Five Cabinet Ministers & # 39; Swaying Towards a Second Referendum & # 39;

The actual deputy of the Prime Minister, David Lidington, is understood to be holding meetings with both Tories and members of other parties to see how a second referendum could occur

Five Cabinet Ministers are expected to consider a second referendum if parliamentarians can not reach an agreement the following month.

Philip Hammond, David Gauke, Amber Rudd, Greg Clarke and Theresa May's unofficial substitute David Lidington have all raised the discussion to offer a new public vote on the Brexit, The Times reported.

It comes as Amber Rudd calls for Tory MPs to reach through the aisle if necessary to prevent the country from crashing on the rocks under a No Deal outcome.

Secretary for work and pensions Mrs. Rudd said today that although she is expected to be accused of betrayal, she is not sure that the Prime Minister's deal will ever have sufficient support from Conservative MEPs. to get through a deeply divided Parliament.

None of the cabinet's five ministers – all loyalists from May – have committed to a second public vote and everyone can support a parliamentary deal, a source told The Times.

They suggest that the Prime Minister will re-plan her meaningful vote for the first week of the new year, so that Parliament has time to debate other options.

The actual deputy of the Prime Minister, David Lidington, is understood to be holding meetings with both Tories and members of other parties to see how a second referendum could occur

The actual deputy of the Prime Minister, David Lidington, is understood to be holding meetings with both Tories and members of other parties to see how a second referendum could occur

Secretary of work and pensions Amber Rudd (photo) said it was time to compromise, which she described as something that people in the real world always do

Secretary of work and pensions Amber Rudd (photo) said it was time to compromise, which she described as something that people in the real world always do

Secretary of work and pensions Amber Rudd (photo) said it was time to compromise, which she described as something that people in the real world always do

They are supposed to believe that if a series of votes on alternative deals comes to Parliament and they are all rejected, a referendum could be the only way to break the national deadlock.

A minister said: & # 39; All options must be voted.

I would expect that they would all be voted out. When you have finished all options and the lack of support for nothing, the House of Commons has stalled.

& # 39; Another vote is another way to solve the impasse. & # 39;

Another cabinet source said: & # 39; The strategy here is step by step to get every other option off the table, so there is no option but a second referendum. & # 39;

And Amber Rudd, who writes in today's Daily Mail, said: & # 39; Voices may be lost when we are on our way to a solution, but so be it. They will all help us to come to something that is workable and possible. & # 39;

She said that Tory-colleagues & # 39; s & # 39; not & # 39; could be sufficiently convinced to support their leader's deal and added: "We have to try something else.

The next move from Labor?

Yesterday, Jeremy Corbyn accused Ms. May that they & # 39; run the clock & # 39 ;.

He said: & # 39; The last 24 hours have confirmed that the Brexit deal from Theresa May is dead in the water.

The prime minister has totally failed in her attempts to make any meaningful changes to her failed deal. & # 39;

On Wednesday, Mrs. May won 200 votes against 117 among her own MPs in a no-confidence motion, leaving them immune for the challenge for a year.

But she is still potentially vulnerable to a vote of no confidence in Parliament, moved by Labor.

Labor & # 39; s moment to strike is now & # 39; much closer & # 39; drawn, according to a shadow cabinet member.

But he added that this would depend on the attitude of the DUP, whose votes give Ms. May her parliamentary majority.

We look like hawks, & # 39; he told The Guardian.

& # 39; Something that people do all the time in the real world, but seems so strange in our political culture – to deal with others and be willing to reach consensus. & # 39;

In contrast to the incremental plan that emerged in the cabinet, Ms. May threatened EU leaders with a rapid parliamentary vote on her own plan yesterday, unless they offered her further concessions on the Irish backstop.

She would almost certainly lose that voice, a result that could disable the negotiations and cause a no-deal Brexit.

Ms. May spoke her ultimatum to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanual Macron, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, and EU President Donald Tusk at a private meeting in Brussels .

Downing Street last night refused to confirm that Ms. May had threatened to torpedo her own deal, but sources said she was considering a Commons vote next week.

Of the five cabinet minister who is considering a second referendum, it is understood that David Lidington is having a conversation, both within and outside his party, about how it can happen.

He is likely to face considerable opposition from fellow conservatives, voted to take Ms. May off the lead on Wednesday evening.

Former Secretary of Rail Jo Johnson has threatened that as many as 100 Tory MPs would support a second referendum if the alternative was not a deal Brexit

Former Secretary of Rail Jo Johnson has threatened that as many as 100 Tory MPs would support a second referendum if the alternative was not a deal Brexit

Former Secretary of Rail Jo Johnson has threatened that as many as 100 Tory MPs would support a second referendum if the alternative was not a deal Brexit

But Jo Johnson, who resigned as transport minister last month, said that senior figures are seriously considering & # 39; what question could appear in the vote if a second referendum were to take place.

When he said that the vote had changed late, he acknowledged that there was no evidence, however, that Ms. May softened her opposition to a public vote.

But he added: "Two thirds of conservative MPs are absolutely terrified of a Brexit without a deal.

& # 39; If it is still seriously on the table in March, at least 100 of us will vote for a second referendum. Then she will have to do it. & # 39;

The Oxford University election expert, Stephen Fisher, told The Guardian that a second referendum, a choice between Brexit on its terms and residence in the EU, is possibly the worst option of Mrs. May.

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