Florida Residents Say Releasing a BILLION Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in Keys is TERRORISM

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The Florida Keys will soon be buzzing with nearly a billion ‘fraken squitoes’ – gene-hacked mosquitoes aimed at eradicating a disease-carrying mosquito.

The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District (FKMCD) and Oxitec, a British biotech company, begin this week with the first-ever US release of genetically engineered (GE) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which will yield a billion over two years. .

The project aims to reduce the number of Aedes aegypti, one of the many mosquito species that can carry dengue, chikungunya, zika and yellow fever.

Floridians, however, are calling on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to end “ this live experiment, ” saying they are being subjected to terrorism by the FKMCD.

The trial will begin this week, with the first phase releasing up to 144,000 GE mosquitoes over the next 12 weeks, but will see the end reach one billion in Monroe County.

Floridians, however, are calling on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to end `` this live experiment, '' saying they are being subjected to terrorism by the FKMCD.  The trial begins this week, with the first phase releasing up to 144,000 GE mosquitoes over the next 12 weeks, but will see the end rise to a billion in Monroe County.

Floridians, however, are calling on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to end “ this live experiment, ” saying they are being subjected to terrorism by the FKMCD. The trial begins this week, with the first phase releasing up to 144,000 GE mosquitoes over the next 12 weeks, but will see the end rise to a billion in Monroe County.

The GE mosquitoes, developed by Oxitect, are adapted to pass on a particular protein when they mate, which prevents female offspring from surviving the next generation.

With fewer females in each succeeding generation, the researchers hope that the region’s overall mosquito populations will decline, along with the transmission rates of diseases transmitted by mosquito bites.

The modified mosquitoes – of the Aedes aegypti species – are all male, and the company claims that because only female mosquitoes can bite, there is no risk for humans to release them.

Barry Wray of the Florida Keys Environmental Coalition said, “People here in Florida don’t allow the genetically engineered mosquitoes or human experiments.”

The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District (FKMCD) and Oxitec, a British biotech company, begin this week with the first-ever US release of genetically engineered (GE) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which will yield a billion over two years.

The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District (FKMCD) and Oxitec, a British biotech company, begin this week with the first-ever US release of genetically engineered (GE) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which will yield one billion over two years.

Islamorada native Virginia told Donaldson Futurism that on April 23, two men in uniform came to her home to do “mosquito control” and asked her to join a new pest control program.

Donaldson hastily agreed and signed a waiver, but later said to Futurism, “I don’t even know what I drew.”

And later found out that she had consented to the mosquito genetic experiment.

Dana Perls, Food and Technology Program Manager at Friends of the Earth, said: “This is a dark moment in history. The EPA must immediately stop this live experiment.

“The release of genetically engineered mosquitoes puts Floridians, the environment and endangered species at risk in the midst of a pandemic.”

In March, a panel of independent experts testified against the Florida Keys Mosquito Council that GE mosquitoes can also pose a significant threat to sensitive ecosystems and human populations in the Florida Keys.

Megan Hull, a resident of Islamorads, spoke at the council meeting where she expressed her grievances.

“I think this criminal that we are being bullied in the experiment,” she said in March.

“I think it’s criminal that we are exposed to this terrorism by our own Florida Keys Mosquito Control Board.”

Residents say the EPA does not require peer review or preliminary trials on caged GE mosquitoes before they are released into the wild.

The project aims to reduce the number of Aedes aegypti, one of the many mosquito species that can carry dengue, chikungunya, zika and yellow fever.

The project aims to reduce the number of Aedes aegypti, one of the many mosquito species that can carry dengue, chikungunya, zika and yellow fever.

Oxitec and FKMCD’s claim that the GMO mosquito experiments will be monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is misleading.

CDC has agreed to revise the data provided by Oxietc, but that data will not include independent health assessments.

A Florida Keys resident who was against Oxitec’s GMO mosquitoes received an email response from the CDC on April 12, 2021, stating, “ The CDC is not formally involved in an evaluation at this time. CDC does not supervise the trial, and CDC does not intend to conduct health assessments before, during, or after the trials. ‘

However, Oxitec has said it has amassed extensive amounts of research to show that the mosquitoes are safe, and has previously conducted trial versions in Brazil, where the mosquitoes were effective in reducing disease transmission rates.

If the mosquitoes prove to be effective, Oxitec hopes they can be used in regions with a high prevalence of mosquito-born diseases such as Dengue fever and Zika virus.

“I truly believe we are fighting one of the most consistent regulatory failures we can ever imagine,” Wray said.

We all looked like four biotechnology experts, each enthusiastic about the technology that Oxitec had developed and each wise enough to say that without proper scientific rigor and caution, we risk unnecessary results and errors.

The problem is that the discovery of those errors and consequences may not be realized until the damage is more serious and irreversible.

“All of this benefits a for-profit company that gets to market faster with a product that has yet to prove nothing but failure in all of its historical field trials.”

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