WhatsNew2Day - Latest News And Breaking Headlines
Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Flavored ice cubes of breast milk from women who have had Covid-19 can help fight the infection

Ice cubes flavored with the breast milk of women who have had Covid-19 can help fight the life-threatening infection, scientists say.

Dutch researchers claim to have found antibodies in the breast milk of 30 mothers after they recovered from Covid-19.

Breast milk could therefore be used to protect the most vulnerable in the event of a second wave, experts claimed.

They said the best way to give this would not be a drink, but rather suck an ice cube.

This, they claim, makes the antibodies more likely to stick to the mucous membranes of the mouth and airways, where they can prevent the coronavirus from spreading further into the body.

The blood of Covid-19 survivors, rich in antibodies, is already being used to treat patients, including in the UK.

The use of human milk is a ‘strange picture’, the Dutch team admits, but if it can help prevent infection, it should not be frowned upon.

Thousands of women have responded to a campaign asking them to donate 100 ml of breast milk for further research.

The thick yellowish milk (colostrum) produced in the first days after birth is particularly rich in antibodies to other viruses, such as chicken pox, according to the NHS.

Flavored ice cubes with the breast milk of women who have had Covid-19 can help fight the life-threatening infection, say Dutch scientists (stock)

Flavored ice cubes with the breast milk of women who have had Covid-19 can help fight the life-threatening infection, say Dutch scientists (stock)

The antibodies are not destroyed by pasteurization - a heating process needed to kill pathogens before it can be consumed by other people. This means that they can be pasteurized and then made into a form of ice or ice cubes and given to patients suffering from the infection (supply of milk cubes)

The antibodies are not destroyed by pasteurization - a heating process needed to kill pathogens before it can be consumed by other people. This means that they can be pasteurized and then made into a form of ice or ice cubes and given to patients suffering from the infection (supply of milk cubes)

The antibodies are not destroyed by pasteurization – a heating process needed to kill pathogens before it can be consumed by other people. This means that they can be pasteurized and then made into a form of ice or ice cubes and given to patients suffering from the infection (supply of milk cubes)

The first study, a collaboration between the Emma Children’s Hospital of Amsterdam UMC and other institutes, started in April.

Dr. Britt Van Keulen, of the Dutch Breastmilk Bank of Amsterdam UMC, said: ‘We know that breast milk protects newborn children against respiratory infections.

‘That’s because there are antibodies in breast milk. Breastfeeding allows the mother to pass on her own antibodies to her child. ‘

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as the coronavirus.

The role of antibodies is to hold on to invading pathogens and to mark them so that other immune cells, such as T cells, can kill.

Neutralizing antibodies can kill the virus itself, rather than just tagging it so that other immune cells can attack.

Researchers recruited 30 women who had already recovered from Covid-19.

They claim lab experiments have shown that the antibodies they found are powerful enough to stop the spread of the coronavirus, The times reported.

CAN BREAST MILK HELP TO FIGHT COVID-19?

Breast milk contains antibodies passed on from the mother that boost a baby’s immune system and help fight infections and viruses.

This is in addition to the last three months of pregnancy, when antibodies from the mother are passed through the placenta to her unborn baby, the NHS says.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as the coronavirus.

The role of antibodies is to hold onto foreign substances such as the coronavirus and mark it so that other immune cells, such as T cells, can kill. Neutralizing antibodies can kill the virus itself.

The transfer of antibodies from mother to baby gives the baby ‘passive immunity’.

If they catch an infection, they are more likely to be able to fight it with the help of immune cells passed on to them by their mothers.

The amount and type of antibodies passed to the baby depend on the mother’s immunity.

For example, if the mother has had chickenpox, she has developed immunity to the condition and some of the chickenpox antibodies will be passed on to the baby.

But if the mother has not had chicken pox, the baby will not be protected.

Passive immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella can last for up to a year, so the MMR vaccine is given just after your baby’s first birthday.

If a mother has had Covid-19, it can be suspected that she has antibodies that will be passed on to the baby.

