watch all night despite a reduction in tensions between protesters and law enforcement officers

Members of the DC National Guard remained on guard outside the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday after keeping watch all night despite a reduction in tensions between protesters and law enforcement officers

A man yells at soldiers outside the White House on Thursday morning at sunrise. The protests in D.C. remained peaceful all Wednesday and Wednesday evenings

A man yells at soldiers outside the White House on Thursday morning at sunrise. The protests in D.C. remained peaceful all Wednesday and Wednesday evenings

A man yells at soldiers outside the White House on Thursday morning at sunrise. The protests in D.C. remained peaceful all Wednesday and Wednesday evenings

Members of the D.C. National Guard enlist after a brief rest at the Lincoln Memorial Thursday on what will be the seventh day of DC protests over the death of George Floyd. Demonstrations remained peaceful on Wednesday

Members of the D.C. National Guard enlist after a brief rest at the Lincoln Memorial Thursday on what will be the seventh day of DC protests over the death of George Floyd. Demonstrations remained peaceful on Wednesday

Members of the D.C. National Guard enlist after a brief rest at the Lincoln Memorial Thursday on what will be the seventh day of DC protests over the death of George Floyd. Demonstrations remained peaceful on Wednesday

Hundreds of protesters stayed as close to the White House as curfew approached at 11 p.m. and continued to sing until the early hours of Thursday morning

Hundreds of protesters stayed as close to the White House as curfew approached at 11 p.m. and continued to sing until the early hours of Thursday morning

Hundreds of protesters stayed as close to the White House as curfew approached at 11 p.m. and continued to sing until the early hours of Thursday morning

A soldier stands guard at the Lincoln Memorial, while thousands of peaceful protesters received a massive military presence on Wednesday after a week of conflict in the capital

A soldier stands guard at the Lincoln Memorial, while thousands of peaceful protesters received a massive military presence on Wednesday after a week of conflict in the capital

A soldier stands guard at the Lincoln Memorial, while thousands of peaceful protesters received a massive military presence on Wednesday after a week of conflict in the capital

Allen, who has also spent his entire life in public service, voiced his opposition to the President’s mobilization of the United States military to repel and repress rioters and condemned Trump’s comparison of the violent protesters who are destroying cities with “domestic terrorists” .

But the Brookings Institute president – often referred to as a liberal-centrist think tank – was usually disappointed in the use of force to pave the way for a presidential photo op.

‘[T]the president declared himself “ally of peaceful protesters”. But at the same time, just a few hundred yards away over Lafayette Park, the fully equipped riot police and troops violently and without provocation put the peaceful protesters there, basked and beat many of them, using a bang, riot. controls and pepper spray everywhere, ”Allen wrote.

On Monday, law enforcement forced peaceful protesters out of the park prior to Trump’s brief visit to the church across Pennsylvania Avenue from the North Lawn of the White House.

They used tear gas and non-lethal rubber bullets to disperse the crowd.

Senior defense officials told reporters that the two did not know that the park police and law enforcement had decided to vacate the square or that Trump was planning to visit the church.

They had been in Washington to coordinate with federal law enforcement officers, but were diverted to the White House to inform Trump of military preparations, officials said.

Board officials privately acknowledged Monday’s events and did not do justice to the administration.

Even some Republican lawmakers, usually in sync with the President, said Trump went too far in using force to pave the way for his less than five-minute visit to church.

On Tuesday, a White House senior official said the president of the aggressive action wanted to set an example for the rest of the country.

Trump pushed back against Mattis’s comments on Wednesday, claiming he is the “ most overrated general in the world ” after the naval veteran disapproved of the president’s leadership in light of the nationwide protests.

Mattis first publicly spoke out since his bitter December 2018 exit from the White House accusing Trump of being a “mockery of the constitution” in a fiery statement shared Wednesday.

While Mattis has hinted at criticism of his former boss in the past, he’s never been more excited about his disappointment with the president.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany defended the president and criticized Mattis as ineffective.

