Fishes become pessimistic and heartbreak when they are torn apart from their true loved ones, researchers think

Fishes become pessimistic and heartbreak when they are torn apart from their true loved ones, researchers think

  • Female cichlids were sad and madly in love after their chosen partner was removed
  • They were less likely to be interested in food and would probably not reproduce
  • Research shows that people are not the only species who get attached to a loved one

Humans are not the only species whose mental state is affected when they lose their loved one.

Female cichlids, a type of monogamous fish that mainly live in South America, become depressed and madly in love when their partner is removed and placed with a non-preferred male partner, a new study has found.

Researchers came to this conclusion after the female fish took longer to examine boxes that contained food or were empty, and which showed symptoms of apathy.

Female cichlids, a type of fish that mainly resides in South America, become depressed and madly in love when their partner is removed and placed with a non-preferred male partner

Female cichlids, a type of fish that mainly resides in South America, become depressed and madly in love when their partner is removed and placed with a non-preferred male partner

DO FISH FISH EMOTIONAL BONDS?

In what is believed to be a first-of-his-kind study, researchers say they have found that fish can form an attachment to sexual partners.

Through a series of cognitive tests, they discovered that female fish are more likely to be a & # 39; half-full & # 39; mental state if they stayed with their chosen partners.

Moreover, they sprayed faster and tended more often to their eggs.

The study, published Tuesday in the Proceedings journal of the Royal Society B, was conducted by researchers at the University of Burgundy in Dijon, France.

It is also believed to be the first study to show that non-human species can also form attachments to sexual partners.

& # 39; As far as we know, it is the very first demonstration of emotional ties between partners in non-human species & # 39 ;, said Francois-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, one of the co-authors of the study Inside Science.

To prove this hypothesis, the researchers conducted a series of cognitive tests in a group of 33 female cichlids.

Over the course of two weeks, they carefully studied how the behavior of the female fish changed when they were combined with a male fish that they had not picked themselves.

When women were paired with a male fish they preferred, they were released sooner, tended to their eggs, and were more likely to look at their surroundings with a & # 39; half full & # 39; perspective.

A female fish, on the other hand, which was accompanied by a non-preferred male fish, was less likely to spawn.

Scientists then gauged the mood of the female fish with a new series of experiments.

Over the course of two weeks, researchers carefully examined how the behavior of the female fish changed when they were combined with a male fish that they had not plucked themselves

Over the course of two weeks, researchers carefully examined how the behavior of the female fish changed when they were combined with a male fish that they had not plucked themselves

Over the course of two weeks, researchers carefully examined how the behavior of the female fish changed when they were combined with a male fish that they had not plucked themselves

They placed two different types of containers in the aquarium tent: the ones with a black lid that were empty and another with a white lid that contained a treat.

Over time, the fish had to learn by trial and error which containers had a treat and which did not.

Researchers discovered that women who accompanied the male they rejected either stopped studying the containers or did not examine them at all.

This claims that women who have been torn away from their true love are more likely to have a & # 39; pessimistic prejudice & # 39; or take on a depressive view.

In the meantime, their female counterparts staying with their chosen husbands soon discovered the white containers, again showing that half-full perspective of glass.

& # 39; When we remove the female's partner, she exhibits pessimistic behavior, & # 39; Dechaume-Moncharmont told Inside Science.

& # 39; We demonstrated in this study that in the sexual context, the presence or absence of the partner can influence the emotion of the woman. & # 39;

CAN FISH FEEL PAIN JUST AS PEOPLE?

People joking about having the memory of a goldfish may need to think again after scientists discover that fish can remember for up to a week or two.

Canadian researchers trained fish to find food before they were removed from the tank for 12 days.

When the fish were later reintroduced, motion-tracking software revealed that they could identify the precise location of the food.

The study looked at African Cichlids, a popular aquarium species that has previously been shown to exhibit complex behaviors, including aggression.

Based on the assumption that they would be able to perform advanced memory tasks, each fish was trained to enter a certain zone of an aquarium to be fed, with each training lasting twenty minutes.

After three days the fish got a rest period of 12 days.

They were later reintroduced into their training arena and their movements were recorded with movement software.

This software revealed that the fish returned to where it found food.

Scientists believe that the fish recalled previous training experiences and were able to reverse this association after further training sessions where food reward was associated with another stimulus.

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