Floating barrier of half a mile deployed to collect five tons of garbage every month

The floating 2,000-foot (600-meter) long boom is towed today

Cleaning in the Pacific begins with a boom: a half-mile-long floating barrier, known as System 001, deployed to collect five tons of trash each month from the Great Pacific Garbage Plot

  • The patch is three times the size of France and is estimated to contain more than 1.8 billion pieces of plastic
  • The huge floating barrier, known as System 001, has been deployed
  • The floating 2,000-foot (600-meter) long boom is towed today

Daily Mail Reporter

Yesterday, a half-mile floating boom designed to clean a vast portion of plastic waste from the Pacific Ocean was launched.

The huge floating barrier, known as System 001, has been deployed to collect five tons of garbage a month from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The gable, which has a skirt 10 feet below it, uses tidal currents and wind to float in areas of high plastic concentration and trap debris.

The floating 2,000-foot (600-meter) long boom is towed today

The floating 2,000-foot (600-meter) long boom is towed today

Lying between California and Hawaii, the patch is three times the size of France and is estimated to contain more than 1.8 billion pieces of plastic, weighing 80,000 tons.

The 2,000-foot (600-meter) long floating arm is towed today to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. That's an island of garbage twice the size of Texas.

The floating barrier aims to act as a coastline, trapping the plastic.

The patch is three times the size of France and is estimated to contain more than 1.8 billion pieces of plastic

The patch is three times the size of France and is estimated to contain more than 1.8 billion pieces of plastic

The patch is three times the size of France and is estimated to contain more than 1.8 billion pieces of plastic

The system was created by The Ocean Cleanup, an organization founded by Boyan Slat.

The 24-year-old innovator from the Netherlands says he is eager to see if the device can run efficiently and withstand big waves.

Slat says he looks forward to the moment when the first boat loaded with plastic returns to port.

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