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Five words you should never use in a job interview – and STAR method that guarantees you the job

Experts have shared the five words you should never use in an interview – and why they can harm your chances of finding a job.

Jason Walker of Hays recruitment agency said words like “clear”, “we” and “workaholic” should be avoided at all costs in interviews, while Manager at Randstad Technologies Ian Scott said there are other generic words to dump.

Speak against Search, the expert shared the five words that you should no longer use, and the STAR method that will guarantee you the job.

Jason Walker of Hays recruitment agency said words like “clear”, “we” and “workaholic” should be avoided in interviews at all costs (stock image)

1. Of course

The first word you need to remove from your jargon in the job interview is “clear,” which Mr. Walker said is never good at a job.

“Interviews are usually the first time we meet a candidate, so you should not assume that something is obvious,” he told the publication.

“We try to gain insight into the experience and how well you fit into an organization, so stay away from implying that we already know the answer.”

Instead of saying clearly, you state your achievements and achievements without the qualifying word.

2. We

Although there is no “I” in “team,” Mr. Walker said that you should not use the word “we” too much if you are looking for a job.

“The interviewer does not want to hear” we have done XYZ in our department, “he explained.

Much more important is the exact role that you have played in their success and how you have become the owner.

If you find yourself saying “we” often, try to make a conscious effort to think about your own personal role.

3. Workaholic

One of the most cliché-shaped words that is constantly sent away in an interview environment is ‘workaholic’ – which is both a general and often a lie.

Mr. Walker said that if you think you can “wake” your interviewer by saying that you are a “workaholic,” then you need to think again.

This is not an acceptable word when you are asked about your weaknesses.

The recruitment professional said you should instead try to call it a “fun to practice” skill that you could develop such as public speaking.

The employer will respect you all the more for this.

Instead of choosing cliché words, you should instead look for words that illustrate how you handled something and follow the SMART technique (situation, action, task, results)

Instead of choosing cliché words, you should instead look for words that illustrate how you handled something and follow the SMART technique (situation, action, task, results)

Instead of choosing cliché words, you should instead look for words that illustrate how you handled something and follow the SMART technique (situation, action, task, results)

4. Challenge

According to the manager of Randstad Technologies Ian Scott, challenge is not a word that should be in your lexicon for job interviews.

If you say something like “I love a challenge,” he explained that this is very rarely followed by a good explanation of what challenges them or “even examples of challenges they have met.”

It is always better to be specific and use an example, because this ensures that you do not lie.

5. Motivated by change

The last sentence to avoid is “motivated by change,” as Mr. Scott stressed that to a certain extent anyone looking for a new job is “motivated by change.”

If you like change, he said, it’s important to ensure that “your story is consistent throughout the interview.”

What does the STAR method stand for?

* Situation

* Task

* Promotion

* Results

What is the STAR method and how do you get that job?

Instead of using one of these words, both experts have shown that you are much better off trying the STAR method for success.

The STAR method stands for Situation, Task, Action, Results.

“A STAR answer is an answer in which you answer concisely, but directly by sketching the situation, identifying the task you want to perform, describing your own personal actions and telling the results,” the experts said.

This type of answer always impresses an interviewer and is best used after a question that begins with “describing a time” and “sharing an example of a situation where.”

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