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The British TV presenter Cherry Healy went looking for a moist soil at Inside the Factory

Food scientist reveals five golden rules to prevent a moist soil from making cakes – including the use of two 20-cent pieces to measure the thickness of your pastry

  • Presenter Cherry Healy is looking for an answer to BBC 2's Inside the Factory
  • Nutritionist Dr. Stuart Farrimond tells her about the tips for perfecting the dough
  • Including pre-baking of the oven at the right temperature and using a metal dish
  • TV presenters also visit the Cherry Bakewell factory in the BBC show this evening at 8 p.m.
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Anyone who has seen the Great British Bake Off knows that a soaked soil is not the way to the hearts of the judges.

But how can you ensure that your cakes at home never endure this devastating fate?

British TV presenter Cherry Healy goes looking for the answer in tonight's Inside the Factory BBC 2 show and speaks with food scientist Dr. Stuart Farrimond.

He reveals that there are five golden rules to follow – including preheating the oven for just the right time, using a good cake pan and rolling the pasta to the right thickness.

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The British TV presenter Cherry Healy went looking for a moist soil at Inside the Factory

The British TV presenter Cherry Healy went looking for a moist soil at Inside the Factory

Nutritionist Dr. Stuart Farrimond revealed that the rules include preheating the oven to just the right time, using a good cake pan and rolling the pasta to the right thickness

Nutritionist Dr. Stuart Farrimond revealed that the rules include preheating the oven to just the right time, using a good cake pan and rolling the pasta to the right thickness

Nutritionist Dr. Stuart Farrimond revealed that the rules include preheating the oven to just the right time, using a good cake pan and rolling the pasta to the right thickness

Rule 1 – Pre-heat the oven for at least 15 minutes

Most of us put the oven in and wait for the light to go out before we put our cake in it. However, Stuart says that where we go wrong.

& # 39; Most people think they are preheating the oven, but they really don't – they turn it on and as soon as the light goes out they put their baking in it, & # 39; he said.

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& # 39; If the light goes out, it means that it is at the air temperature that you have set, but the walls of the oven can still be cold.

& # 39; Let it stand for at least 15 minutes so that the metal walls are at the same temperature – you must let the dough boil quickly if you want it crispy, & # 39; he added.

Cherry Healey learns how to make the perfect dough and how to prevent a moist soil when it comes to cakes, including for Cherry Bakewells

Cherry Healey learns how to make the perfect dough and how to prevent a moist soil when it comes to cakes, including for Cherry Bakewells

Cherry Healey learns how to make the perfect dough and how to prevent a moist soil when it comes to cakes, including for Cherry Bakewells

Rule 2 – Maximize the heat under your dish

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Not many of us think about heating our pie from below, but according to the food scientist, it is crucial to avoid soaking.

& # 39; Use a pizza stone or a heavy metal baking sheet, & # 39; he advises Cherry on tonight's show, & # 39; then heat comes from the bottom that will help it cook faster. & # 39;

Rule 3 – Choose the correct dish

As Cherry shows her cake shape – a ceramic, Stuart says they should be avoided, because the cake will then boil & # 39; slowly causing the fat to come out and creating a moist bottom & # 39 ;.

On the BBC 2 show of tonight Inside the Factory, a food scientist reveals that Cherry does not measure her pastry well

On the BBC 2 show of tonight Inside the Factory, a food scientist reveals that Cherry does not measure her pastry well

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On the BBC 2 show of tonight Inside the Factory, a food scientist reveals that Cherry does not measure her pastry well

& # 39; Choose a black metal bowl instead and it will heat up quickly – a silver one will reflect the heat & he adds.

While if you use a dish of tempered glass and combine it with your pizza stone underneath, the & radiated heat will help to go straight through and help bake the bottom of the dough.

Rule 4 – Roll the dough to the correct thickness

Cherry admits that she normally guessed the thickness of her pastry, but the food scientist says it should be between three and five millimeters for the best results.

The show also follows Cherry Healey and Gregg Wallace as they enter the Cherry Bakewell plant to see how they are made
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The show also follows Cherry Healey and Gregg Wallace as they enter the Cherry Bakewell plant to see how they are made

The show also follows Cherry Healey and Gregg Wallace as they enter the Cherry Bakewell plant to see how they are made

But how do you measure that?

When he shows Cherry his clever trick, he says: & Two pieces of 20 pence, stacked on top of each other, give you an ideal depth of how thick you want your cakes to be.

Rule 5 – Blind baking

The final baking hack is to partially bake your dough before you put the filling in – called blind baking.

Cherry adds some baking paper on top of the dough and some rice to prevent air pockets and then cooks it for 10 minutes, then three without the paper and rice.

Stuart says that this & # 39; will stop oozing the filling & # 39 ;. With all these tricks, Cherry bakes her first apple pie, which has no moist bottom – and she loves it.

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