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Chris Soules agreed to a two-year suspended prison sentence and will serve a two-year suspended sentence for his role in a fatal crash in 2017. Pictured: Soules listens with his lawyers in November 2017 during a hearing in Buchanan District Court

Chris Soules, the former star of ABC's The Bachelor, agreed to a two-year and two-year suspended sentence for his role in a fatal crash in April 2017.

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Earlier this year, Soules, 37, pleaded guilty of fleeing the scene of a personal injury accident in which 66-year-old Kenneth & # 39; Kenny & # 39; Mosher, from Aurora, was left dead after Mosley's truck with the rear-mounted tractor from Soules.

The farmer called 911, managed CPR and waited for paramedics to arrive, but he left before the police arrived, which is against the law in Iowa.

He was originally accused of leaving the scene of a fatal accident involving a maximum prison sentence of five years, the Des Moines Register.

However, he avoided going to court by declaring guilty to the reduced indictment.

In May 2019, Soules and his parents, Gary and Linda, already paid a $ 2.5 million in a settlement to the Mosher family.

Judge Andrea Dryer still has to accept the proposed sentence before it is final, according to the newspaper.

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Chris Soules agreed to a two-year suspended prison sentence and will serve a two-year suspended sentence for his role in a fatal crash in 2017. Pictured: Soules listens with his lawyers in November 2017 during a hearing in Buchanan District Court

Chris Soules agreed to a two-year suspended prison sentence and will serve a two-year suspended sentence for his role in a fatal crash in 2017. Pictured: Soules listens with his lawyers in November 2017 during a hearing in Buchanan District Court

Soules, 37 (photo, on his booking photo) killed a tractor on the back of Iowa in April 2017, with Kenneth & # 39; Kenny & # 39; Mosher, 66 was killed

Soules, 37 (photo, on his booking photo) killed a tractor on the back of Iowa in April 2017, with Kenneth & # 39; Kenny & # 39; Mosher, 66 was killed

He called 911 and managed CPR, but fled before the police arrived on site. Pictured: Mosher

He called 911 and managed CPR, but fled before the police arrived on site. Pictured: Mosher

Soules, 37 (left, in his booking photo) ended a tractor in Iowa in April 2017, where Kenneth & # 39; Kenny & # 39; Mosher, 66 (right) was killed. He called 911 and managed CPR, but fled before the police arrived on site.

Soules called 911, identified himself, waited for paramedics and even gave CPR himself, but he left the scene in a separate vehicle before the police arrived and went to his home in Arlington, Iowa – which is against state law, We are Iowa reported.

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The relevant law says in part: & # 39; a surviving driver must immediately report the accident to the law enforcement authorities and immediately return to the accident site or inform the law enforcement authorities where the surviving driver can be located & # 39 ;.

Most states consider it a crime to leave the scene of an accident in which someone is injured or dies, but the law of Iowa differs in that the surviving driver is obliged to be present when the police arrive.

& # 39; No other state has a similar requirement, & # 39; said the lawyers of Soules in earlier legal documents.

Prosecutors claim that the purpose of the law is to prevent drivers from avoiding liability for reckless driving, drunk driving or driving with a suspended or withdrawn driver's license.

Mosher was taken to an area hospital, where it was declared dead.

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Soules was arrested and initially accused of class D crime of leaving the scene of an accident resulting in death.

When the charge was lowered to the aggravated charge for leaving the scene of an accident resulting in injury, he pleaded guilty.

The lawyer of Soules noted that witnesses at the scene of the accident said: & there was no indication that Mr Soules was harmed & # 39 ;.

His legal team argued that the report for the conviction should not contain statements from Mosher's family members. This led to both the prosecution and the defense asking for a new hearing for the sentence.

Mosher, who owned an estate worth more than $ 3 million, had driven a John Deere tractor on the night of April 24, 2017, which Soules admitted crashing into from behind.

The former Bachelor star, who was known as & # 39; Prince Farming & # 39; during his stint in 2015 as the star of the Bachelor, was arrested and initially accused of a crime with a possible sentence of up to five years in prison
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The former Bachelor star, who was known as & # 39; Prince Farming & # 39; during his stint in 2015 as the star of the Bachelor, was arrested and initially accused of a crime with a possible sentence of up to five years in prison

The former Bachelor star, who was known as & # 39; Prince Farming & # 39; during his stint in 2015 as the star of the Bachelor, was arrested and initially accused of a crime with a possible sentence of up to five years in prison

Chris introduced Whitney Bischoff at the end of 2015, but they stopped the engagement shortly after the final was broadcast

Chris introduced Whitney Bischoff at the end of 2015, but they stopped the engagement shortly after the final was broadcast

Chris introduced Whitney Bischoff at the end of 2015, but they stopped the engagement shortly after the final was broadcast

The lawyer of Soules, Brandon Brown, noted in a statement that accompanied his client's guilty plea that the tractor that Mosher was driving was not lit on the & # 39; dark, cloudy night & # 39; from his death.

