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The Sheriff & # 39; s Office of Brevard County in Florida has announced that it will redesign its patrol cars on October 27, including an American flag (photo) and an emblem & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39;

& # 39; We are standing by & # 39 ;: Florida sheriff REFUSES & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39; remove from patrol cars after the atheistic group has filed a statement that officers must rely on the law rather than a deity & # 39;

  • Brevard County Sheriff & # 39; s Office in Florida announced the decision on October 27
  • Atheists and agnostics said the emblems & # 39; inappropriate and exclusively & # 39; to be
  • Sheriff Wayne Ivey said that the new motto has support from the community and that it does not cost taxpayers money
  • Boniface Heirs Automotive Group sponsors the change of the patrol cars
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A Florida sheriff says he has no intention of putting stickers with the motto & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39; remove them from the office patrol cars.

On October 27, the Brevard County Sheriff office on Facebook announced that it would redesign its marked vehicles with new graphics in the coming years.

These include an American flag on the side of the car and the phrase & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39; – the official motto of the US and Florida – on the back.

It was criticized by atheists and agnostics, who said the emblem & # 39; inappropriate and exclusive & # 39; was reported Florida today.

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But Sheriff Wayne Ivey has doubled the stickers and says the motto is to stay here.

The Sheriff & # 39; s Office of Brevard County in Florida has announced that it will redesign its patrol cars on October 27, including an American flag (photo) and an emblem & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39;

The Sheriff & # 39; s Office of Brevard County in Florida has announced that it will redesign its patrol cars on October 27, including an American flag (photo) and an emblem & # 39; In God We Trust & # 39;

Atheists and agnostics said the emblems with the motto (bottom right) & # 39; inappropriate and exclusive & # 39; to be

Atheists and agnostics said the emblems with the motto (bottom right) & # 39; inappropriate and exclusive & # 39; to be

Atheists and agnostics said the emblems with the motto (bottom right) & # 39; inappropriate and exclusive & # 39; to be

The Freedom From Religion Foundation, based in Madison, Wisconsin, condemned the department's actions and called for the emblems to be removed

& # 39; The time that taxpayers spend on placing religious messages on patrol cars is beyond the reach of the secular government & # 39 ;, wrote FFRF co-president Annie Laurie Gaylor in a letter to Ivey,

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& # 39; Furthermore, at a time when citizens are becoming increasingly suspicious of the actions of law enforcement officials nationwide, it is frightening and politically questionable for the local police to report to citizens that officers rely on the judgment of a deity rather than at the discretion of the law. & # 39;

But Ivey defended the plan and said that the community supports the change and that it does not cost the taxpayers money.

According to Florida Today, an organization called Boniface Heirs Automotive Group is sponsoring the work.

& # 39; They are more likely to wake up thin tomorrow morning than to get that motto out of our & # 39; s! & # 39; Ivey told Fox news on Thursday.

Sheriff Wayne Ivey (photo) said the new motto has support from the community and that it doesn't cost the taxpayer money

Sheriff Wayne Ivey (photo) said the new motto has support from the community and that it doesn't cost the taxpayer money

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Sheriff Wayne Ivey (photo) said the new motto has support from the community and that it doesn't cost the taxpayer money

& # 39; I personally believe that our country is at a tipping point and if we, as strong patriotic Americans, do not stand for the principles of our great nation, we will lose the America we all know and love! & # 39;

And he doubled and said to Fox & Friends on Friday: & # 39; It was good to do and we are there. & # 39;

County Commissioner John Tobia told Florida Today that he supported Ivey's decision.

& # 39; If the sheriff, as our main law enforcement officer, has investigated this issue and finds that placing & # 39; In God We Trust & on patrol cars a need that will measurably reduce crime rates in Brevard County, I accept that determination, & # 39; he said.

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& # 39; In God We Trust & # 39; first appeared on an American currency in 1864 because of the rising religious sentiment during the civil war, according to the website from the US Department of Finance.

In July 1956, President Dwight Eisenhower signed a law obliging the motto to appear in all US currencies.

Proponents of the separation of church and state have the expression & # 39; god & # 39; criticized, but supporters say the word & # 39; God & # 39; does not refer to a specific god and therefore does not support any religion.

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