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Forbidden: Saudi men were not allowed to use camera phones for a while because they feared that men would use them to photograph women in secret and publish them on the internet without the consent of the test subjects

Five Saudi men sentenced to 32 years in prison and 4,500 lashes for holding a Valentine's Day with & # 39; unrelated women, drinking and dancing & # 39;

  • The men were arrested by the Commission for the promotion of virtue and prevention of vice
  • All five agreed to the charge of unauthorized seclusion with unrelated women, dancing and drinking
  • A judge decides the fate of the six women who are caught with the men
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Five Saudi men have been sentenced to 32 years in prison and 4,500 lashes by a criminal judge in Saudi Arabia – for holding a Valentine's party.

The men were breaking the law caught in a rented retirement home in the Al-Farouq area of Buraidah Qassim province and accused of having a party with women who had no connection with them, drinking and dancing.

Police of the Commission for the promotion of virtue and prevention of vice (CPVPV) complete the men with the help of security patrols for their crimes together with six women on February 14.

Forbidden: Saudi men were not allowed to use camera phones for a while because they feared that men would use them to photograph women in secret and publish them on the internet without the consent of the test subjects

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Forbidden: Saudi men were not allowed to use camera phones for a while because they feared that men would use them to photograph women in secret and publish them on the internet without the consent of the test subjects

The men have all yielded to the accusations, including unauthorized seclusion with unrelated women, dancing and drinking.

A judge decides the fate of the six women.

The Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice is the religious police of the Saudi Arabian government or mutaween (which means pious) to enforce Sharia law in the Islamic nation.

In total it has 3,500 to 4,000 police officers who have a strict religious code for civilians.

Members patrol the streets to check dress codes, a strict separation of men and women, salat prayer by Muslims during prayer times and other behaviors that it believes are commanded by Islam.

The mutaween (CPVPV) to be known for having full beards and wearing their headscarves (ghutrah or shemagh) without an agal and often from the lower classes of Saudi Arabia.

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The body has widespread powers to detain and insult perpetrators and to close businessesd are used directly by the king. The organisation's budget for 2013 was $ 390 million.

In a separate case, Raif Badawi, a Saudi blogger recently fell under the spell of the authorities and is faced with ten years in prison, a thousand strokes and a million-year fine for insulting Islam & # 39 ;.

Mr. Badawi & # 39; was arrested in June 2012 and charged with cyber crime and disobedience to his father – a crime in Saudi Arabia – in connection with his Saudi Liberal Network website.

The site contained articles that were critical of older religious figures such as the Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia, according to Human Rights Watch.

He had initially had seven years in prison and 600 lashes, but a court of appeal had destroyed that sentence and ordered a new trial.

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Amnesty International called the new sentence & # 39; excessive & # 39; and said that Badawi was a & # 39; prisoner of conscience & # 39; is. His website has been closed since his first test.

Saudi Arabia & # 39; s King Abdullah: The king employs a religious police to enforce conduct that goes against strict Islamic rule

Saudi Arabia & # 39; s King Abdullah: The king employs a religious police to enforce conduct that goes against strict Islamic rule

& # 39; Prisoner of conscience & # 39 ;: Saudi blogger Raif Badawi

& # 39; Prisoner of conscience & # 39 ;: Saudi blogger Raif Badawi

King Abdullah: The king employs a religious police force to enforce conduct that goes against strict Islamic rule. This has even hit bloggers such as Raif Badawi, who is sentenced to ten years in prison for insulting Islam

Citizens of Saudi Arabia are constantly encouraged to inquire about others who break the law.

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Punishment for many violations is serious, often with beatings and humiliation and foreigners are not excluded from arrest.

THE STRICT LAW OF SHARIA THAT SHOULD NOT BE BROKEN IN SAUDI ARABIA

Tthe government-backed mutaween patrols the country to ensure that the laws are enforced:

  • THey, prevent the population from dealing with & # 39; frivolous & # 39; Western customs such as Valentine's Day
  • They ensure that drugs including alcohol are not traded
  • They verify that women wear the abaya, a traditional all-embracing black cloak
  • They ensure that men and women who are seen together in public are connected
  • They ensure that women do not smoke in public
  • A ban on camera phones came into force in 2004, but was subsequently destroyed that same year
Middle East ally: David Cameron receives an honor from King Abdullah. Human Rights Watch says Saudi Arabia, a loyal ally of the West in the Middle East, has a long history of suppressing free speech

Middle East ally: David Cameron receives an honor from King Abdullah. Human Rights Watch says Saudi Arabia, a loyal ally of the West in the Middle East, has a long history of suppressing free speech

Middle East ally: David Cameron receives an honor from King Abdullah. Human Rights Watch says Saudi Arabia, a loyal ally of the West in the Middle East, has a long history of suppressing free speech

Philip Luther, director of the Middle East and North Africa program at Amnesty International, urged Saudi authorities to destroy blogger Badawi's conviction.

& # 39; The decision to condemn Raif Badawi to 10 years in prison and 1000 lashes is outrageous, & # 39; he said.

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Human Rights Watch said Saudi Arabia, a loyal ally of the West in the Middle East, has a long history of suppressing free speech.

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