The article by “former secretary Mattis” is little more than a self-promotion stunt to appease the DC elite. President Donald Trump is the president of law and order who restored peace to the streets of our country. Mattis ‘little words pale in comparison to POTUS’ powerful action. ‘

In his statement, Mattis compared Trump’s tactic to “divide” the nation with that of the Nazis.

“Instructions given to our troops by the military departments before the Normandy invasion reminded the soldiers that” the Nazi slogan to destroy us … was “divide and rule,” he writes. “Our American answer is ‘In Union there is Strength’. We must call on that unity to overcome this crisis – convinced that we are better than our politics. ‘

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany condemned Mattis’s article calling it “a self-promotional stunt to appease the DC elite”

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had 'the nickname' Mad Dog 'years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn't like

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had 'the nickname' Mad Dog 'years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn't like

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had ‘the nickname’ Mad Dog ‘years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn’t like

Law enforcement fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters gathered in Lafayette Park to disperse the crowd for the president's photo in front of the church, which was set on fire during Sunday riots outside the White House

Law enforcement fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters gathered in Lafayette Park to disperse the crowd for the president's photo in front of the church, which was set on fire during Sunday riots outside the White House

Law enforcement fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters gathered in Lafayette Park to disperse the crowd for the president’s photo in front of the church, which was set on fire during Sunday riots outside the White House

His statement about Trump attempting to divide the nation follows immediately.

“We are witnessing the consequences of three years of this conscious effort. We are witnessing the consequences of three years without mature leadership. We can unite without him, using the strengths inherent in our civil society, ”he continues.

He emphatically takes Trump’s photo on Monday and writes that he finds us “angry and appalled” by the unfolding events.

“We know we’re better than the executive abuse we’ve seen in Lafayette Square. We must reject and hold responsible those who would mock our Constitution. At the same time, we need to remember Lincoln’s “better angels” and listen to them as we work to unite, “Mattis wrote.

He called for unity and calm. “This will not be easy, as the past few days have shown, but we owe it to our fellow citizens; to previous generations who bled to defend our promise; and to our children. ‘

His sizzling article comes as other former military officials, including former chief of the chief of staff, Admiral Mike Mullen, blamed Trump for “politicizing” the military.

He also shoots a statement by Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, whose job is already in danger, for his statement calling for governors to “dominate the battlefield” in American cities.

“We should reject any thought of our cities as a ‘battle space’ that should ‘dominate’ our uniformed army. At home, we are only allowed to use our army when the governors of the state ask for it, in very rare cases. As we militarized our response, as we saw in Washington, D.C., there is a conflict – a false conflict – between military and civil society, “he writes.

“It affects the moral ground that creates a trusted bond between men and women in uniform and the society they have vowed to protect and are a part of.”

Mattis also joined Allen in denouncing the “ bizarre photo ” Trump ordered when federal police, backed by the National Guard, cleared out peaceful protesters in Lafayette Park.

“When I joined the military some fifty years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the constitution,” writes Mattis. “I had never dreamed that troops taking the same oath would be ordered under all circumstances to violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens, let alone take a bizarre photo for the chosen commander-in-chief with military leadership next to it. ‘

Mattis indicated on his resignation that he felt obliged to keep comments to himself. “There is a time when I owe my silence. It is not eternal. It won’t be forever, “he said at the time.

While in office, Mattis stood out among other cabinet officials for not praising the president with excessive praise at public events.

Behind the scenes, there were clashes – and Mattis even told assistants that he preferred to “ swallow sour ” rather than Trump throw a $ 50 million “ Victory Parade ” into the nation’s capital.

Esper fought for his job on Wednesday, even as authorities try to conquer the streets of the country – as he contradicted President Donald Trump’s use of a special military authority, and the military announced a sudden reversal of a plan to begin it. withdraw from active service troops from around the world Washington.

