Fitness coach Sophie Allen who transformed her body by changing her diet shares a typical eating day

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A fitness coach who transformed her body by changing her approach to eating has shared her typical daily diet to stay lean and healthy.

Sophie Allen, 31, from Sydney, alternates between ‘cutting’, ‘bulking’ and ‘maintaining’ the same amount of calories, depending on what her specific goals are at the time.

‘Bulking’ is a period of eating in a strategic calorie surplus to gain muscle mass, while ‘cutting’ is eating in a calorie deficit to lose weight.

“Maintenance” is how you eat if you want to stay at the exact weight you are.

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A fitness coach who transformed her body by changing her approach to eating has shared her typical daily diet to stay lean and healthy (Sophie Allen now pictured)

Sophie Allen (pictured), 31, from Sydney, alternates between 'cutting', 'bulking' and 'maintaining' the same amount of calories depending on what her specific goals are

Sophie Allen (pictured), 31, from Sydney, alternates between ‘cutting’, ‘bulking’ and ‘maintaining’ the same amount of calories depending on what her specific goals are

'I'm currently servicing.  I eat about 2000 calories a day and keep track of what I eat intermittently,

'I'm currently servicing.  I eat about 2000 calories a day and keep track of what I eat intermittently,

‘I’m currently servicing. I eat about 2000 calories a day and track what I eat intermittently,” said Sophie, adding that she has both “sweet” and “savory” breakfasts.

‘I’m currently servicing. I eat about 2000 calories a day and keep track of what I eat intermittently,” Sophie wrote in a… Instagram video.

Sophie’s typical day on a plate

BREAKFAST ONE: Oats with berries and cocoa nibs.

BREAKFAST TWO: Poached eggs on rice toast with avocado, with coffee.

LUNCH: Kangaroo sausages with white rice and mixed vegetables.

SNACK: Dark chocolate.

SUPPER: Grass-fed steak with vegetables, mushrooms and potato chips.

For the 31-year-old, this normally means two decent breakfast options, lunch, an afternoon snack and a hearty dinner high in fiber, complex carbohydrates, protein and vegetables to keep her full the next day.

On this occasion, Sophie started with a ‘sweet’ breakfast of oats with berries and cocoa nibs.

She followed this up with a savory option of two poached eggs on rice toast with avocado and she will often make a coffee at home.

At noon Sophie eats a protein-rich meal.

This time it was kangaroo sausages with white rice and mixed vegetables including zucchini, tomatoes and carrots.

Around 3 p.m. before a workout, she likes to eat a bite of dark chocolate.

“Supper is grass-fed steak with vegetables, mushrooms, and lots of chips,” Sophie said.

The 31-year-old strongly believes in the fact that you don’t have to deprive yourself to achieve what you want with your health and fitness goals.

At lunch, Sophie eats a protein-rich meal of kangaroo sausage, white rice and mixed vegetables, and dinner is steak, greens and chips (pictured)

At lunch, Sophie eats a protein-rich meal of kangaroo sausage, white rice and mixed vegetables, and dinner is steak, greens and chips (pictured)

At lunch, Sophie eats a protein-rich meal of kangaroo sausage, white rice and mixed vegetables, and dinner is steak, greens and chips (pictured)

Sophie admitted that her goal with her weight used to be to be 'lean', so she would starve herself, thinking it would give her what she wanted (pictured before and now)

Sophie admitted that her goal with her weight used to be to be ‘lean’, so she would starve herself, thinking it would give her what she wanted (pictured before and now)

Sophie admitted that her goal with her weight used to be to be “lean,” and so she would starve herself because she thought it would give her what she wanted:

“All I wanted was to be skinny, shrink parts of myself that I didn’t love,” she previously wrote on Instagram.

“Skinny was ‘in’ when I started my fitness journey…then I decided to blow up the ideas I had about beauty and focus on getting STRONG.”

Sophie said she valued cardio over strength training, and would eat as little as possible — about 1,400 calories a day — to “binge” cheat meals on weekends.

What Sophie Did Before (2017)

* Exercise six times a week.

* Eating 1,400 calories.

* Under-restored.

* Not aimed at increasing strength.

* Weekend ‘cheat’ meals.

* Never rest.

What Sophie Is Doing Now (2021)

* Exercise six times a week.

* Eating 1,400 calories.

* Under-restored.

* Not aimed at increasing strength.

* Weekend ‘cheat’ meals.

* Never rest.

It took her months of researching why she wasn’t seeing the results she wanted to completely change her thinking and approach.

“I was chronically undereating, not recovering enough, spinning my wheels, not moving forward, burning all the muscle I gained, building no strength or solid technique…no wonder I wasn’t going anywhere,” she said.

“It took me a while to figure out the style, frequency, type, volume and intensity that I could recover from to get the best results for my goals.

“Now I’ve taken my body through building phases to fuel my sessions to build the muscle I was looking for.”

She added: ‘I rest hard, I eat a lot, I sleep a lot, I lift a lot and I’m tired of a**.’

Sophie said she prioritized cardio over strength, eating just 1,400 calories a day — only to binge on cheat meals on weekends (pictured before and now)

Sophie said she prioritized cardio over strength, eating just 1,400 calories a day — only to binge on cheat meals on weekends (pictured before and now)

Sophie (pictured) works out three to four times a week, eats 2,000 calories or even slightly more on any given day and follows a flexible diet approach

Sophie (pictured) works out three to four times a week, eats 2,000 calories or even slightly more on any given day and follows a flexible diet approach

Sophie works out three to four times a week, eats 2000 calories or even a little more on any given day, and follows a flexible diet approach.

Flexible dieting is a popular and simple weight loss plan that allows you to eat foods that fit within your specific daily macronutrient goals.

This way of eating gives dieters freedom in their food choices, which can help them maintain their weight over time and create a positive and healthy relationship with food.

She said if you want to lose weight, you have to train smart and not hard to see results.

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