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Fishermen have posed with huge bull sharks caught near a popular tourist beach. Deckhand Jaii Wagner (photo) drew late Tuesday morning in the three-meter-long monsters near Magnetic Island in northern Queensland

Monster bull sharks have been caught near a popular tourist beach – just a week after two British snorkelers were caught just 78 km away.

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Commercial fisherman Nathan Rynn and deckhand Jaii Wagner pulled the three-meter-long monsters in the Whitsundays late on Tuesday evening.

The 300 kg beasts were caught at 10.30 am just 1.5 km from Horseshoe Bay, in the popular tourist town of North Queensland, Bowen.

The 3.1 m and 2.9 m female bull sharks were caught in fishing nets just a week after British tourist Alistair Raddon, 28, bit his right foot while his friend Danny Maggs, 22, got a leg bite on Airlie Strand.

Fishermen have posed with huge bull sharks caught near a popular tourist beach. Deckhand Jaii Wagner (photo) drew late Tuesday morning in the three-meter-long monsters near Magnetic Island in northern Queensland

Fishermen have posed with huge bull sharks caught near a popular tourist beach. Deckhand Jaii Wagner (photo) drew late on Tuesday night in the three-meter-long monsters near Magnetic Island in northern Queensland

Mr. Rynn, who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before another person was killed in the Great Barrier Reef as the number of bull sharks increased.

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& # 39; They are probably the most dangerous of all sharks because they hunt in packs, & # 39; he told Daily Mail Australia on Wednesday morning.

Mr. Rynn said that the number of sharks tended to increase in the run-up to a full moon, which is a week away in the Whitsundays.

& # 39; The chance of someone being attacked during this consecutive moon the following week is extreme & # 39 ;, he said.

& # 39; They must close the beaches here for at least two weeks. & # 39;

Horseshoe Bay is the most popular snorkeling spot in northern Queensland north of Airlie Beach.

They were caught at 10.30 am just 1.5 km from Horseshoe Bay, in the popular tourist town of Bowen in northern Queensland. The female adult bull sharks of 3.1 m and 2.9 m were caught in fishing nets

They were caught at 10.30 am just 1.5 km from Horseshoe Bay, in the popular tourist town of Bowen in northern Queensland. The female adult bull sharks of 3.1 m and 2.9 m were caught in fishing nets

They were caught at 10.30 am just 1.5 km from Horseshoe Bay, in the popular tourist town of Bowen in northern Queensland. The female adult bull sharks of 3.1 m and 2.9 m were caught in fishing nets

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& # 39; Every year there are tens of thousands of gray nomads and international backpackers & # 39 ;, said Mr. Rynn.

Rynn said the number of sharks had exploded since September, when the Labor Government of Queensland removed bait lines and nets designed to catch sharks near popular beaches before reaching the water close to the shore.

& # 39; We only notice that they are getting closer to the shore probably because the drum lines don't catch them first & # 39 ;, he said.

Commercial fisherman Nathan Rynn (photo), who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before another person was killed in the Great Barrier Reef as the number of bull sharks increased

Commercial fisherman Nathan Rynn (photo), who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before another person was killed in the Great Barrier Reef as the number of bull sharks increased

Commercial fisherman Nathan Rynn (photo), who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before another person was killed in the Great Barrier Reef as the number of bull sharks increased

Mr. Rynne, who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before someone was killed again in the Great Barrier Reef when the number of bull sharks soared (he is depicted with the jaws of another bull shark that this earlier was caught year)
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Mr. Rynne, who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before someone was killed again in the Great Barrier Reef when the number of bull sharks soared (he is depicted with the jaws of another bull shark that this earlier was caught year)

Mr. Rynne, who catches fish between Cardwell and Bowen, said it was only a matter of time before someone was killed again in the Great Barrier Reef when the number of bull sharks soared (he is depicted with the jaws of another bull shark that this earlier was caught year)

The 160 drum lines were removed from 27 beaches two months ago after the Federal Court upheld the successful legal challenge of animal rights organization Humane Society International against the long-standing shark culling program in Queensland in the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of the state government failed in its attempt to destroy the April decision of AAT.

Less than a year before the drum lines were removed, Melbourne Christidis, 33, medical researcher was killed in Melbourne after an attack on Cid Harbor on Whitsunday Island during a trip with friends and colleagues in November 2018.

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That tragedy followed two separate attacks – also in the port of Cid – against Tasmanian woman Justine Barwick and 12-year-old girl Hannah Papps in Melbourne within 24 hours in September.

Last week, British tourist Alistair Raddon (photo), 28, bite off his right foot while snorkeling at Airlie Beach

Last week, British tourist Alistair Raddon (photo), 28, bite off his right foot while snorkeling at Airlie Beach

Last week, British tourist Alistair Raddon (photo), 28, bite off his right foot while snorkeling at Airlie Beach

His friend Danny Maggs (photo), 22, took a bite while snorkeling in the Whitsundays

His friend Danny Maggs (photo), 22, took a bite while snorkeling in the Whitsundays

His friend Danny Maggs (photo), 22, took a bite while snorkeling in the Whitsundays

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Bull sharks are very difficult to catch, even though they swim in packs.

Mr. Rynn described as & # 39; extremely rare & # 39; the prospect of catching bull sharks in its fishing nets.

& # 39; They usually just eat their way out, we are lucky to catch them, & # 39; he said.

Until last year's tragedy, Queensland had only experienced one death on a shark control beach since drum lines were introduced in 1962.

Mr. Rynn, who has been a fisherman for more than ten years, said that the number of sharks had increased so much that he had to replace his nets four times a year and cost him $ 20,000.

The caught sharks will be converted into dog food and bait from crab pots, while the jaws and fins will be sold to restaurants or fish shops.

Horseshoe Bay (photo) is the most popular snorkeling beach in North Queensland north of Airlie Beach. Rynn said he had noticed that sharks were getting closer to the shore since the drum lines were removed in September

Horseshoe Bay (photo) is the most popular snorkeling beach in North Queensland north of Airlie Beach. Rynn said he had noticed that sharks were getting closer to the shore since the drum lines were removed in September

Horseshoe Bay (photo) is the most popular snorkeling beach in North Queensland north of Airlie Beach. Rynn said he had noticed that sharks were getting closer to the shore since the drum lines were removed in September

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