But it’s not clear how long antibodies to Covid-19 last, and scientists say it’s clear they can wane after just a few weeks.

Therefore, if a woman has had Covid-19 in the early months of her pregnancy, it is not clear whether she would still have antibodies to it when she gives birth.

Many people infected with Covid-19 in March and April no longer have antibodies.

In addition, some people with Covid-19 never build up an antibody response anyway, because other immune cells, such as T cells, fight the virus quickly.

Bottle feeding can be expensive for many parents struggling with the financial burden of a new baby.

Formula milk also has varying levels of nutrients determined by the supplier, but cannot contain antibodies produced by the mother’s immune system.

But no findings seem to have been published in a medical journal or elsewhere.

The antibodies are not destroyed by pasteurization – a heating process necessary to kill pathogens in breast milk before it can be drunk by other people.

This means they can be pasteurized and then processed into some form of ice or ice cubes and given to patients suffering from the infection, it is claimed.

Dr. Van Keulen said the antibodies must come into contact with mucous membranes – a layer of cells around body organs that secrete a thick fluid that protects the inside of the body from pathogens such as viruses.

That is why an ice cube is the most attractive shape to give to the breast milk, as it requires sucking.

Dr. Van Keulen said: ‘If you drink it, it disappears quickly. Our idea is to give it in the form of ice cubes, so it takes a little longer, there is longer contact with the mucous membranes to make that layer. ‘

Hans Van Goudoever, head of Emma Children’s Hospital: ‘We think that after drinking the milk the antibodies attach themselves to the surface of our mucous membranes. There they attack the virus particles before they enter the body. ‘

Treatments would not be widely available due to the limited amounts of breast milk.

But it can also be used to protect vulnerable people, such as elderly residents during an outbreak in a care home or young children.

‘In that case, breast milk could possibly be used for risk groups if a second corona wave occurs,’ says Dr. Van Goudoever.

‘You should give the milk for ten days. After that, the virus hopefully left that nursing home. ‘

Dr. Van Keulen: ‘It may be a strange image, elderly people who drink mother’s milk.

“But if it protects against a deadly virus, we just have to overcome that shyness.”

The researchers called for thousands of women to donate breastmilk, even though they had not been formally diagnosed with Covid-19, to find out how common the antibodies are in breastfeeding mothers.

The response was “overwhelming,” a hospital spokesperson told The Brussels Times.

About 5,000 women have responded to the call to donate 100 ml of breast milk in the name of coronavirus research.

The researchers initially said it would be ‘difficult’ to get responses as few pregnant women are known to have had a Covid-19 infection.

‘Women who have been infected with corona unnoticed may also have produced antibodies that can be found in the milk,’ says Dr. Van Goudoever.

‘We are therefore looking for mothers who are (possibly) infected with the corona virus, but even if this is not the case, a mother can register.’

The team will now try to find out what percentage of breast milk contains antibodies.

It remains to be seen whether breast milk is indeed effective as a preventive treatment against the coronavirus.

But Dr. Van Keulen is hopeful because of information about a pregnant woman during the 2003 outbreak of SARS – a related human coronavirus.

She said: ‘This woman became seriously infected with the SARS virus and gave birth to a healthy baby at 38 weeks.

‘Antibodies to that virus have been found in her breast milk. If you know that the coronavirus is very similar to the SARS virus – they come from the same family – then I think that corona antibodies can also pass into breast milk. ‘

Antibodies are a promising line of Covid-19 treatment because they can be used to boost the immune systems of people struggling to fight the infection.

The blood of Covid-19 survivors, rich in antibodies, is already being used to treat patients.

The treatment – which has been used for other infections for about a century – works with the liquid part of the blood known as restorative plasma.

This antibody-rich plasma is injected into Covid-19 patients who are struggling to produce their own antibodies in the hope that it can help clear the virus.

Other therapies in the pipeline, such as injections, use genetically engineered antibodies in the lab.

Given in doses like a vaccine, scientists say antibodies can give people the ability to avoid being affected by the disease.

.