The day was marked by a sudden turnaround and contradictory explanation of the photo operation that both Esper and the President joined on Monday, with no clear plan as to how mainstream forces, the National Guard, the local police and external forces work together to bring order to maintain .

About 200 members of the 82nd Army Airborne Division who allegedly left the D.C. were sent back to Fort Bragg, North Carolina on Thursday evening.

READ THE FULL CONDEMNATION OF DONALD TRUMP BY MARINE GENERAL JIM MATTIS

I’ve watched this week’s burgeoning events, angry and appalled. The words “Equal Justice Under Law” are carved into the pediment of the United States Supreme Court. This is exactly what protesters rightly demand. It is a beneficial and unifying question – which all of us should be able to figure out. We should not be distracted by a small number of offenders. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of conscientious people who insist that we live our values ​​- our values ​​as people and our values ​​as a nation.

When I joined the military about 50 years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the constitution. I had never dreamed that troops taking the same oath, under any circumstances, would be ordered to violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens – much less to take a bizarre photo for the chosen commander in chief, with military leadership next to it.

We must reject any thought of our cities as a “battle space” to “dominate” our uniformed army. At home, we are only allowed to use our army when the governors of the state ask for it, in very rare cases. As we militarized our response, as we have seen in Washington, D.C., there is a conflict – a false one – between military and civil society. It affects the moral ground that creates a familiar bond between men and women in uniform and the society they have sworn to protect and of which they themselves are a part. Maintaining public order rests with the marital status and local leaders who best understand and account for their communities.

James Madison wrote in Federalist 14 that “America united with a handful of troops, or without a single soldier, exhibits a more forbidding attitude toward foreign ambitions than America united with 100,000 veterans ready for battle.” We don’t have to militarize our response to protests. We must unite around a common goal. And it starts with ensuring that we are all equal before the law.

Instructies die door de militaire afdelingen aan onze troepen waren gegeven vóór de invasie in Normandië, herinnerden de soldaten eraan dat ‘De nazi-slogan om ons te vernietigen …’ Verdeel en heers ‘was. Our American answer is “In Union there is Strength”. We moeten die eenheid oproepen om deze crisis te boven te komen – het vertrouwen dat we beter zijn dan onze politiek.

Donald Trump is de eerste president in mijn leven die niet probeert het Amerikaanse volk te verenigen – hij doet zelfs niet alsof hij het probeert. Instead, he tries to divide us. We zijn getuige van de gevolgen van drie jaar van deze doelbewuste inspanning. We zijn getuige van de gevolgen van drie jaar zonder volwassen leiderschap. We kunnen ons zonder hem verenigen, gebruikmakend van de sterke punten die inherent zijn aan onze burgermaatschappij. Dit zal niet gemakkelijk zijn, zoals de afgelopen dagen hebben aangetoond, maar we zijn het onze medeburgers verschuldigd; aan vorige generaties die bloedden om onze belofte te verdedigen; en aan onze kinderen.

We kunnen deze moeilijke tijd sterker doorstaan ​​en met een hernieuwd gevoel van doel en respect voor elkaar. De pandemie heeft ons laten zien dat niet alleen onze troepen bereid zijn het ultieme offer te brengen voor de veiligheid van de gemeenschap. Amerikanen in ziekenhuizen, supermarkten, postkantoren en elders hebben hun leven op het spel gezet om hun medeburgers en hun land te dienen. We weten dat we beter zijn dan het misbruik van de uitvoerende macht die we op Lafayette Square hebben gezien. We moeten degenen in functie verwerpen en verantwoordelijk houden die onze Grondwet zouden bespotten. Tegelijkertijd moeten we de ‘betere engelen’ van Lincoln onthouden en naar hen luisteren terwijl we werken om ons te verenigen.

Alleen door een nieuw pad in te slaan – wat in feite betekent dat we terugkeren naar het oorspronkelijke pad van onze grondbeginselen – zullen we weer een land zijn dat in binnen- en buitenland wordt bewonderd en gerespecteerd.

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