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& Although the law of Iowa requires slow-moving tractors to display flashing orange lights, neither Soules nor the independent witness of the accident have seen lights on the tractor, & # 39; said Brown.

& # 39; Based on witness statements, the tractor could have driven up to 6 miles per hour at the time of the accident. Mr. Soules was driving below the speed limit at the time of the collision.

& # 39; At these speeds, law enforcement and collision experts concluded that Soules responded reasonably given the closing speed and the known response time to seeing the slow-moving tractor. Mr. Soules was in an unavoidable accident. & # 39;

Brown said that Soules was the only person on site who delivered CPR to Mosher until paramedics arrived and only stopped & # 39; as soon as the compressions caused Mr Mosher's blood to come out & # 39 ;.

Brown told how Soules spoke to several people on the scene before they left, before the police arrived.

& # 39; All the witnesses on the spot agreed that there was no indication that Mr. Soules was harmed & & # 39 ;, said Brown.

& # 39; No one, even those who knelt near Mr. Soules while administering CPR, smelled alcohol or believed Mr. Soules had been drinking. & # 39;

He avoided prosecuting the trial by pleading guilty for less accusation of leaving a personal injury accident site. He largely disappeared from the public eye until he posted an Instagram photo of himself on July 4, 2018 (photo)

He avoided prosecuting the trial by pleading guilty for less accusation of leaving a personal injury accident site. He largely disappeared from the public eye until he posted an Instagram photo of himself on July 4, 2018 (photo)

He avoided prosecuting the trial by pleading guilty for less accusation of leaving a personal injury accident site. He largely disappeared from the public eye until he posted an Instagram photo of himself on July 4, 2018 (photo)

Soules previously pleaded guilty of driving under the influence in 2005 and was sentenced to one year in jail and a 60-day jail term.

Soules previously pleaded guilty of driving under the influence in 2005 and was sentenced to one year in jail and a 60-day jail term. Pictured: Soules during his stint on The Bachelor
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Soules previously pleaded guilty of driving under the influence in 2005 and was sentenced to one year in jail and a 60-day jail term. Pictured: Soules during his stint on The Bachelor

Soules previously pleaded guilty of driving under the influence in 2005 and was sentenced to one year in jail and a 60-day jail term. Pictured: Soules during his stint on The Bachelor

Soules first appeared in season 10 of The Bachelorette, where he finished third.

He became famous when he was selected as the star of season 19 of The Bachelor, where he became known as & # 39; Prince Farming & # 39 ;.

In the final, he introduced participant Whitney Bischoff, but the relationship ended shortly after the last episode was broadcast.

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He largely disappeared from the public eye and social media after the accident and was the first to return with a message on his Instagram story in March, and not with a real photo of himself until July 4.

& # 39; Happy Independence Day! & # 39; Soules wrote in the national holiday and added the hashtag & # 39; # america & # 39; to.

He last shared a photo of himself on the platform on April 20, 2017, just a few days before the crash that claimed Mosher's life.

Soules previously pleaded guilty of driving under the influence in 2005 and was sentenced to one year in jail and a 60-day jail term.

In 2001, when he was 19, he pleaded twice guilty of alcohol possession by minors and was also fined for having an open container in a car.

TEEN DRINKING, SPEED, DUI: RAPPLATE OF SOULES DISCLOSED

Soules & # 39; criminal record has more than a dozen convictions from the time he was 16 years old
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Soules & # 39; criminal record has more than a dozen convictions from the time he was 16 years old

Soules & # 39; criminal record has more than a dozen convictions from the time he was 16 years old

Chris Soules, the boisterous, all-American gentleman farmer from Iowa who charmed his heart in the hearts of TV viewers in The Bachelor, brought his late teens and twenties in and out of courtrooms with more than a dozen charges, most of which related to driving violations and alcohol consumption.

Records available on the Iowa Courts website provide a detailed overview of Soules & # 39; extensive history of run-ins with the law, dating back to 1998 and containing 13 guilty pleas, ranging from registration violations to alcohol use by minors and fighting .

In 1998, Soules, then 16 years old, was first convicted of speeding six to 10 miles over a speed limit of 55 mph and sentenced to a fine.

In 2001, Soules was found guilty of alcohol consumption by minors and failure to maintain control of a vehicle in two separate incidents. In both cases, the future reality star saw fines.

In May and August of that year, Soules was convicted twice for possession of alcohol under the age of. In the last incident he was also found guilty of driving with an open container of alcohol, a stop sign and speeding. Those cases also resulted in fines.

In February 2002, Soules was convicted of fighting and in March he was back in court on charges of leaving the scene of an accident, which was later reduced to a number of defective brakes.

Soules remained out of trouble for four years until he was sentenced in 2006 for his most serious charge – driving under the influence – and was fined more than $ 500. His sentence also included a year of probation.

In 2007, Soules was found guilty of speeding, and the same indictment brought him back to court in 2009.

Soule's last brush with the law before the 2017 crash and arrest took place in 2010 when he was convicted and fined for a breach of registration.

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