Folk singer dragged from home and shot in the head in latest evidence that hardline Taliban rule has returned

A folk singer has been shot in the head in the latest evidence that the Taliban’s harsh rule has returned after a top Afghan operative fled after being ‘cruelly’ beaten by militants.

Fawad Andarabi was dragged from his home on Friday and killed by the militant group in the Andarab Valley in Kabul’s northern Baghlan province.

The killing has raised concerns about a return to the harsh form of rule imposed by the Taliban when they last took control of Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001.

Fawad Andarabi was dragged from his home on Friday and killed by the militant group in the Andarab Valley in Kabul’s northern Baghlan province (center photo)

At the time, the Taliban banned most forms of music as un-Islamic, according to CNN.

Afghanistan’s former interior minister, Massoud Andarabi, who is also from the district the family is named after, spoke publicly about his death.

“Taliban violence continues in Andarab. Today they brutally murdered the folkloric singer Fawad Andarabi, who simply brought joy to this valley and its people.

“As he sang here ‘our beautiful valley … land of our ancestors …’, he will not submit to the brutality of the Taliban,” he tweeted on Saturday.

In an interview with The New York Times, Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said “music is prohibited in Islam” when asked whether it would be banned again in public in Afghanistan.

One of Afghanistan's top female police officers is on the run in Kabul, fleeing from flat to flat after being 'mercilessly' beaten by the Taliban and US 'refusing' to rescue her

One of Afghanistan’s top female police officers is on the run in Kabul, fleeing from flat to flat after being ‘mercilessly’ beaten by the Taliban and US ‘refusing’ to rescue her

Karima Bennoune, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights, said: ‘serious concern’ over reports of Andarabi’s murder on Twitter.

She wrote: ‘As UN Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights, (with) UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador for Artistic Freedom Deeyah Khan, I express my deep concern at the reports of the horrific murder of singer #FawadAndarabi.

“We call on governments to demand that the Taliban respect the #human rights of #artists.”

This comes after one of the best female police officers in Afghanistan are on the run in Kabul, fleeing from flat to flat after being ‘brutal beaten’ by the Taliban and the US ‘refusing’ to rescue her.

Gulafroz Ebtekar, believed to be 34, became deputy head of criminal investigations in Afghanistan.

Gulafroz Ebtekar, believed to be 34, became deputy head of criminal investigations in Afghanistan and is seen as a high-profile role model for Afghan women

Gulafroz Ebtekar, believed to be 34, became deputy head of criminal investigations in Afghanistan and is seen as a high-profile role model for Afghan women

As a top official at the Ministry of the Interior, she was seen as a high-profile role model for Afghan women, with a well-known face in the media.

She now fears death after being beaten while trying to escape the Kabul airport, where she spent five nights at the gate.

She said: I sent messages to the embassies of many countries to save myself and my family, but to no avail.’

The policewoman shared how she found American soldiers in the chaos in Kabul and believed they were helping her fly abroad with her friend and relatives.

“We arrived at the refugee camp where the Americans were stationed,” she said.

“When the American soldiers were already around, I exhaled, thinking we were finally safe.

Gulafroz had studied for a master's degree at a top police academy in Russia (pictured), but the embassy in Moscow also refused to help

Gulafroz had studied for a master’s degree at a top police academy in Russia (pictured), but the embassy in Moscow also refused to help

‘I speak a little bit English. I explained that it was not safe for us to stay in Kabul. They checked our documents. I had my ID, passport and police certificates with me.

‘We were asked, ‘Where do you want to go?’ I replied: “It doesn’t matter, to a safe country where we have a chance to survive”.

“They looked at me and answered rather boldly, ‘Okay’. And they asked a soldier to show us the way. I thought they would escort us to a plane or provide security.’

They first escorted her to a busy street where a terrorist attack took place, she said.

‘We didn’t want to leave, then the soldier raised his weapon: ‘Get out of here.’ So we hit the road. At that moment I didn’t want to live anymore.’

She said her

She said her “previous life” was over and she was “warned” about her job in the police force six months ago by the Taliban

Gulafroz had studied for a master’s degree at a top police academy in Russia, but the embassy in Moscow also refused to help because she didn’t have it a Russian passport or residence permit.

She told the newspaper: “I had dreamed of changing life in Afghanistan. First, when it comes to women in the police force. And I did it.

‘When I returned to my homeland, I got a job at the Ministry of the Interior and soon got a fairly high position.

“I became Deputy Chief of Investigation for the Ministry of the Interior of Afghanistan.”

After she was ejected from the airport, she went home to learn from her mother that the Taliban had come for her while she was gone.

She moved into the first of three flats she has used to avoid the hands of the militants.

Speaking on television, she added that she

Speaking on television, she added that she “fought against extremism, terrorism, advocated for the rights of women and children and believed in the best for our country.”

When she again tried to escape to the Kabul airport, Taliban guards beat her with “weapons and stones.”

Her former female police colleagues have asked her ‘what will happen to us’, but she has no answers.

She said: ‘I spoke on television, spoke out on social networks, fought against extremism and terrorism, advocated for the rights of women and children and believed in the best for our country.

She said her “previous life” was over and that she had been “warned” about her job six months ago by the Taliban.

She said: ‘The Taliban wrote me letters saying that I should not work in the police, that I did not have the right to report women’s rights.

Nazar Mohammad (pictured center) was filmed being removed from his home in Kandahar province by the Taliban

Nazar Mohammad (pictured center) was filmed being removed from his home in Kandahar province by the Taliban

“What are women’s rights? Why are you posting your photos on Facebook and Instagram?” These are the comments I received from them about six months ago.

“And now they’re in power.”

She warned, “I don’t think the Taliban will ever change. They will not agree that a woman works, participates in public life and is free.

“When the Taliban came to Kabul 20 years ago, they made the same promises for two months as they do now.

Taliban militants ‘have sex with corpses’

Taliban gangs have sex with dead bodies after going door to door looking for women to take as slaves, claims a woman who fled the regime to India.

A female former Afghan police officer – identified only as Muskan – said militants don’t care “whether the person is dead or alive.”

The woman, who has since fled to India, told News18 that Taliban militants “also rape dead bodies.

“They don’t care if the person is dead or alive. Can you imagine this?’

“And then they created their own state, their own courts, beat and killed people. For me, this is the most dangerous group of terrorists.’

She said: ‘I was the first woman in Afghanistan to graduate from a police academy with a master’s degree and hold such a high position.

‘After me, about 4,000 Afghan women went to police universities. I am not afraid to speak openly, for I have nothing left.

‘The state of Afghanistan no longer exists, there is no freedom. I’ve been fighting all along for a normal life on the land.’

In late July, an Afghan comedian continued to mock the Taliban as fighters dragged him from his home before later executing him by firing squad.

In a viral video, Nazar Mohammad, better known as Khasha Zwan, can be seen sitting in the back of a car with an insurgent on either side of him – one of them brandishing a Kalashnikov machine gun.

According to human rights watch, Zwan was killed by the Taliban in Kandahar after the city fell to the jihadists.

He was known for routines that fooled the Taliban through song and dance, including some that were uploaded to his TikTok account.

In the video of his final moments, Mohammad continues to joke about the group after his capture, which caused the Taliban fighter to his right to punch him in the face.

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